Start reading Galapagos: A Novel (Delta Fiction) on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

Galapagos: A Novel (Delta Fiction) [Kindle Edition]

Kurt Vonnegut
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (220 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $16.00
Kindle Price: $5.99
You Save: $10.01 (63%)
Sold by: Random House LLC

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Literature & Fiction Books for $1.99 Each
Now through November 14, select literature & fiction Kindle books are $1.99 each. Browse the full selection to find your next great read.

Book Description

Galápagos takes the reader back one million years, to A.D. 1986. A simple vacation cruise suddenly becomes an evolutionary journey. Thanks to an apocalypse, a small group of survivors stranded on the Galápagos Islands are about to become the progenitors of a brave, new, and totally different human race. In this inimitable novel, America’s master satirist looks at our world and shows us all that is sadly, madly awry–and all that is worth saving.


Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

YA Leon Trout, the ghost of a decapitated shipbuilder, narrates the humorous, ironic and sometimes carping decline of the human race, as seen through the eyes and minds of the survivors of a doomed cruise to the Galapagos Islands. Vonnegut's cast of unlikely Adams and Eves setting out in a Noah's ark includes Mary Hepburn, an American biology teacher and recent widow; Zenji Hiroguchi, a Japanese computer genius (who does not make it to the ship, although his language-translating and quotation-spouting computer does); his wife, Hisako, carrying radiated genes from the atomic bombs; James Wait, who has made a fortune marrying elderly women; and Captain Aolph von Kleist. Also included: six orphaned girls of the Kana-bono cannibal tribe, who will become the founding mothers of the fisherfolk after bacteria render all other women infertile. Serious fans of Vonnegut's wry and ribald prose will welcome this tale of the devolution of superbrained humans into gentle swimmers with small brains, but others may find this Darwinian survival tale too packed with ecological and sociological details that trap the story line in a series of literary devices, albeit very clever ones. Mary T. Gerrity, Queen Anne School, Upper Marlboro, Md.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

For many Vonnegut fans, Galapagos will be a disappointment. The story is set ``one million years ago, back in 1986 A.D.'' and concerns the maiden voyage of the Bahia de Darwin to the Galapa gos Islands. The narrator is a ghost, and the main characters are those involved with the cruise. As the narrative devel ops, we learn that people have evolved from having ``big brains'' that always get them in trouble, to creatures with flippersbut they keep getting eaten by sharks. The narration jumps back and forth between past and future, so that there is no real sense of what life is like in the ``present'' of the story, and it is difficult to grasp what these new hu mans are really like. Vonnegut's usual stylistic devices just don't work here. Buy for demand. Susan Avallone, ``Library Journal''
Copyright 1985 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product Details

  • File Size: 1171 KB
  • Print Length: 338 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: B005HBRHGC
  • Publisher: The Dial Press; Reissue edition (August 11, 2009)
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002KJA978
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #85,768 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?.


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
40 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Galapagos aint half bad! May 24, 2001
By Jason
Format:Paperback
I'm really surprised to see so many people who consider Galapagos to be one of Vonnegut's worst novels. I love his work and I've read many others... I have to say Galapagos is one of my favorites. On the surface, the unconventional style is great. It's told from a million years in the future, with events revealed in non-cronological order. This nonlinear storytelling really drives home Vonnegut's philosophies about the meaninglessness of time (as in Slaughterhouse Five and Sirens of Titan, for example). Also, the grandiose nature of his plot is great. The end of the world and the human race as we know it... typical Vonnegut, but still good stuff. Above all, this book is very funny. As in his other books, he treats such serious matters as war and death lightly. This underlying irony is very present in Galapagos. However, Galapagos is by no means a "light" book. The subtlest twinge of sadness peeks through all of the humor -- just enough sadness to leave an impact. On another level, Galapagos is great for its concept. The human race is only screwing itself over, and it's about time it starts going backwards again. The pessimism of it all is delightful, yet rings true. My one gripe with Galapagos is its weak character development. In a way this is OK, as it reinforces the message of the human race as a lost cause. However, it would have been nice to have someone, anyone, to sympathize with. But in the end Galapagos is interesting, funny, unconventional, and just a great read.
Was this review helpful to you?
38 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My Big Brain . . . February 19, 2007
By CV Rick
Format:Paperback
You know what my big brain told me to do? It told me to read all the Vonnegut I could get my hands on, and my big brain finally got something right. More social commentary from the master of fiction with a message, Galapagos tells the story of the last band of humans and how they evolve, absent technology.

What's the cause of all human misery? An oversized brain, which brings up the book's tagline - My Big Brain Told Me To . . .

What would humans be like without this oversized brain? What would the earth be like without a species with an oversized brain? These are the questions Vonnegut explores in depth.

As usual, Vonnegut's narrator is a master satirist with a rambling tone who seems to be going in wrong directions, but ties all threads together brilliantly. In this book, the narrator is the son of Kilgore Trout, a frequently recurring character in Vonnegut novels.

I don't think it's the best Vonnegut novel which makes it merely fantastic.

- CV Rick
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars People Still Laugh July 7, 2006
Format:Paperback
"And people still laugh about as much as they ever did, despite their shrunken brains. If a bunch of them are lying around on a beach, and one of them farts, everybody else around laughs and laughs, just as people would have done a million years ago."

Galapagos was the very first Kurt Vonnegut book that I ever read- serendipity saw me come across it at the school library when I was thirteen years old. Thirteen years later I don't think a more glorious introduction could have been made.

You know what is going to happen right from the beginning, the ghost of Leon Trout (son of fictitious sci-fi author Kilgore Trout) has no qualms about informing you of how, a million years in the future (well, 999,980 if you consider that most of the events were meant to have taken place in 1986), the Laws of Natural Section have seen human beings evolve, their Big Brains shrinking and their bodies adapting to a life of fishing and copulation on the Galapagos Archipelago. The tale that follows then is the story of how `modern' humans came to be, the chronicle of the few passengers who stole away from a dying planet on the Bahia de Darwin and found themselves stranded on a volcanic rock for the remainder of their lives and thus making them the Adam and Eves of a new world where children are furry and have flippers.

It isn't just about Natural Selection, but an array of other subjects that are too far reaching to go into now, but would make it an enjoyable book to study further. He does make it clear that we don't fit into this world and we are destroying it, that our big brains cause most of the problems in the world and it would be much easier if we evolved to the same level as the animals that surround us.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An author that grows on you.... April 7, 2002
Format:Paperback
Vonnegut is an author that really grows on me. Galapagos is the latest novel that I've read, and (like the rest of his) immediately becomes my favorite.
The premise of the book is that humanity is going to make an enormous change of genetic course due in part to it's own stupidity. The onion is peeled, and the story reveals more about the problems in humanity while following the story of the future common parents of mankind.
The book maintains several consistencies with Vonnegut's other works:
- A witty style that covers sharp criticism. (Like they've said of Twain, "They'd hang him if they thought he was serious")
- A satire that's sometimes obvious, but sometimes hiding behind the story.
- Cameos by characters from his other books.
- A solid criticism of modern societyu
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Like all Kurt Vonnegut's books very funny and thought provoking.
Published 17 hours ago by Jay M. Beach
3.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyed the humor
Kind of confusing, but I had to finish it. Enjoyed the humor.
Published 4 days ago by Carol Kase
4.0 out of 5 stars Quotes and Big Brains
KVJ was a great philosopher and this book takes a good look at humanity and how our big brains keep causing trouble. Read more
Published 17 days ago by Krister Rollins
4.0 out of 5 stars Strangely intrigueing
A different, darkly humorous, but spell binding look into the future, a million years after 1996. Vonnegut tells this imaginary tale through the eyes of a ghost; a tale of how the... Read more
Published 1 month ago by John Yuill
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
A great read to take along on any trip, especially one to the Galapagos!
Published 1 month ago by Mary Ann Brownstein
4.0 out of 5 stars Vonnegut fans of course will love it. Others probably won't get it
Interesting novel. Vonnegut fans of course will love it. Others probably won't get it.
Published 1 month ago by mars198
2.0 out of 5 stars Kurt needs to go back to the SHROOMS he was taking before he wrote...
Definitely NOT Kurt's best effort. I highly recommend HOCUS POCUS. GALAPAGOS is slow slow slow to start... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Jeff
5.0 out of 5 stars and Galapagos is my second favorite after Slaughterhouse 5
I've been on a Vonnegut binge lately, and Galapagos is my second favorite after Slaughterhouse 5. Like other Vonnegut stories, Galapagos takes the reader on an unpredictable,... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Craig Finley
1.0 out of 5 stars This is the first Kurt Vonnegut book I have read ...
This is the first Kurt Vonnegut book I have read and thus I was not prepared for his style of writing. It was not to my taste.
Published 1 month ago by Butch
3.0 out of 5 stars If the book was been half as long and been a better read.
I think I might have outgrown Vonnegut his rambling style got tedious. Or maybe it is just this book written from the prospective of a ghost with a time span of a million years. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Ani-Mae
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

More About the Author

Kurt Vonnegut was born in Indianapolis in 1922. He studied at the universities of Chicago and Tennessee and later began to write short stories for magazines. His first novel, Player Piano, was published in 1951 and since then he has written many novels, among them: The Sirens of Titan (1959), Mother Night (1961), Cat's Cradle (1963), God Bless You Mr Rosewater (1964), Welcome to the Monkey House; a collection of short stories (1968), Breakfast of Champions (1973), Slapstick, or Lonesome No More (1976), Jailbird (1979), Deadeye Dick (1982), Galapagos (1985), Bluebeard (1988) and Hocus Pocus (1990). During the Second World War he was held prisoner in Germany and was present at the bombing of Dresden, an experience which provided the setting for his most famous work to date, Slaughterhouse Five (1969). He has also published a volume of autobiography entitled Palm Sunday (1981) and a collection of essays and speeches, Fates Worse Than Death (1991).

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Look for Similar Items by Category