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Fusion


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Audio CD, February 26, 2013
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$11.99
$7.99 $3.65
Vinyl
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$34.99 $4.45

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Fusion + Fanny
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 26, 2013)
  • Original Release Date: 2013
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Real Gone Music
  • ASIN: B00ANDCYQW
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #156,645 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. White Winged Doves
2. Anthem
3. Jelly Jam
4. If I Should Sing Too Softly
5. How Does It Feel to Be Free
6. Pray for Rain
7. A Dream of Tomorrow
8. Everything's Better
9. Come and See Me
10. I Ride to Nowhere

Editorial Reviews

As one of the very few (and possibly only) denizens of that musical subgenre known as "mime rock," the Hello People could easily be dismissed as a gimmick act, but there was a lot more to them than just whiteface. Their roots actually trace back to the father of French mime, Etienne Decroux. During the '60s, Decroux taught painting to a group of musicians, who learned to paint so quickly that Decroux reasoned that musicians could also learn mime and apply it in some new way to create a new form. Thus inspired, the manager of the musicians Decroux had taught, Lou Futterman, then put together the Hello People, who went on to appear on The Tonight Show and The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, tour with Todd Rundgren during the '70s, and release four albums for Philips and ABC-Dunhill during the late '60s and early '70s. Fusion, their second (1968) album for Philips, is easily their best; it features "Anthem," whose stark, antiwar lyrics ("So I'm going to prison for what I believe/I'm going to prison so I can be free") penned by band songwriter W.S. "Sonny" Tongue (who had been incarcerated for resisting the draft) led to its being banned in a number of radio markets. The rest of the record is folky psych with jazzy touches, particularly on the 5/4-metered "Jelly Jam." Our Real Gone reissue includes the original gatefold art and adds new liner notes; it's the first album from this one-of-a-kind group ever released on CD.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By CMW-Tzvi on May 15, 2008
Format: Vinyl
Th Hello People were a group who performed music and appeared in white face during the late 1960's & early 1970's. They appeared a few times on the Dick Cavett Show, among other places.

FUSION was their most successful album, containing the hit "Anthem" (lyrics:
They say I was born in the land of the free
But the home of the briefcase is all I can see
With fine houses and highways we've covered our land
But freedom's a fable when the conscience is banned
So I'm going to prison for what I believe
I'm going to prison so I can be free
I've got something I'll die for, what else can they do?
I've got something to live for- what about you?)

FUSION also contains several other wonderful tracks, especially "White Winged Doves" and "If I Should Speak Too Softly".

I have looked everywhere I can, but none of the Hello People albums seem to have made it to CD-- a REAL SHAME, since they are one of the undeservedly forgotten great bands of their time (with thoughtful & meaningful lyrics)!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By hyperbolium on March 22, 2013
Format: Audio CD
The Hello People were a late-60s sextet that performed in white face and mimed skits amid their live musical performances. Their visual imagery and theatrical skills landed the band slots on several television variety shows, but even with national exposure, their records failed to dent the charts. The group's best known track, "Anthem," was a pungent reaction to songwriter Sonny Tongue's incarceration for draft-dodging, but even its socially-charged message couldn't lift the group beyond regional success. The group's sound incorporated several then-current trends, including baroque-pop, sunshine harmonies, country-rock, electric folk and and old-timey jazz. You can hear influences of the Left Banke, Grass Roots, Blues Project, Lovin' Spoonful and others, and though the band was quite accomplished (especially in flautist Michael Sagarese and bassist Greg Geddes), their lack of a singular style and the novelty of their stage act seem to have relegated them to a footnote. The group continued into the mid-70s in various formations, releasing their own records and backing Todd Rundgren on Back to the Bars, but this 1968 album is the most complete expression of their original concept. Real Gone's first-ever CD reissue includes the album's original ten tracks and a twelve-page booklet with new liner notes by Gene Scalutti. Separated from their stage visuals, the group's music still holds up. 3-1/2 stars, if allowed fractional ratings. [©2013 Hyperbolium]
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By der loewe on January 5, 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
First two songs are haunting and beautiful. The rest is the worst kind of 60s schlock that makes the Monkees sound good.
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