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Further Along the Road Less Traveled: The Unending Journey Towards Spiritual Growth Paperback – January 2, 1998


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Further Along the Road Less Traveled: The Unending Journey Towards Spiritual Growth + The Road Less Traveled, Timeless Edition: A New Psychology of Love, Traditional Values and Spiritual Growth + People of the Lie: The Hope for Healing Human Evil
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 252 pages
  • Publisher: Touchstone; 2 edition (January 2, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 068484723X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684847238
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #84,046 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Fans of psychiatrist Peck's bestselling The Road Less Traveled will enjoy this self-help sequel, a collection of edited lectures that offers a tough-minded, liberating guide to learning to live and die with dignity, creativity and meaning. Peck maps four distinct steps of spiritual growth. The first stage is exemplified by antisocial persons; in the second are those who depend on religious or other institutions for meaning in their lives; next are religiously skeptical truth-seekers; the fourth stage embraces "mystical/communal" people attuned to the interconnectedness of all things. At times sounding himself like a mystic, he urges readers to discover the meaning of their lives by confronting the mystery and inevitability of death; envisages God as a sexual being who endowed human lovemaking with a spiritual component; outlines his vision of heaven and hell; and fuses psychiatric insights with his highly personal approach to Christianity. He also critiques the New Age movement, explores myths as guiding metaphors for psycho-spiritual growth and plumbs the roots of addiction, guilt, blame, self-hate and self-acceptance. BOMC featured alternate; QPB alternate.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

This sequel to The Road Less Traveled ( LJ 9/15/78), composed from lectures that best-selling author and psychiatrist Peck has given since his last success, presents spiritual as well as psychological aspects of adult maturation. He explores growing up into forgiveness rather than blame; finding meaning in death; developing genuine self-esteem while dealing with problems of omnipotence, good and evil, and heroism; coping with addictions, which Peck terms the sacred disease; and finding a personal god. Peck criticizes psychiatry for ignoring the spiritual histories of patients and for misdiagnosing as a result. Highly recommended. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 6/15/93.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

M. Scott Peck's publishing history reflects his own evolution as a serious and widely acclaimed writer, thinker, psychiatrist, and spiritual guide. Since his groundbreaking bestseller, The Road Less Traveled, was first published in 1978, his insatiable intellectual curiosity has taken him in various new directions with virtually each new book: the subject of healing human evil in People of the Lie (1982), where he first briefly discussed exorcism and possession; the creative experience of community in The Different Drum (1987); the role of civility in personal relationships and society in A World Waiting to Be Born (1993); an examination of the complexities of life and the paradoxical nature of belief in Further Along the Road Less Traveled (1993); and an exploration of the medical, ethical, and spiritual issues of euthanasia in Denial of the Soul (1999); as well as a novel, a children's book, and other works. A graduate of both Harvard University and Case Western Reserve, Dr. Peck served in the Army Medical Corps before maintaining a private practice in psychiatry. For the last twenty years, he has devoted much of his time and financial resources to the work of the Foundation for Community Encouragement, a nonprofit organization that he helped found in 1984. Dr. Peck lives in Connecticut.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

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#100 in Books > Self-Help
#100 in Books > Self-Help

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

84 of 85 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
Even better My guess is that if you are looking up this book it is because you are familliar with Scott Peck's work and particulary with The Road Less Travelled.
The Road Less Travelled had a profound impact on me in my early twenties - as I know it did millions of other people. Further Along the Road is just as good, if not better. I read it recently in my thirties and it felt like an extraordinarily wise and more mature book. I believe the man who wrote it, has grown in wisdom and maturity and he shares that here in a style which is, as always, clear, thought-provoking and above all affecting.
I felt like I was in the presence of a real truth-seeker and a man who had come a good way down the Less Travelled Road himself, and was not afraid to admit his failings and pitfalls.
I might add that after the Road less Travelled I bought a number of other Scott Peck books ( A Different Drum, A World WAiting to Be Born, People of the Lie) and was usually disappointed. Further Along on the other hand is a seriously good book. Highly recommended for all seekers of wisdom.
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33 of 33 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 6, 1998
Format: Paperback
It felt to me, like I was traveling along with Scott on his Journey towards spiritual growth. The more I read, the more interested I became: Here's a man who has traveled (as well as practiced) many different path to enlightenment, yet in the end he has the guts to say "I don't know...!". He gave me many practical hints on how to live life to the fullest, how to get a fresh picture of Jesus and many other, interesting subjects. I especially admired his willingness to reveal himself .Also, his Buddist philosophy of the paradoxal nature of beliefs is very refreshing. The only reason why I did not give it a 10 is because since reading: "Conversations with God", I cannot assign any other book with a higher mark. However, that does not take away from the day-today "hands-on' value of this book. I will definitely get the audio cassettes for those friends (and clients) of mine who could be greatly helped by a particular chapter from the book. Highly recommended for all spiritual counselors, preachers and those of you who struggle with the conventional image of God, the devil, Heaven and Hell. Good work Mr. Scott.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Russel Johannson on December 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
In the first fifty pages of this book Dr. Peck really inspires me. These pages will be reread by me for many years to come. His words are an affirmation that good work will reap rewards, even if it is not in the form of instant gratification.

These first pages remind me that there is a lot more out there, and it helps me to refocus on what is truly important to me, to my family, and to the community I live in. Dr. Peck really speaks to the man in me who wishes to do his best for those around me, as well as helping me to fight back the more selfish man within me.

I find this to be a frankly written book, written plainly without unnecessary exercises in intellectual grandeur. He writes intelligently, passionately, and compassionately as Dr. Peck reminds you that he is just a subject to failings as the reader.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 22, 2005
Format: Paperback
M. Scott Peck follows up his popular best-seller with this collection of essays melded together quite well to form a coherent book. The chapters range over a variety of topics that add to the spiritual growth theme Peck has going in his first book. The topics that stand out in my mind after having just read the book are as follows:

1. How society needs to think about dying more

2. How AA really has a good program - melding spirituality and psychology.

3. Science and religion (or spirituality) need to find common ground together after spending years in separate spheres.

4. The four stages of spiritual development.

There is more there too, but these are the topics that I remember the best. It's a very quick read and well worth your time. But read "The Road Less Traveled" first if you haven't done so already.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By imarunnergirl on May 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
I have read most of M. Scott Peck's work and enjoyed this one for his candid discussion on faith. He ties the relationship between psychology and faith together for the reader and states spiritual truth in a way that is applicable to everyday life. It is not necessary to read The Road Less traveled first to enjoy Further Along....
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38 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Aaron on September 21, 2002
Format: Paperback
Its impossible to discount Peck as an effective author. He's very passionate and moving in his books and he is indeed genuine. But this book does not have the power of the Road Less Travelled. This is mostly because Peck seems to have lost focus on why he wrote the original.
Peck's newer works tend to be based on conjecture and his own personal philosophies rather than on his expirience as a clinician. Furthermore he re-hashes many ideas on pain and myths and religion. His ideas about Christianity are fresh and entertaining but hardly based on a firm foundation.
But hardest to swallow was his his section on Heresy in which he claims heresy is alive and well in the church. Indeed it is, unfortunately its also in his book. I'm sure many Christian's would agree that Peck's idea that Jesus may have been bi-sexual, and therefor a sinner, would qualify as heresy. Also the way he discounts the scripture in many places shows that he's not exactly strong in his Christian faith, but still a skeptical pseudo-believer. Its miss-steps like this that carry on in the tradition of the shaky ending to his first book. Stick with the first sections on Discipline and Love, Peck is brilliant in them. Beyond that his work is usually good, but sometimes, quite bad.
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