Buy Used
$0.01
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ex-Library Book - will contain Library Markings. Light shelving wear with minimal damage to cover and bindings. Pages show minor use. Help save a tree. Buy all your used books from Green Earth Books. Read. Recycle and Reuse.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Gabriel's Lament (King Penguin) Paperback – June 3, 1988


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, June 3, 1988
$20.95 $0.01
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Rosie Effect
Bill Gates calls it "profound" -- check out Graeme Simsion's sequel to best seller "The Rosie Project," available now. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: King Penguin
  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; 1St Edition edition (June 3, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140100156
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140100150
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1 x 5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,455,350 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this "exotic" treatment of English eccentricity at its manic extreme, the reticent narrator, Gabriel Harvey, tells of his agonized efforts to come to terms with the loss of his mother, and of his appalling father. PW lauded Bailey's shining dialogue and his "word-perfect" character sketches.
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Bailey has fashioned an awkward buildungsroman in this, his sixth novel and the first to be published in America. The young man is Gabriel Harvey, an aspiring writer who believes his eccentricity and isolation are due to the dark influences of an uneducated, boorish father and a mother who disappeared when he was 13. The people Gabriel meets when he leaves home offer glimpses of the poorer classes in London, but they never become more than caricatures. Gabriel himself is a pale presence, becoming so obsessed with the memory of his mother that he imagines conversations with her ghost. The prose style is strained, either too precious or too tinged with self-pity to evoke pathos. Not a recommended purchase. Lucinda Ann Peck, Learning Design Associates, Gahanna, Ohio
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lawrence W. Prichard on August 27, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This wonderful book was nominated ('shortlisted") for England's Booker Prize, a major British literary award. Gabirel Harvey is the son of an elderly, emotionally tyrannical father, and a sprightly young mother. Oswald and Amy are mismatched.The live a scraping-by existence in Postwar Britain, (the novel ends in the early 1980s). until Oswald comes into a fortune.Instead of being delighted with the money, Amy chafes under Oswald's flowering pretensions. She leaves abrubtly just before Gabriel's thirteenth birthday.Gabirel descends into a proverbial decline, but through common sense and wit, collects a great deal of experience, while waiting to hear directly from his mother.Bailey's description of London and its characters is insighful and zesty. We lean about Oswald's secrets. He claims to be an honest man, but it is revelaed near the end that he is anything but honest. This book is a well balanced combination of humor and sadness.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By algo41 on December 21, 2004
Format: Paperback
The protagonist is a "Mommy's" boy, whose mother deserts him when he is 12. Not a very promising subject for a novel, and in fact, the early part of the novel is unappealing. Then Bailey works his magic. Gabriel's Lament is filled with characters, mostly misfits, as is the protagonist, really, who are full of life. Most notable is Gabriel's father, kind of an Archie Bunker type. The conflict and tension between Gabriel and his father gives substance to this work. As in two other Bailey novels which I have read, the story is told looking back, but it is mostly linear in time, and does not display the technical virtuosity of "Kitty and Virgil": for new Bailey readers, I would recommend that work first.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?