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GB84 (Revolutionary Writing) Paperback – January 1, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber (2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571258204
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571258208
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,542,031 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By HelenNZ on September 6, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you want a book that is politically fascinating, that makes you angry and keeps you reading, this is it. The multiple voices used by David Peace make this a mosaic of possible interpretations of the 1984 miner's strike in Great Britain. This strike tore the heart out of the union movement, and pretty much ended coal mining in the UK. It reads like a mystery novel, with level after level of intrigue being exposed. And it keeps you turning the pages.
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By Alex Abbott on December 6, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a bleak novel about Thatcher's Britain and the hopeless miners' strike of 84. It explores the limits of human endurance in the face of indifference from fellow countrymen, police brutality and personal betrayal. Not an easy read but it rings true.
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7 of 13 people found the following review helpful By John Barkley on January 2, 2006
Format: Paperback
I was born during the miners' strike and have spent most of my life in Ossett, where Peace originates from. The book was very interesting just to learn about the events as they unfolded and the mood of the coalfields. Most young people are now quite poorly informed of the strike, especially in areas that actually have recovered like this fine town.

At times, the language conveys feelings of anger, frustration and despair wonderfully. The main characters are:

Terry - an N.U.M. official

"The Jew" - an anti-strike journalist with links to organised crime

Neil - taxi driver for "The Jew"

"The Mechanic" - a mysterious criminal, who sometimes does work for British national security

Martin and Peter - two pickets from Thurcroft colliery at the southern edge of Yorkshire, close to strike-breaking Nottinghamshire

It's good to get a broad range of views. The back of the book reads "The miners' strike. The government against the people." This suggested to me that the book was likely to be a pro-strike view. Seeing as it suggests that the government employed gangsters to help break the strike, this would seem to be true, although there were parts of the book when I did forget this. Some accounts of violence against working miners were written in such a way that I'm sure Peace was appalled by them - the two most notorious being the beating of a man in his home in Castleford and the murder of a taxi driver who escorted a miner to work.

There were some things that annoyed me, though. One big thing is that Peace likes to write like, "Neil did this. Neil did that. Neil gave up. Neil went home. etc. etc." He certainly doesn't like pronouns, which is a shame.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Collier on December 29, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This item was just as it was described in the posting and I was very happy with the quality. Thanks!
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