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96 of 97 people found the following review helpful
on May 1, 2000
Even better My guess is that if you are looking up this book it is because you are familliar with Scott Peck's work and particulary with The Road Less Travelled.
The Road Less Travelled had a profound impact on me in my early twenties - as I know it did millions of other people. Further Along the Road is just as good, if not better. I read it recently in my thirties and it felt like an extraordinarily wise and more mature book. I believe the man who wrote it, has grown in wisdom and maturity and he shares that here in a style which is, as always, clear, thought-provoking and above all affecting.
I felt like I was in the presence of a real truth-seeker and a man who had come a good way down the Less Travelled Road himself, and was not afraid to admit his failings and pitfalls.
I might add that after the Road less Travelled I bought a number of other Scott Peck books ( A Different Drum, A World WAiting to Be Born, People of the Lie) and was usually disappointed. Further Along on the other hand is a seriously good book. Highly recommended for all seekers of wisdom.
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35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
on January 6, 1998
It felt to me, like I was traveling along with Scott on his Journey towards spiritual growth. The more I read, the more interested I became: Here's a man who has traveled (as well as practiced) many different path to enlightenment, yet in the end he has the guts to say "I don't know...!". He gave me many practical hints on how to live life to the fullest, how to get a fresh picture of Jesus and many other, interesting subjects. I especially admired his willingness to reveal himself .Also, his Buddist philosophy of the paradoxal nature of beliefs is very refreshing. The only reason why I did not give it a 10 is because since reading: "Conversations with God", I cannot assign any other book with a higher mark. However, that does not take away from the day-today "hands-on' value of this book. I will definitely get the audio cassettes for those friends (and clients) of mine who could be greatly helped by a particular chapter from the book. Highly recommended for all spiritual counselors, preachers and those of you who struggle with the conventional image of God, the devil, Heaven and Hell. Good work Mr. Scott.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on December 5, 2005
In the first fifty pages of this book Dr. Peck really inspires me. These pages will be reread by me for many years to come. His words are an affirmation that good work will reap rewards, even if it is not in the form of instant gratification.

These first pages remind me that there is a lot more out there, and it helps me to refocus on what is truly important to me, to my family, and to the community I live in. Dr. Peck really speaks to the man in me who wishes to do his best for those around me, as well as helping me to fight back the more selfish man within me.

I find this to be a frankly written book, written plainly without unnecessary exercises in intellectual grandeur. He writes intelligently, passionately, and compassionately as Dr. Peck reminds you that he is just a subject to failings as the reader.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on April 22, 2005
M. Scott Peck follows up his popular best-seller with this collection of essays melded together quite well to form a coherent book. The chapters range over a variety of topics that add to the spiritual growth theme Peck has going in his first book. The topics that stand out in my mind after having just read the book are as follows:

1. How society needs to think about dying more

2. How AA really has a good program - melding spirituality and psychology.

3. Science and religion (or spirituality) need to find common ground together after spending years in separate spheres.

4. The four stages of spiritual development.

There is more there too, but these are the topics that I remember the best. It's a very quick read and well worth your time. But read "The Road Less Traveled" first if you haven't done so already.
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46 of 53 people found the following review helpful
on September 21, 2002
Its impossible to discount Peck as an effective author. He's very passionate and moving in his books and he is indeed genuine. But this book does not have the power of the Road Less Travelled. This is mostly because Peck seems to have lost focus on why he wrote the original.
Peck's newer works tend to be based on conjecture and his own personal philosophies rather than on his expirience as a clinician. Furthermore he re-hashes many ideas on pain and myths and religion. His ideas about Christianity are fresh and entertaining but hardly based on a firm foundation.
But hardest to swallow was his his section on Heresy in which he claims heresy is alive and well in the church. Indeed it is, unfortunately its also in his book. I'm sure many Christian's would agree that Peck's idea that Jesus may have been bi-sexual, and therefor a sinner, would qualify as heresy. Also the way he discounts the scripture in many places shows that he's not exactly strong in his Christian faith, but still a skeptical pseudo-believer. Its miss-steps like this that carry on in the tradition of the shaky ending to his first book. Stick with the first sections on Discipline and Love, Peck is brilliant in them. Beyond that his work is usually good, but sometimes, quite bad.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on May 14, 2004
I have read most of M. Scott Peck's work and enjoyed this one for his candid discussion on faith. He ties the relationship between psychology and faith together for the reader and states spiritual truth in a way that is applicable to everyday life. It is not necessary to read The Road Less traveled first to enjoy Further Along....
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on January 6, 1998
It felt to me, like I was traveling along with Scott on his Journey towards spiritual growth. The more I read, the more interested I became: Here's a man who has traveled (as well as practiced) many different path to enlightenment, yet in the end he has the guts to say "I don't know...!". He gave me many practical hints on how to live life to the fullest, how to get a fresh picture of Jesus and many other, interesting subjects. I especially admired his willingness to reveal himself .Also, his Buddist philosophy of the paradoxal nature of beliefs is very refreshing. The only reason why I did not give it a 10 is because since reading: "Conversations with God", I cannot assign any other book with a higher mark. However, that does not take away from the day-today "hands-on' value of this book. I will definitely get the audio cassettes for those friends (and clients) of mine who could be greatly helped by a particular chapter from the book. Highly recommended for all spiritual counselors, preachers and those of you who struggle with the conventional image of God, the devil, Heaven and Hell. Good work Mr. Scott.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on March 11, 2010
The late Dr. Morgan Scott Peck has been a gift to me, quite literally. Two of his books literally "landed" at my home totally unexpectedly. I ordered neither book. I'll comment about "Further Along the Road Less Traveled" only, because this book is a unique literary piece compiled by a talented medical doctor, and a team of publishing professionals.

This book deserves to stand alone out of sheer respect for the art of writing and for the people who make the art come to life in it's black and white book form. Comparisons to Dr. Peck's other books might otherwise minimize the worth of the individuals who together made this work a reality. Living souls, men and women living inside of attractive and unattractive bodies, just like you and me; they cared enough about the reader and their professions to devote time, energy, and resources to get this book to the shelves.

For me, I found the book having an almost "whimsical" quality. By and large, this book chronicles the spiritual journey in life that Dr. Peck found himself traveling as the result of his skill in arranging words so as to passionately communicate with the spirits of his readers. Dr. Peck was indeed an imperfect mortal man, but I believe he translated inspiration communicated to him by an Incredible and Compelling spiritual Voice that finds It's home, It's UNIQUE and PERSONAL dwelling place, deep within each individual reader.

Dr. Peck discusses the path of growth in his personal relationship with "God", which evolved through his interpretation of the written psycho-spiritual legacy of a certain Jewish carpenter who passionately lived and died among us, as one of us: a "son of man". The influence of Carl Jung and the Gospels combined in forming the indelible signature of this gifted psychiatrist who can touch many in just the right way and in just the right places with this book.

This book is essentially a journal of Morgan's lifelong journey sketched in vignettes which led him to learning, understanding, and developing abstract spiritual concepts; then his attempts (successful and unsuccessful) to weave these "graces" into whichever nooks and crannies of life the author found himself. M. Scott Peck is bold and "earthy". In this book, his words and ideas are thought-provoking, his delivery is passionate, and more than anything else, he writes in a non-clinical "no-nonsense" manner that is easy to understand.

Scott Peck writes with experience and power. His concept of "Spiritual Stages of Growth" forms a viable modality which should become a mandatory element in psychotherapy. The author's discussion of "secular humanism" and it's subtle negative professional bias is an eye-opener. Peck's understanding of "using God's name in vain" speaks to my heart - no - it RINGS with clarity! His discussion about "integrity" and "paradox" is bold, novel, yet remarkably succinct.

Morgan Scott Peck seems to have a firm grasp (albeit slightly "unconventional") on his personal faith which he describes as "Christianity" - which is also an underlying theme throughout this writing. Some "Christians" have commented that Peck goes too far "outside the box". Perhaps their God has limitations? I'll just speculate that "God" allowed Scott Peck certain spiritual liberties because "omnipotent" Truth probably would not be threatened by that which is unconventional or creative.

Dr. Morgan Scott Peck appealed to people - he was a "ham" and knew it; and he used it to follow his Calling in the best way he knew how. He was a healer; a peacemaker. I believe the world is a better place having been graced with his work. I admire Scott Peck because he is candid, and his human flaws are not hidden from the public eye. He is far from perfect, but that's something I can identify with, and his writing has helped me grow. If everyone who helped me to grow emotionally or spiritually were perfect, I would never have grown and would be doomed to a life and death filled with shame.

If you purchase this book, delve into it without any preconceived notions, or expectations based on Dr. Peck's other books. I found that this book, indeed, stood on it's own, and was distinctly different than his other books that I've read. Yet this darn book managed to FIND ME ON ITS OWN! A rather remarkable feat of synchronicity, wouldn't you say? Of course there was "magic" in this. "Further Along the Road Less Traveled" delivered deep thought and inspiration that I might not have explored because I never thought once of buying the book. Yet here comes M. Scott Peck changing my life AGAIN! It's mysterious how "change" sometimes can literally show up unexpected right on one's doorstep. Remarkable!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on May 19, 2011
If you're interested in human behavior and thought, Including your own, this book is not only a must read, it may very well be the ONLY book to read. I read it in paperback in 1988 and gave it away to another one searching for answers to lifes' questions. I just purchased this hard cover edition for my reference library and for my sons' mental and spiritual development. It is consise, easy to read and makes it very easy to understand some very deep and important psycological and socialogical pheonomina. It answers questions we all have, Like, What is love? How does one attain spiritual elightenment? Why we fight and how to stop it. It ties spirituality (Not religion) with Psycology in a way that makes perfect sense to the reader no matter what their spiritual beliefs are. It's been said there is no instruction manual for life. Well, there is and this is it. Of course, as with any instruction manual, it's up to the reader whether or not to apply what they've learned. If you don't apply the leasons, you'll still remember them and be much better off for it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on July 26, 2012
I first saw the The revealing biography of Dr Scott Peck in a book shop. I bought it. The first page mentions"the man who wrote Road less travelled..". I closed it and bought TRLT and have read and reread it few times. Each time I read its new and more meaningful. I have given this book as gift to many people. Its a life changing book. Unfortunately I am yet to read his biography by Arthur Jones.
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