Customer Reviews


73 Reviews
5 star:
 (43)
4 star:
 (19)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


132 of 142 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I love your funny face! Your sunny, funny face!"
In 1957, Paramount produced a very enjoyable musical comedy called "Funny Face", directed by Stanley Donen, and to the music of George Gershwin, Adolph Deutsch, Roger Edens and Leonard Gershe. With a simple plot, the film begins in New York City within the offices of the major fashion magazine named "Quality". Its president, Maggie Prescott (Kay Thompson), is determined...
Published on January 9, 2003 by M. Hart

versus
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth it for Hepburn fans
This is an odd little musical. Audrey Hepburn plays a book shop clerk that is discovered by a fashion magazine, and travels to Paris as their newest model. There she explores the underground nightlife and begins to develop a romance with her photographer, played by Fred Astaire.

The performances are fine all around, and Hepburn's stage talents particularly...
Published on May 12, 2006 by Simon


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

132 of 142 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I love your funny face! Your sunny, funny face!", January 9, 2003
This review is from: Funny Face (DVD)
In 1957, Paramount produced a very enjoyable musical comedy called "Funny Face", directed by Stanley Donen, and to the music of George Gershwin, Adolph Deutsch, Roger Edens and Leonard Gershe. With a simple plot, the film begins in New York City within the offices of the major fashion magazine named "Quality". Its president, Maggie Prescott (Kay Thompson), is determined to find a new way to promote the magazine. In a moment of inspiration, she comes up with the slogan "Think pink," and breaks into song praising the color pink and saying that everything (from women's clothing, soap, furniture, etc.) must be pink. Of course, she "wouldn't be caught dead" in it.
Moving on to another magazine project, Maggie wants to find the perfect spot to photograph one of the magazine's models named Marion (Dovima, who was a major fashion model in the 1950's working closely with photographer Richard Avedon. This was her only film.). An assistant suggests that they go to a bookstore in Greenwich Village to create an intellectual atmosphere. Maggie, Marion, a host of Maggie's staff all in pink and the magazines head photographer, Dick Avery (Fred Astaire), force their way into a dingy, but quiet, bookstore along with all of their equipment. A store employee, Jo Stockton (Audrey Hepburn) protests the uninvited intrusion vehemently, but the "Quality" magazine army locks her out of the store to work undisturbed. After several hours, the "Quality" mob vacates, but the books and store are left in a shambles for Jo to clean up. Dick offers his help to clean the store, but Jo refuses. After Dick leaves, Jo proceeds to sing another wonderful song in the film, "How Long Has This Been Going On?"
Maggie decides that "Quality" must find a real "Quality woman" to represent the magazine and it isn't Marion. When Dick develops the photos taken at the bookstore, Jo is in one of them. He suggests to Maggie that Jo could be the woman that they need, but Maggie has her doubts. To lure Jo to the "Quality" offices, they order a large number of books and want them delivered. Jo arrives hours later with a pile of books and is accosted by Maggie's staff who want to redress her in preparation for a photo shoot. Jo escapes and hides in Dick's dark room. They talk and he sings to her another of the film's title song, "Funny Face". Jo completely disagrees with everything that "Quality" magazine represents; she believes in "empathicalism", a philosophy that rejects all material things, as described by her idol, Professor Emile Flostre, who lives in Paris. When Jo is told that the "Quality woman" photo shoot and a fashion show will be done in Paris, she reluctantly agrees to be the model since it will give her the opportunity to meet Prof. Flostre.
The film continues in Paris where Jo models many clothes designed by Givenchy and a romance between her and Dick Avery develops. Jo finally gets the opportunity to meet Prof. Flostre (Michel Auclair), but will he meet Jo's expectations? Will the romance between Jo and Dick survive the photo shoot and meeting Prof. Flostre? Does Maggie get to produce the Paris fashion show of your dreams? You'll just have to watch this very entertaining film to find out!
The songs in the film include:
* "Think Pink" 5/5, Kay Thompson. A fast, snappy & whimsical song.
* "How Long Has This Been Going On?" 5/5, A blues song sung by Audrey Hepburn at the bookstore.
* "Funny Face" 5/5, Fred Astaire. A charming song.
* "Bonjour Paris" 5/5, Fred Astaire, Audrey Hepburn, Kay Thompson. A fun song filmed at various locations in Paris.
* "He Loves and She Loves" 4.5/5 Audrey Hepburn and Fred Astair. Filmed at Le Château de la Reine Blanche in Coye-la-Forêt with Audrey Hepburn modeling a wedding dress.
* "How To Be Lovely" 5/5, Kay Thompson and Audrey Hepburn. A fun & gutsy song.
* "Basal Metabolism" 4.5/5, A blues song that Audrey Hepburn dances to in a bistro.
* "Clap Yo' Hands" 5/5, A fun, melodramatic blues song sung by Fred Astaire and Kay Thompson to sneak into the bistro. (a.k.a. "Ring-a Them Bells")
* "Let's Kiss and Make Up" 4.5/5 Fred Astaire. A love song sung again at Le Château de la Reine Blanche.
* "'S Wonderful" 5/5, Audrey Hepburn and Fred Astaire. Another love song sung at Le Château de la Reine Blanche.
Some may think that "Funny Face" is nothing more than fluff, but it was produced to entertain with color, fashion, music, dance and comedy and it does so very well. The acting, singing and dancing from Audrey Hepburn, Fred Astaire and Kay Thompson is quite good and I rate "Funny Face" with 5 out of 5 stars. If you're primarily interested in Oscar-winning dramas, "Funny Face" may disappoint you; but if you enjoy light-hearted musicals and like to laugh, then you'll probably be very entertained with this fun film!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A WONDERFUL MUSICAL IN DIRE NEED OF RESTORATION., March 20, 2005
By 
Unlucky Frank (Lalaland, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Funny Face (DVD)
My third favorite musical of all time following WEST SIDE STORY and SINGIN' IN THE RAIN. And why shouldn't it be, it's directed by SINGIN' IN THE RAIN's Stanley Donen. It's got Audrey Hepburn, the greatest movie star of all time. Unlike MY FAIR LADY, Audrey actually gets to sing in this one. It's got Fred Astaire, the greatest song and danceman ever to grace the silver screen. It contains one of the greatest solo dance routines Fred has ever done. A great romantic pairing with Fred and Audrey in a Parisian park that will bring tears to your eyes. Some weird 50's beatnik humor. The best photography of Paris I've ever seen. And a great score, mostly by George and Ira Gershwin. So, what's not to like?

THE TRANSFER IS GOD AWFUL!! Washed out color and a horribly grainy look that all but spoils this wonderful film.

IF EVER A CLASSIC FILM NEEDED RESTORATION, THIS IS IT!! Please, would someone get a hold of this masterpiece of romantic musical comedy and do it the justice it deserves. ANYTHING LESS WOULD BE A CRIME.

5 STARS FOR THE FILM. 0 STARS FOR THE DVD. SHAMEFUL!! ACT ACCORDINGLY.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great movie and the DVD Transfer is Crystal Clear!, May 16, 2001
By A Customer
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Funny Face (DVD)
I don't think I've ever seen a good print of this film till I bought the DVD, which is fabulous! I'm not a die-hard Audrey Hepburn fan, but she is very charming and looks fabulous in the fashions. I love the ability to skip the numbers I don't like with the DVD since I find this a very uneven film. When it is good it is nearly flawless (and that's most of the time--opening credits, Think Pink, Funny Face, Bonjour Paris, The Photo Shoots, S'Wonderful, the final fashion show) but when it is bad it is horrid (a 60 year old Fred Astaire trying to be a beatnik, Fred's unending "matador" dance number, the whole plot with the Professor, Clap Yo'Hands). I was disappointed in the additional features--the original trailer is ho hum and the Paramount "documentary" is really just an extended sales pitch with bad stock footage. Where's an interview with the great Stanley Donen? Still, overall well worth purchasing.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FUNNY FACE: They Don't Make 'Em Like This Anymore., September 23, 2004
By 
Donato (California) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Funny Face (DVD)
For years I'd heard about this film. I'm a fan of Audrey Hepburn, not particularly of Astaire, but got a deal on the DVD so what the heck. I was surprised at how good this 1957 picture really is. Here are the ingredients: Hepburn, Astaire, songs by the Gershwins, Paris locations, high fashion, an Eliza Doolittle-like transformation, and (the real kicker) KAY THOMPSON. This woman is worth the price alone. A cross between Eve Arden and, maybe, Bea Arthur, Kay was a renaissance woman: vocal arranger, singer, pianist, actress, songwriter, and author of the "Eloise" books (an illustrated series of so-called children's books concerning a spoiled little girl who lives at the Plaza in New York.) Thompson died in 1998 in her 90's, and FUNNY FACE serves as a lasting tribute to one facet of her talent. Not bad, considering the star power she's up against in this wonderful Stanley Donen film. Trust me, this picture is like eating a rich dessert, in secret, while on a strict diet.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's all worth it just for one scene...., July 6, 2002
By 
Annex "annexgirl" (Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Funny Face (DVD)
Audrey Hepburn, one of the biggest style icons of all time, floats down a staircase in a beautiful floor length red dress, with a red scarf billowing behind her. In a breathless, excited voice she says the words, "Take the picture! Take the picture!"
This is the perfect movie to watch on a lazy Sunday afternoon. Audrey's beauty, sophistication and style. Fred Astaire dancing in such a way you are forced to wonder how a man could be capable of such moves. Top it all off with the romantic scenery of Paris.
A charming story of a newly discovered model (Hepburn), falling in love with her photographer (Astaire). Although she tries to fight her feelings, (and although you know the boy will undoubtedly get the girl in the end), it is still a pleasure to watch.
A beautifully restored classic. Check it out!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars all-Gershwin! all-Great!, May 4, 2005
By 
Byron Kolln (the corner where Broadway meets Hollywood) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Funny Face (DVD)
FUNNY FACE is the Paramount movie musical at it's height. The simple story concerns "dowdy, bookish intellectual shopgirl" Jo Stockton (Audrey Hepburn) who unwittingly gets turned into the most chic fashion model in the world. The editor of `Quality Magazine' Miss Prescott (Kay Thompson) and photographer Dick Avery (Fred Astaire) join Jo as she makes her big debut in Paris. Though Jo would rather be enjoying herself at one of the beatnik bars dancing to "Basal Metabolism"! Audrey Hepburn (refeshingly un-dubbed) sings all her own numbers and displays a winning and easy singing voice (though I can understand why she was later dubbed for MY FAIR LADY). She also gets to make use of her early dance training with some great numbers ("S'Wonderful", "He Loves and She Loves" and "How Long Has This Been Going On?"). Kay Thompson, that delicious, hilarious vivacious creature, gets a two bonafide showstoppers - "Think Pink" and "Clap Yo' Hands" - and delivers them in her best style. Fred Astaire ably accompanies Miss Hepburn and Miss Thompson with the dizzying "Bonjour Paris". Fabulous costumes from Givenchy. I can't recommend this gem highly enough!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lessons in style from Fred Astaire, Kay Thompson, Audrey Hepburn and Richard Avedon, January 4, 2007
By 
C. O. DeRiemer (San Antonio, Texas, USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Funny Face (DVD)
For the first not-quite-half of Stanley Donen's Funny Face we are in the midst of a stylish, high-fashion fairy tale, populated by the likes of Fred Astaire, Audrey Hepburn and Kay Thompson, and transported along by some fine George and Ira Gershwin songs. For the second half, some of the effervescence loses its fizz...all that boy-loses-girl, boy-wins-girl-back stuff, combined with some unfunny, dated riffs on beatniks and Hollywood's version of Sartre. Still, Funny Face has much in its favor, and to my way of thinking is the best of the Astaire movies he made following The Band Wagon.

Maggie Prescott (Kay Thompson), relentless force of nature and editor of the high fashion magazine Quality, is determined to find a new look. Her top fashion photographer Dick Avery (Fred Astaire) thinks he's found just the person, a mousy little bookseller they encountered during a fashion shoot in Greenwich Village. But Jo Stockton (Audrey Hepburn) is having none of it. Jo is a devotee of empathecalism, thinks fashion is ridiculous and wants nothing more than to read books, dress sensibly and go to Paris to meet her guru. It's not long before they're all in Paris...Maggie with her expansive ideas for the magazine with Jo as the new woman, Jo reluctantly agreeing to model so she can get to Paris, and Dick photographing Jo in some stunning creations (designed for Hepburn by Givenchy). After some songs, some dances, some arguments and some kisses, a reasonably believable Autumn/Spring romance between Astaire and Hepburn sends them dancing into the countryside to S'Wonderful. We exit smiling.

Funny Face glows with style. The Avery character was based on high-fashion photographer Richard Avedon (who also is noted for serious photo collections). Avedon was a consultant on the movie, and his sense of color and composition, and how to present high fashion permeates the place. Style was also one of Astaire's noted gifts, as it was with Kay Thompson. And Hepburn isn't far behind. The three of them give a fine gloss to a simple story. Their skills as performers and personalities make the musical numbers, for the most part, special. Among the high points:

--Think Pink, a specialty number for Thompson by Roger Edens and Leonard Gershe. It's bright and funny, and introduces us to Maggie Prescott, the magazine and the world of high fashion. It sets the tone of the movie.

--How Long Has This Been Going On is sung without ornamentation by Hepburn. She's a competent singer.

--Funny Face, perhaps the highlight of the movie. Even though we've had to wait almost 30 minutes to get to Astaire doing his stuff, it's worth it. Astaire sings to Hepburn in a darkroom while he takes her picture, blows it up and develops it. Hepburn thinks her face is "funny;" Astaire thinks it's extraordinary.

"I love your funny face,

Your sunny, funny face.

For you're a cutie

With more than beauty.

You've got a lot of

per-son-a-li-ty N.T.

You fill the air with smiles

For miles and miles and miles.

Though you're no Mona Lisa,

For worlds I'd not replace

Your sunny, funny face."

After we see the print, a tight, soft close-up of her features, we know Astaire's right. The song and its delivery has everything we expect of Astaire and includes a nice, not-too-demanding dance with Hepburn that's light and graceful.

--Lets Kiss and Make Up. This clever Gershwin song sung by Astaire to Hepburn moves into an extended dance routine where he once again demonstrates he can make excellent dance partners of inanimate objects, in this case his umbrella and his topcoat.

--He Loves and She Loves. A sweet and graceful declaration of love sung by Astaire and danced by the two of them outside a country church. It's filmed with a soft focus which some may appreciate and others find irritating.

The only real stinker is a humorless send-up of beatniks sung and danced by Astaire and Thompson to the Gershwin's Clap Yo' Hands. The routine probably was dated when it was filmed.

And even if you don't much care for high fashion (I'm one of those) and even if your heart doesn't beat all that faster for Audrey Hepburn (mine doesn't skip too many beats), the combination of Hepburn's face, Givenchy's gowns and Avedon's photography are in a different kind of reality. Hepburn taking a pose in a green silk gown with her hair pulled back and that neck as long and graceful as a swan's is stunning. Hepburn in a red gown with a long red scarf flowing behind her as she lightly runs down the stone steps in the Louvre with the Winged Victory of Samothrace framing her descent is unforgettable.

And here's to Kay Thompson, one of the most vivid and stylish of creatures. She only made two or three movies but had a long career as vocal arranger, voice coach, singer, nightclub entertainer, songwriter and author (all those books about Eloise and the Plaza). She was a great and true friend of Judy Garland's and was Liza Minnelli's godmother. In Thompson's last years when she was frail and ill, Minnelli moved her into Minnelli's New York apartment and oversaw her care until Thompson died.

The DVD transfer looks good. There are no extras to speak of, just a photo gallery, a movie trailer and a puff-piece featurette called Paramount in the 1950's, largely a collection of brief snips from Paramount movies.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth it for Hepburn fans, May 12, 2006
By 
Simon (Brampton, ON) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Funny Face (DVD)
This is an odd little musical. Audrey Hepburn plays a book shop clerk that is discovered by a fashion magazine, and travels to Paris as their newest model. There she explores the underground nightlife and begins to develop a romance with her photographer, played by Fred Astaire.

The performances are fine all around, and Hepburn's stage talents particularly shine through in one solo routine in a nightclub. But the overall experience just isn't very memorable. Stacked against the major MGM musicals from the era, Funny Face lacks the boldness and scale of those productions (though much of the production staff was supposedly part of the MGM crew as well). It's not a bad film by any means, and certainly worth the purchase for Audrey or Fred Astaire fans, but it's not one you're going to remember these classic screen icons for.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Magical musical, November 6, 2004
By 
David Bonesteel (Fresno, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Funny Face (DVD)
A beautiful intellectual (Audrey Hepburn) is recruited by a successful fashion photographer (Fred Astaire) and an aggressive fashion magazine publisher (Kay Thompson) for a prestigious Paris photo shoot, setting the stage for romance, comedy, and lots of song and dance. There's plenty to enjoy here: Hepburn is luminous, Astaire is graceful, and Thompson is explosive. Okay, the film's veneration of the fashion scene and simultaneous denigration of the intellectual scene betrays questionable values. And, okay, Hepburn is not very convincing as an intellectual and Astaire is clearly too old for her. But when Hepburn and Astaire begin to dance to those great Gershwin tunes, who cares? Director Stanley Donen's playful direction and inventive use of color adds to the fun.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars empathicalism for beginners ... and agile photographers, June 30, 2006
By 
David A. Baer (Indianapolis, IN USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Funny Face (DVD)
The look on the Parisian photographer's aid as he watches Audrey Hepburn pose from his perch on the Seine riverboat says it all. She's magic.

But she's not alone.

George and Ira Gershwin made the music magic. Fred Astaire provided the masculine charm, even if he'd have to be arrested for abuse of a minor if he made this film today alongside the gorgeously youthful Hepburn.

Whatever the exact mix, Funny Face is a magical film, pulled off mostly in Paris just a dozen years after the Germans abandoned the City of Lights and hightailed it for home.

For people like me who had not yet been conceived in 1957, you can watch this unforgettable movie for the art. Or you can view it as a period piece of Americana. Don't get hung up on the choice. You'll love the film either way. Plus, you owe it to your education to understand that movies like this were made once upon a time and that the flicks you see today have this DNA in their genetics.

Kay Thompson is no slouch as the ever-confident editor of Quality Magazine. In fact, she provides the hard feminine foil that casts Hepburn's softness in such a beguiling light. Do people with Thompson's energy still get born somewhere? I'm sure they must, though it's no longer cool to let it out in quite such explosive bursts. Thompson's editorial matriarch wouldn't have worried too much about that. She'd be too busy crafting her next editorial for 'the American women ... no, make it *all* the women.' That, or speaking - with Astaire - some of the finest bad French on celluloid. The two also exchange some indelibly hilarious lines at the French master of empathicalism's salon.

Yet for all this stunning mélange of artistry, Hepburn is clearly the (soft) focus. Forgive me, I just have to say this once and then it'll be over: She's s'wonderful.

What a film. As Professor Emile Flostre might have said - indeed he did - 'I can still see them when I close my eyes.'
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Funny Face
Funny Face by Stanley Donen (DVD - 2001)
$8.99 $6.99
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.