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6 Reviews
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Don't miss the point
To the reviewer who said they never do "heavy lifting while balanced on an oversized inflatable ball...": That's not the point. The point is to strengthen your core muscles, to help you develop a healthy and strong back and abdominal muscles, which will help you prevent injury and reduce your risk of getting hurt when you perform other daily activities. It's a...
Published on July 1, 2004

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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not the best
This book, while offering some good guidelines for general fitness, does not have adaquate, specific, workout plans to address the various areas of fitness. Any book by Stew Smith, especially Maximum Fitness, or The Boot Camp Workout does a better job without all the high-and-mighty "I am a trained professional so just do as I tell you" attitude that these...
Published on January 28, 2002


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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not the best, January 28, 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Functional Training: Everyone's Guide to the New Fitness Revolution (Paperback)
This book, while offering some good guidelines for general fitness, does not have adaquate, specific, workout plans to address the various areas of fitness. Any book by Stew Smith, especially Maximum Fitness, or The Boot Camp Workout does a better job without all the high-and-mighty "I am a trained professional so just do as I tell you" attitude that these authors show. This book is written by several different people and as such. lacks continuity and a definitive workout plan. Alot of it comes across as the various authors' opinions. Do yourself a favor and buy Stew Smith's books instead.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Don't miss the point, July 1, 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Functional Training: Everyone's Guide to the New Fitness Revolution (Paperback)
To the reviewer who said they never do "heavy lifting while balanced on an oversized inflatable ball...": That's not the point. The point is to strengthen your core muscles, to help you develop a healthy and strong back and abdominal muscles, which will help you prevent injury and reduce your risk of getting hurt when you perform other daily activities. It's a way of a) training your body to stay healthy and in shape and b) transferring the skills employed in the gym to your every-day life.
The stability ball is merely a tool in helping you strenghthen your core, and your ability to balance and multi-task.
Give this type of training another chance, keeping this information in mind, and I guarantee you will start to see things differently.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Introduction, April 21, 2011
By 
Brenda H (Chicago, IL United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Functional Training: Everyone's Guide to the New Fitness Revolution (Paperback)
Although I've been doing conditioning for well over a year now, I didn't know that another name for what I was doing was functional training. This book cleared up my confusion and helped me to understand what some of the classes I was taking in the gym were about. I basically see functional training as conditioning that moves the body in multiple planes--backwards, forwards, laterally--that integrates multiple muscle groups, that resembles the types of things we do in real life, such as bending over, and that builds a strong core, because our core protects most of our vital organs and most of our movement and all of our balance emanates from our core. While yes, having a well sculpted and toned body is nice, being able to step out of bed in the morning without stiffness or being able to bend down to pick up something I've dropped without hurting my back while listening to my knees pop is more important. However, I would recommend also adding one day each week of isolation training, or machine weights, to increase muscle mass. If you can have a sculpted, functional, and strong body, why choose?
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars FT Review, December 22, 2008
This review is from: Functional Training: Everyone's Guide to the New Fitness Revolution (Paperback)
This book illustrates what is the functional training. One can developed advance level of functional training after mastering this book.
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9 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Based on the Latest In Fitness!, March 13, 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Functional Training: Everyone's Guide to the New Fitness Revolution (Paperback)
Unfortunately the latest is not the greatest. The author's idea of functional training is that the most important element in any excercise is instability. However, I rarely find myself doing heavy lifting while balanced on an oversized inflatable ball. Sure, there are some good uses for Swiss Balls, but they're more of a supplement to traditional heavy weight routines. This is the type of training that I have always found most "functional". Unless you have very poor balance or you do most of your activities on an unstable surface, then other types of training will probably give you better carryover.
Basically, this book is capitalizing on a recent trend in the fitness industry towards functionality. Unfortunately, nothing in this book will help you move furniture, open a pickle jar, or become a better athlete. Take a look at books by Tsatsouline, Kubik, Bass, Strossen, Siff or others for more thorough books on fitness.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FUNctional FITness is where it is at!, January 7, 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Functional Training: Everyone's Guide to the New Fitness Revolution (Paperback)
Great book on an important trend in fitness. Whether you want to train for sports or just want to get more out of your workouts, this book details a variety of programs and exercises that add innovation and fun to your routine. Recommended.
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Functional Training: Everyone's Guide to the New Fitness Revolution
Functional Training: Everyone's Guide to the New Fitness Revolution by RoseMarie Alfieri (Paperback - September 15, 2001)
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