Future Lovecraft and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$7.49
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: small amount of water damages but clean binding & text, tight spine, small amount of wear from previous use.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Future Lovecraft Paperback – November 22, 2011


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, November 22, 2011
$147.44 $7.49
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 294 pages
  • Publisher: Innsmouth Free Press (November 22, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0986686468
  • ISBN-13: 978-0986686467
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,315,213 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This is a quality anthology and worthy of your attention if you're a fan of this genre." - Fame & Fortune

"An unsettling look at humanity's future, and questions if we even have one at all." - Haunted Eyeball

"Let me just say it's brilliantly illustrated and that it did keep me some lovely - and varied - company." - Gnome's Lair

Customer Reviews

I prefer a story with a beginning a middle and an end.
Patrick McMahon
At least most of the authors attempted a fresh take on a subject that is sadly becoming a bit stale due to poor pastiches.
Paul De Bruyn
For a fan of the genres of sci-fi and Lovecraftian horror some stories will be very enjoyable.
Kindle Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By T. Hoch on June 25, 2013
Format: Paperback
Science Fiction and Lovecraft, what more could one want?
I follow Silvia's blog and tweets. She does good work, and produces pretty good material. I saw her plea for honest reviews about this book and decided to purchase it and give it a go. She mentioned this was the highest pirated book out of all of the ones released by her, but also one of the lowest rated.
I think I know why now.

Like many, I picked this up because it was Lovecraftian themed. Anything with Lovecraft in the title will draw the masses of fans, read to get their tentacles onto another collection of fiction that will entice them and make them dream forbidden dreams. Hence the high level of piracy in regards to this book. You tap into something so popular as Lovecraft, and people will come and snap it up as fast as possible. I was excited to read this anthology, especially after having read Space Eldritch (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/16118770-space-eldritch) which in itself was a sci-fi Lovecraftian themed anthology.

Reading this anthology was like riding a roller coaster with huge peaks and very low valleys. There are some really, really good stories in this collection. "In The Hall Of The Yellow King", "The Labyrinth of Sleep", "Deep Blue Dreams", "The Comet Called Ithaqua", and "The Door From Earth" were some of the stories that I enjoyed the most. Wonderfully written, they contained Lovecraftian themes, even the ones that didn't contain his monsters. They were entertaining, understandable, and were a good mix of sci-fi and horror. I will probably go back and read these on a future date if I want to brave the bad stories of this anthology.

And that's where we run into the issue with this anthology.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Paul De Bruyn on July 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Uneven collection of stories based on the Lovecraft mythos. Some are interesting and worth the time, others would be best included in an ezine. At least most of the authors attempted a fresh take on a subject that is sadly becoming a bit stale due to poor pastiches.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Sean Riccio on May 20, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I was given "Future Lovecraft" by a friend who knew my love for both the Mythos and novelty, and it didn't disappoint. There are two stories in particular that really stand out.

Most Lovecraftian stories deal with the horrifying elements being hidden (either by nature or design), or their bursting out into the mundane world with rending, apocalyptic consequences. "In The Hall of the Yellow King" and "Tri-TV" show something I've never seen before in a story involving Lovecraft's nightmares. They show humanity adapting, evolving. Coping. Lovecraft predicted that the oncoming singularity of science in the face of universe's vastness would shatter our feeble minds, but Bobby Cranestone (Tri-TV) and Peter Rawlik (In The Hall of the Yellow King) offer a different hypothesis: that humanity's a tough and at times just-as-insane species as anything else lurking out there in the elder dark. Couldn't recommend the collection enough.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John O Youngblood on June 26, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Most stories here are skin-crawlingly appropriate additions to the HPL mythos. Some are not so much to my liking due to the nature and not the content of the specific story; I don't really care for long poems or stories that are completely stream-of-consciousness. But that's my own personal preference and nothing against the actual objective worth of the form. I actually thought this was a better sequel to Book of Cthulhu than the Book of Cthulhu 2. IMHO, FWIW.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Vesper Aeon on March 25, 2014
Format: Paperback
I discovered the works of H.P. Lovecraft in junior high school when I was helping out during lunch period as a Library Aide. The books had just been re-released by one of the major publishing houses with some sweet cover art by Michael Whelan (if memory serves correctly) and I decided to take a chance. This was like nothing I had ever read before, and I was hooked from the word “GO.” Lovecraft had a way of making you question the very nature of reality and his influence on the world of horror fiction is unquestionable. That influence has extended beyond Weird Fiction to other genres including historical and science fiction. So when I saw “Future Lovecraft” I picked it up to give it a read since it seemed like an interesting concept; the Cthulhu Mythos in the far-flung future.

The trouble with anthologies, however, is that unless you are familiar with the Editor(s) or writers, then your enjoyment of the book is a crapshoot. None of the authors were familiar to me, neither were the editors. Nevertheless, I decided to give it a shot, and for the most part I was satisfied.

Containing a solid mix of poetry and short stories there is some really good stuff in here. And there is some really, really bad stuff in here. The worst one, in my opinion, was “The Library Twins and the Nekrobees” by Martha Hubbard which read like some silly “Cthulhu for Kids” nonsense that just did not cut it for me. Especially when stacked against dark, mesmerizing works like “Do Not Imagine” by Mari Ness and “The Comet Called Ithaqua” by Dan Webb which were true Lovecraftian works of cosmic horror.

A.C. Wise submitted a truly Weird, beautiful piece called “Venice is Burning” which fits the mythos nicely, even if the story itself takes more than one reading to fully digest.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?