Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga

July 10, 2007 | Format: MP3

$5.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:55
30
2
3:34
30
3
3:08
30
4
3:36
30
5
3:30
30
6
3:39
30
7
3:42
30
8
3:03
30
9
4:54
30
10
3:25

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 10, 2007
  • Label: Merge Records
  • Copyright: 2007 Merge Records
  • Total Length: 36:26
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000U7SMKS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (86 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,400 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

It's different, but Spoon makes this album work!
FizzWiz
"Gimme Fiction" was a great album, and last summer the band released their sixth album.
Paul Allaer
It's one of those albums, you can just listen to through and through.
C. Dunken

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Simone Oltolina on August 24, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Life might be full of disappointments but, quite on the contrary, through the years Spoon have proved a reliable source of enjoyment for me.

You might ask: what separates this band from thousands of other samey so-called indie bands? Lo-fi sound & look? checked. Praise from Pitchfork? Checked. Casual name-dropping by other indie acts/scenesters? Checked. Still, despite all evidence of the contrary, Spoon really manage to be one of a kind.
What makes them stand apart is what I used to call their trademark "coitus interruptus" sound, meaning infectious hooks that never really takes off and turn into a full-fledged chorus, remaining instead a hint, a tease to the ear.
This was especially apparent on one of their previous LPs, "Kill the moonlight", also a favourite of mine (not to say, the album through which I convinced most of my friends that this was truly a great band).
Beware, it is true that this album makes a few concessions to the classic song structure, thus slightly deviating from the aforementioned c.t. sound but, in the end, it's still there. Melodies that all sudden swerve to a different direction, riffs that instead of exploding into the boombastic apex you'd expext, implode or morph into something else.

I love this band and I think that this album will easily prove to be one of my favourite of the year (along with Blitzen Trapper's 'Wild Mountain Nation', for those interested).
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By ATeacherFromFlorida on July 10, 2007
Format: Audio CD
(Ga X 5)offers a logical progression in Spoon's already impressive discography. If critics level any criticism at this new album, most likely it will involve damning Spoon's consistency because there aren't any geniune surprises on this album. Well, so what? I consider their ability to put out one satisfying album after another surprise enough. They've found their niche---oblique, angular, and aurally textured pop-rock---and I think they're wise to stick to it.

(Ga X 5) successfully offers a hybrid of the sounds from the last few albums (Kill the Moonlight and Gimme Fiction) and as usual you can detect the often-noted influences ranging from the Kinks to Wire to, yes, Van Morrison (give "The Underdog" a spin to hear the VM influence.) Granted, the disc is short, clocking in at just over 30 minutes, but this is also in a way a sign of the band's restraint. They know what they do well, and here they're at the zenith of their powers. Even the odder, more difficult and cubist tracks in the record's middle dintinguish themselves as worthy slow-burners after repeated listens.

In short, definitely one of their best discs. You won't be disappointed. I hope they continue making discs like this for many years to come.
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Format: Audio CD
I'll start this review by first saying that I've never even bought nor heard a full Spoon album prior to purchasing the exceptional GA GA GA GA GA. What turned me on to the band was a promotional download I received for the single from Spoon's GIMME FICTION, "I Turn My Camera On". I missed out on actually buying GIMME FICTION (which I still want to pick it up), but I didn't want to miss the opportunity to buy the much anticipated follow-up album. It is brief, but despite its brevity, it is consistent from top to bottom, beginning to finish. Can you say f@#&!*) brilliant?

My favorite numbers here are "Don't Make Me A Target" which serves as an exceptional opener. "The Ghost Of You Lingers" is incredibly outside of the box, but the piano-centric production and the indie-quality of the track are unmistakibly brilliant. What is most potent for me concerning "Don't Make Me A Target" is the fact that it may be the most credible tone-poem I've heard for a while; the reverb with Britt Daniel's vocals represents the sound of a ghost. "Don't You Evah" and "Rhythm and Soul" are great as well but nothing steals the thunder of the absolutely marvelous Jon Brion (the man's a genius) helmed "Underdog" which gives Spoon's infectious "I Turn My Camera On" a serious run for its money, and that is saying a lot. Though I've lauded specific tracks, I think the album as a whole is a masterpiece, specifically for all us guys who have a soft-spot in our musical hearts for indie-rock music. One of 2007's best is presented via GA GA GA GA GA ladies and gents! 4 stars.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A. Corvey on July 9, 2007
Format: Audio CD
With the release of "Gimme Fiction" in 2005, I was convinced Spoon had made their masterpiece. It was the perfect combination of previously established elements: the sketch-like song structure and wild experimentation of 2002's "Kill the Moonlight" coupled with the flat-out cathartic pop of 2001's "Girls Can Tell." The songs (penned by vocalist/guitarist Britt Daniel) were simple and direct, yet imbued with an intensity of emotion not often found in modern music (or at least not as genuinely). The record was Daniel's shining moment as a songwriter; his definitive musical statement, one I thought he'd struggle to re-create throughout the rest of his sure to be long career. I never dreamt in a million years that he'd somehow surpass it. Especially on the follow-up album.

"Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga" is that culmination, a record of monumental emotional depth that also manages to genuinely rock. While listening to tracks like the Jon Brion produced "The Underdog," it's apparent that Spoon is yet again breaking new ground, opening up their sound and exploring new territory while still adhering to the tried and true "Spoon" philosophy: simple and direct song-writing that packs an emotional punch. If you're tired of the vacuous music populating today's airwaves then give "Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga" a spin. You won't be disappointed.
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