Funny How Things Change and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $4.31 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 20 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 22? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by -bearbooks-
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: USED book, some wear from reading and creases. Qualifies for PRIME and FREE SHIPPING!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Funny How Things Change Hardcover


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$12.64
$2.89 $0.01 $7.95

Frequently Bought Together

Funny How Things Change + Thirteen Reasons Why
Price for both: $18.84

Buy the selected items together
  • Thirteen Reasons Why $6.20

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR); First Edition edition (April 27, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374302332
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374302337
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #511,653 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Remy’s life in the West Virginian mountain town of Dwyer has always been the same: hard, quiet, and monotonous, and that’s just how he likes it. But with graduation behind him, Remy agrees to go with his girlfriend, Lisa, to Pennsylvania as she begins college. It seems like a good idea—after all, he can’t live in a trailer with his dad forever—yet the concept of going from an insider to an outsider scares him. His quandary finds a focal point with the unapologetically flirty Dana, an artist visiting Dwyer to paint a mural. Wyatt’s plot is as understated as her protagonist, but what it lacks in action it makes up for in nuance. Remy is a careful creation, a good old boy who’s not entirely good, and who must come to terms with the nature of teen romance as well as the mountain-size chip on his shoulder. Wyatt also adds a sense of urgency with Remy’s dad’s plan to sell the family land. Readers will identify with Remy and his feeling of being torn between a comfortable past and uncertain future. Grades 9-12. --Daniel Kraus

Review

“Wyatt’s prose is tautly evocative throughout; her plot is a welcome departure from the stale conventions of the hero’s journey.” —Starred, Kirkus Reviews

“Good writing drives stellar characterization of this strong but introspective protagonist struggling with his own version of the universal questions of who he is and what matters most . . . . Kinship with Remy will come easily to readers facing similar decisions about growing up and leaving home.” —School Library Journal

“Beautifully spare language portrays the quiet story of a good guy.” —VOYA

“Readers will identify with Remy and his feeling of being torn between a comfortable past and uncertain future.” —Booklist

“This timeless drama of a teen trying to make the right decision about his future is credibly set against timely issues about bad local economies based on unsustainable mining practices, making for a memorable and truly compelling coming-of-age-story.” –Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books

“Thoughtfully written.” —Teensreadtoo.com

“An intimate look into a young man’s life and the decisions he must make.” —Towerofbooks.wordpress.com

“A beautifully written male character.” —Apatchworkofbooks.blogspot.com

“A great look at reasons to leave home versus reasons to stay (without involving any abuse, death or depression) and also has an environmental angle involving mountain top removal . . . . Very well done.” —ChasingRay.com




More About the Author

Melissa Wyatt was born in York, Pennsylvania. In addition to writing, she has also worked as a sculptor and professional photographer. She lives with a bunch of men (husband and two sons.) For some reason she can't adequately explain, she still lives in York.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 9 customer reviews
Great job writing this Melissa Wyatt.
sluckenbaugh
All the characters were three-dimensional, and the mountain setting itself was so vividly conveyed it practically became its own character.
Debra Garfinkle
Through Wyatt's characterization, you get a real good feel as to who Remy really is.
TeensReadToo

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Yana V. Rodgers on July 24, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Remy Walker has an unusually strong affection for his West Virginia hometown, Dwyer, and a deep appreciation for the Appalachian Mountains that embrace his home and community. As a very recent high school graduate, he stands at an important crossroad, profoundly confused about which way to turn. Does he follow the love of his life, Lisa, to Pennsylvania where she will be attending college? Or does he stay with his father in the place that has more splendor and meaning than any other location he could imagine?

The decision becomes more complicated with he learns that his father may sell Walker Mountain to a large mining company in order to help support Remy financially in Pennsylvania. Adding to the complexity is the arrival of an intriguing young female artist in town who helps Remy to see beauty in a whole new way. With its unforgettable characters and electrifying storyline, this superb book has enormous appeal from start to finish.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By TeensReadToo on July 1, 2009
Format: Hardcover
It's not very often that you read a love story from a guy's point of view. FUNNY HOW THINGS CHANGE by Melissa Wyatt is not a typical love story, either, which makes this book all the more desirable.

When you grow up you, you move out and move on, at least that is what Remy's girlfriend, Lisa, is doing when she heads to Pennsylvania in the fall for college. Of course, Remy wants to go - it's what Lisa and him have been talking about for years. The start of a whole new life, everything they have always wanted.

Or is it? It's okay to be uncertain, especially at seventeen. You are not expected to know everything, but if you are going to leave, make sure you are doing it for all the right reasons.

For Remy, Dwyer, West Virginia, is his home and no matter where he goes or wants to go it will always be his home. Some people may look at Remy and think that because he is one of those mountain people that he is a hick, a redneck, or a hillbilly. Home is where the heart is.

While he doesn't have much, he and his pops live in a trailer up in Walkers Hollow, Remy knows every nook and cranny of that place, and he looks forward to seeing those mountains every day. He knows he is home. His family all lives there and his roots are deep into the soil of the mountains.

The two loves seem to be in competition with each other. Which one is stronger? There are a lot of factors that play into this tug-of-war. His family, money, and even an outsider's opinion will weigh heavily on what he decides. What is the right choice?

I think there should be more characters like Remy Walker. By no means is he perfect, but he has a good heart and head on his shoulders. Through Wyatt's characterization, you get a real good feel as to who Remy really is.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Debra Garfinkle on June 18, 2009
Format: Hardcover
My favorite kind of book: An entertaining page-turner with romance, which is also very well written and thought provoking.

The main character, Remy Walker, is realistically and deeply portrayed. I sympathized with him as he struggled to choose between his high school girlfriend who couldn't wait to get out of their tiny mountain town and the town itself, which had been home to his family for hundreds of years. All the characters were three-dimensional, and the mountain setting itself was so vividly conveyed it practically became its own character.

This was a fast read but one that will linger for a long time.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Krista on June 18, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Remy Walker has always lived in Dwyer, a small mountain town in West Virginia. In fact, the mountain that he lives on (Walker Mountain) has his family namesake. Now that Remy and his girlfriend, Lisa, have graduated from high school, Remy has to make the biggest decision of his life: Should he follow Lisa to Pennsylvania where she will attend college, and he will find a job, or should he stay in Dwyer? At first, the answer seems easy, follow Lisa, but then an outsider, Dana, helps him realize that the decision may not be as easy as it sounds.

Funny How Things Change is an intimate look into a young man's life and the decisions he must make. Remy is one of the most well-developed characters I've read about. Wyatt really dug beneath the surface of him, and this helped create a novel with a lot of feeling. Another great thing about Remy is that while overall he is a good person, he is not perfect. Funny How Things Change shows several mistakes that Remy has made, but these mistakes do not detract readers to the character. There's a specific moment toward the end (that I will not spoil) that could have ended in readers disliking Remy, but because his character was so well-written, readers were able to understand Remy. It takes a gifted writer to that, and Wyatt succeeded.

Another thing I liked about Funny How Things Change was that it's so different from most YA novels. I mean, how many YA novels have you read that take place in a mountain town? I enjoyed reading about mountain town because it's similar, yet different to what I know.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Erin Johnson on May 21, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Remy Walker hadn't really thought about leaving Dwyer, West Virginia until his girlfriend, Lisa, asks him to move to Pennsylvania with her when she goes to college. Remy is torn: he loves Lisa, but he doesn't know if he really wants to leave or not.

He agrees to go, since he doesn't really see a major reason not too. Everyone else seems to be quite willing to get out of town as soon as they can. Sooner, if possible. Then he runs into Dana, an artist who is spending her summer painting water towers to prove to her parents that she really can make money at being an artist. (They disapprove of her choice of major). He thinks about Dana a lot, and confusion sets in for young Remy. He loves Lisa, but there's just something about Dana that he can't quite figure out.

If you add in Remy's dad, their mountain (Walker mountain has been in his family for over 150 years) and the developers who want to buy it, you get quite the story. If the developers buy it, they will use it as a passageway to get to the other mountains that they are blowing up. Yes, the developers are literally blowing the tops off of the mountains to get to the coal inside. Remy's dad has made him an offer that he really thinks about before accepting. But what happens when he discovers something new about himself and wants to change his mind? Will it be too late? Will he choose Lisa or the mountain?

This was a good, quick read. You will feel for Remy as he comes to terms with how he feels about Lisa, his hometown, and leaving to see the rest of the world. This coming-of-age story will keep you turning the page, and leave you thinking about your own past choices long after you've finished the story.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa244078c)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?