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74 of 79 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good replacement for indoor flood lights
Overall, these bulbs are good replacements for typical incandescent flood lights. The amount of light they put out is comparable.

These are also the first fluorescent flood lights I have found which work with dimmer switches. So a couple plusses in their favor.

There are a couple important differences between these bulbs and a typical incandescent...
Published on August 1, 2006 by Gary Minnaert

versus
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Old and slow
I bought 6 and they showed up in good shape and quickly. One died after 2 hours of use! They are an old design and take a long time to get going. Not what I expected. The new bulbs are much quicker that I buy at Home Depot etc.
Published on November 5, 2010 by Daniel T. Kigin


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74 of 79 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good replacement for indoor flood lights, August 1, 2006
By 
Gary Minnaert (Los Angeles, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Overall, these bulbs are good replacements for typical incandescent flood lights. The amount of light they put out is comparable.

These are also the first fluorescent flood lights I have found which work with dimmer switches. So a couple plusses in their favor.

There are a couple important differences between these bulbs and a typical incandescent bulbs:

1) they are more expensive

2) they have about a 1/2 second 'pause' when turning on. When hooked up to the same switch, an incandescent bulb will come on first, by maybe a half second. More of a small annoyance than anything, but the expectation is immediate light when you flip the switch

3) there is a 'warm up' time before these bulbs emit their full light output. Probably 90 seconds before they are 100%. They start at probably 70%.

4) these bulbs work with a dimmer switch, but the levels are different than a typical bulb. They probably range between 20% and 100%, whereas a typical bulb would go from 1% - 100%.

Overall, I am satisfied. They use less energy, put out the same light and work with dimmers.
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34 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Barely distinguishable from the original, August 31, 2011
By 
Omar Y. (San Francisco, CA) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This is as good as it gets for CFL bulbs. I don't know if it's the glass enclosure or the bulb itself, but you can barely tell that this is a CFL when you look at it compared to the other incandescent bulbs that are still on my ceiling. GE really does a good job of taking the complaints about CFL bulbs (too bright, too cold, etc.) and making them go away. That said, it is still a CFL. When I first turned it on it took a second or two to warm up. But it wasn't that noticeable, and in the dark my eyes could use the time to adjust anyway. With Amazon Prime's free shipping, it will be even easier for me to grab these one at a time as I need them to replace my original bulbs, and it's great that I'll be able to use one-fourth the energy with something nearly as good.

Among GE R30 floodlight CFL bulbs, this is the one you want if you want the shortest warm-up time. It's not dimmable, but for recessed lights attached to regular switches, it does its job well. If you want something dimmable, check out the 21710. If you want to go even greener, check out the 47478. It's not dimmable, but it uses half the mercury and lasts about 50 percent longer.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Welcome to the world of CFL lighting, January 26, 2013
By 
John S. Reid (Spokane, WA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Welcome to the world of CFL ("compact fluorescent lighting") bulbs. Great lighting, great energy savings, but you have to deal with that darned warm-up time! But, if you want energy savings AND instant-on, you pretty much have to go with LED ("light emitting diode") bulbs. I have tried LED floods (at least I did 2 years ago - I understand that they have improved quite a bit since then - see more on this below), but at the time I decided to live with the warm-up time of the CFL floods because: (1) the LED floods had too narrow of a beam; (2) the LED floods have too "cold" of a light (they typically have a light temperature of close to 5000K, which is well into the blue range of the spectrum, whereas the CLFs can be had in the "warm" 2700K light-yellow spectrum, which pretty much mimics the incandescent bulbs most of us have grown up with and become accustomed to); and (3) the LED floods cost a LOT more.

I now understand that you can get a 12W 60 degree LED flood with a "warm light" temperature spectrum near the 2700K range, so two out of my three problems with LED bulbs have been solved (i.e., 60 degree flood angle is great, and 2700K light spectrum is great). However, there is still the problem of cost. An LED flood bulb (a 30PAR LED 60 degree flood bulb with an output equivalent to a 75W incandescent bulb) costs an amazing $71! (By comparison, I can buy a 3-year CFL 15W 30PAR flood bulb (equivalent to about a 65W incandescent flood) for about $6 each.) Of note, the LED bulb should have a life of 50,000 hours, as compared to a life of about 6000 hours for the CFL bulb. So maybe over 30 years the LED bulb will prove to be more "economical", but I'm guessing that in the next 5-10 years there will be more improvements in technology such that the cost of the LED bulbs will decrease significantly. So, my recommendation is to go with the CFL bulbs at this time, save your money, and wait for the next "revolution" in energy-efficient lighting.

To be honest, if you are concerned about the "war on incandescent bulbs" (as I am), your best approach is as follows: (1) stock-up on those standard incandescent bulbs that are of odd shapes and the like (which may be required to fit antique lighting fixtures, or even certain lighting fixtures put in place in the last 20 years, including chandelier lighting) in order to ensure that you will have an inventory of incandescent bulbs to fit your needs for at least the next 10 years (i.e., time enough for the next evolution of lighting to come along); (2) look for (and purchase) "long-life" (e.g., 10 year) incandescent bulbs (including those with krypton gas filling) while they are still available; (3) replace incandescent bulbs with CFL bulbs in those locations where warm-up time is not a concern (such as kitchen lighting); and (4) if you can, invest in at least one LED light (perhaps something along the lines of a $50 6W LED (equivalent to a 60W incandescent table lamp bulb) just so that you can evaluate for yourself how well an LED stacks up to a CFL and/or an incandescent bulb.

As for outdoor lighting, and in particular safety lighting (which typically requires "instant-on" illumination in response to a motion sensor), you MUST stick with incandescent, LED or halogen bulbs at this time (so stock-up on them while you can) - the "wait time" for a outdoor CFL in this application is just too long (and particularly in cold weather environments).

(As an aside, in addition to stocking up on incandescent light bulbs, consider stocking up on halogen light bulbs while they are still available - they offer great illumination and relatively long life, but no energy efficiency.)

In the end, the best approach is to think about your current lighting needs (indoor vs. outdoor, room by room, and lighting-fixture by lighting-fixture), and to anticipate your lighting needs in each application. Replace old incandescent bulbs with high efficiency CLF or LED bulbs where you can (and where you are willing to), but in the end it might be best to stock-up on bulbs that cannot currently be replaced (at least within the next 10 years). If you have a 10-year stock of light bulbs to meet your current needs, it is most likely that something new will come along within that time such that any inventory of bulbs you have beyond that point will be obsolete. There will always be a need for light bulbs, and any new technology will ultimately replace current technology over a period of time - all you need to do is provide yourself with a stock of your currently most favorable light bulbs to see you through any 10 year transition period (or 20 years, if you are paranoid like I am).
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Old and slow, November 5, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I bought 6 and they showed up in good shape and quickly. One died after 2 hours of use! They are an old design and take a long time to get going. Not what I expected. The new bulbs are much quicker that I buy at Home Depot etc.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars love the color, September 9, 2011
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This review is from: GE Lighting 78951 Energy Smart CFL 15-Watt (65-watt replacement) 650-Lumen R30 Floodlight Bulb with Medium Base, 2-Pack (Tools & Home Improvement)
I love the bright day like light these make but they do take quite a bit of time to warm up to a full light. The yellowish lights we had before were horrible. I wish they came right on and not needed to warm up but I hope they last the 6 years as they are in a room with very high ceilings and it is a pain to change them. The other lightbulbs we had were dying in 3-6 months. I know another poster disliked the color of the light but it feels like day when they are on and it is PERFECT in our home! I don't think it feel office like at all but bright and cheery!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars High quality light output, Daylight quality, Sloooow to warm up, January 26, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: GE Lighting 78951 Energy Smart CFL 15-Watt (65-watt replacement) 650-Lumen R30 Floodlight Bulb with Medium Base, 2-Pack (Tools & Home Improvement)
I am very pleased with these lights. I have 8 in recessed lights in my kitchen in the R30 size and three in over the sink R20 size. The light output is great. The difference between these daylight bulbs and regular CFL floods is off the charts. Our kitchen looks so much better when rendered in full high quality daylight bulbs.

Consumer reports had an interesting article last month on bulbs. One of the points they made was that many bulbs have a long warm up period. These bulbs fall into that category. They can take almost a full minute to gain full light output. The other point that they made was that if you want your CFL's to last you should NOT turn them off if you are returning to the room in roughly 15 minutes. The rapid on off cycling will diminish the life expectancy of the bulb... and based upon my experience with CFLs I believe them.

I also bought two of these to use with my Alvin lights that I use on my drafting/art table. The pure light they render is wonderful.

I do not know how long they will last...... I will try and update this review when and if any of them go dead. The main point for me was that 1. I got them at a good price. 2. Shipping was free 3. The light output has changed the look of both my kitchen and work area in such a positive fashion that it is a win/win proposition.
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29 of 35 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars unacceptable delay and warmup time, December 23, 2007
I have reviewed this bulb for a similar listing on Amazon, but my basic points are as follows:

I am a huge fan of CFLs. We use them all over our house. You should, too. There is really no reason to go incandescent anymore. You may actually be better off throwing out your incandescents BEFORE they burn out, and replacing them with CFLs. CFLs work equivalently to incandescents; you just have to know what to look for: low color temperature (on the order of 2700K), a bulb to match the application. Two years ago, after burning multiple incandescents out in our garage door opener, I installed CFLs. They are sturdy enough to withstand the vibrations and have been going strong for a couple of years.

This bulb is unacceptable. It has the drawbacks of CFLs that I bought in the mid-90s: a delay when you switch them on, and a long warmup period (some reviewers say that it is 1 minute; it took my bulb 2-3 minutes. These are the qualities that made it hard for me to convert my wife and my parents to CFLs.

I would recommend trying different brands of dimmables until you find one that is compatible with your dimmers and doesn't have any significant drawbacks. i can't believe that GE let this bulb hit the market with such a switching delay and long warmup time. Reminds me of the disappointment I felt with the early generation CFLs, but I believe that these dimmable bulbs will eventually get the rough spots ironed out.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Starts Slow, December 20, 2012
This bulb takes a couple seconds to come on, then up to a couple minutes to come to full brightness. I replaced three can lights near each other in the kitchen, and all three bulbs take the same time to come to full brightness. Other manufacturer's CFL products come on immediately.

There are some R30 CFL bulbs that are 14W and some 15W. When you make a purchase, make sure to check two specifications for the bulb - (in GE's words) Light Appearance and Brightness. Look for the temperature in degrees Kelvin. The lower the number, the more yellow the light. And the higher the wattage, usually the light output goes up, measured in lumens. Match these two specifications when purchasing bulbs from different manufacturers.

GE has recently changed the packaging to all cardboard for UPC# 043168729840. They are easier to open than the plastic blister packaging. Check pricing at other sources like Wal-Mart - three 2-packs (6 bulbs) for $25.11 in a single case.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Ridiculously long warm-up time, May 21, 2012
By 
Bill (Seattle, WA) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
We recently moved into a condominium built by someone absolutely in love with can lights--literally dozens of them throughout the three floors of the unit with a 65W incandescent bulb in each and every one on move-in. We initially replaced the incandescent bulbs with these compact fluorescents, GE 13-Watt Energy SmartTM 60 Watt Replacement - 2 Packs of 8 Bulbs - 16 Total Bulbs, and while we were very satisfied with how quickly they turned on, the color temperature, and the amount of light emitted, we didn't like the look of spiral CFL bulbs sticking out of the cans. We then bought these floodlight CFL bulbs to get the same light output and color temperature but in floodlight form. While they put out great light, it takes an extremely long time--often 60-90 seconds--for them to warm to full output; we joke that we have to turn on our lights and walk away for a few minutes so that they can "boot up." While the first generation of CFL bulbs behaved like this, CFL technology has advanced to the point where this is now absolutely unacceptable. For the cost premium (almost 500% more expensive per bulb vs. the spirals we initially installed), we expected much, much better and will not be purchasing these again when and if they burn out.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Nice light, but does not dim, February 22, 2009
The light output luminosity and color temperature is great. It is much better than my original 65W incandescent.

The lamp is dimmable, but I could only get it to about 70% on both my 600W Lutron linear slider and 1000W Lutron rotary dimmer, which is unacceptable. I did not notice any buzzing or flickering when dimming, though at its lowest setting, the CFL tube on the inside had a plasma ball look with the gasses swirling around and a slight purplish tint.

The real deal killer was that it is 1/2" longer than the existing bulb and even with my Halo recessed can on the largest bulb setting, it stuck out beyond the baffle trim and looked awful.
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