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Futurehit.DNA Paperback – September 30, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-0615285702 ISBN-10: 0615285708

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 252 pages
  • Publisher: Futurehit, Inc. (September 30, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0615285708
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615285702
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #149,767 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jay Frank is the Owner and CEO of DigSin, a new singles-focused music company that allows subscribing fans to obtain music for free. DigSin signs new artists to deals that leverage new platforms, social networks and analytics that expose music to a wider audience, building popularity outside of traditional methods.

Frank is also the author of two books. His first book, Futurehit.DNA, is a #1 Songwriting book on Amazon and part of the college curriculum at a number of colleges and universities. The book explores how digital technology has changed the way people discover music and examines what an artist needs to make their song more hitworthy in the digital age. Frank's second book, Hack Your Hit, is a how-to guide for musicians filled with free and cheap marketing tips.

Prior to forming DigSin, Frank was the Senior Vice President of Music Strategy for CMT, an MTV Network. Under Frank's leadership, music video ratings reached all-time highs thanks to an aggressive multi-platform promotional strategy. Frank was also Vice President of Music Programming and Label Relations for Yahoo! Music, responsible for all the company's music programming. He was instrumental in the exponential growth of Yahoo's audience bringing in approximately 25 million people a month. He was also senior music director at The Box Music Network, worked in marketing and A&R for Ignition Records, managed a live music venue, programmed broadcast radio stations and created two local music video shows.

Frank holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Ithaca College in Ithaca, NY and sits on the Board of Directors of the Academy of Country Music, The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee and Leadership Music. Frank also serves on the Tennessee Film, Entertainement and Music Commission, is a co-chair of Leadership Music Digital Summit, and is a consultant at FLO (Thinkery). A respected leader in the music and digital communities, Frank has spoken at such conferences as MIDEM, South By Southwest, Canadian Music Week, ASCAP Expo, MusExpo, Digital Music Forum, CMJ, SF Music Tech Summit, New Music Seminar and Mobile Entertainment Summit, among others.

Frank resides in Nashville with his wife and daughter.

For more information, check out these links:

www.futurehitdna.com
www.twitter.com/futurehitdna

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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DNA is a unique perspective on what may be the best way to make a song a hit.
G.Franklin Rutherford
DNA is the only book I know of that gives you marketing tips from a digital perspective written by a music industry insider that will enable you to make more MONEY!
Kami Knake
If you're a fan of non-fluff books on the music business, e.g. Moses Avalon, then this is a great read.
J. Michael Huey

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kami Knake on January 2, 2010
Format: Paperback
FutureHit.DNA is the only book I know of that gives you marketing tips from a digital perspective written by a music industry insider that will enable you to make more MONEY!

For fans of Seth Godin and Malcolm Gladwell, this book is written in a simple, easy-to-digest manner and offers up great case studies. It will make you think differently about how songs should be structured or why certain songs stick in your head easier than others.

It's perfect for anyone passionate about music creation and music marketing. I market music online for a living and think everyone that works in the music business should read this.

The digital revolution has made music discovery harder. On any given week, 15,000 new songs can be released through legal digital channels. This book analyzes past and present trends and gives great insight into how people listen and consume music today.

For example, in the digital world all songs start at zero seconds. Most listeners will hit the skip button in the first 7 seconds if the song doesn't grab them. Did you know that songs must play for a minimum of sixty seconds to count as a play and generate royalty money?

After reading this book, you will want to make a list of all the tips you discover a for quick reference.

I really believe it will make you look at the song creation process differently and give you a leg up over the competition.

Kami
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By plainhuman on January 17, 2011
Format: Paperback
Frank certainly has the credentials to write this type of work and speak authoritatively. Many of the 15 factors he highlights seem perfectly reasonable. However, there seems to be little statistical data backing any of his theories up. He does attempt to support each factor with anecdotal evidence, but more often than not, he glosses over any potential countervailing trends or evidence with two appeals (i) that these trends will not manifest for 3-5 years or (ii) silence.
Perhaps the book should be focused on identifying trends and themes that arose in pop music in the past, rather than attempting to plot future trends. As a predictive tool, the model holds minimal value. While there is certainly the need to balance creative expression with commercial appeal, its unclear how artists should actually proceed. Should they simply take Frank's advice and write longer songs with more chord changes, that will somehow appeal across traditional genres? If anything, this work could be more effective in combating the mindset of modern (corporate-owned) labels who have attempted to make hits more homogenous across a broad spectrum.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Michael Huey on January 13, 2010
Format: Paperback
As a veteran of the business of music, I can safely say that Jay's book, 'FutureHit.DNA', is well thought-out, researched, and presented.
If you're a fan of non-fluff books on the music business, e.g. Moses Avalon, then this is a great read.
This is not one of those Do-It-Yourself to Fame & Fortune books with cute tips on 'blogging' and 'twittering'.
The book does however offer educated and studied advice that is certainly applicable to artist, writers, publishers, labels, managers, etc . . .
Jay makes some compelling arguments for truly knowing and understanding the new 'art and craft' of having a career in any genre of contemporary music.

Very Well Done~
Michael Huey
HueyTunes
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By hyperbolium on July 18, 2010
Format: Paperback
If you're a musician wondering how to make your music more marketable, or you're a listener wondering how the industry markets to you, industry executive Jay Frank has some interesting insights to share. His central thesis is that changes in technology lead to changes in consumption patterns which necessitate changes in the way music with commercial intentions is created. He covers changes in music delivery (jukeboxes, radio, soundtracks, commercials, iPods, video games), creation technologies (live, recorded, multi-tracked, DIY studios), and the industry's business models. He provides specific suggestions for making your music saleable amid the changing landscapes.

Frank doesn't purport to make your music more artistic; instead, he suggests how to make your output catch and retain someone's attention - be they radio or digital stream listeners, the CD/MP3-buying public, a radio station's music director, or a television show's music coordinator. In that sense, he's a hit-song mercenary, but after reading his book you'll understand that getting heard amid the fire hose of music passing through the Internet isn't always a simple task of just making great music. His analysis of industry changes suggests the impact they've had on song construction. He explains the results of transitioning from 78s to 45s to LPs, describes how listening habits and hit selection were altered by the 45 changer, and why song intros grew longer as automated programming systems favored records that left more room for ads to be read live by DJs.

The need to make your songs catchy and sticky is underlined by the ease with which modern listeners can change channel (due to digital radio tuners) and instantly skip a song (due to the capacities of MP3 players and streaming music services).
Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By TR on March 20, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Really great book. Provides a lot of insight. If you write music, perform music, or work within he music industry this is a must read!
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