Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Galen's Prophecy: Temperament In Human Nature Paperback – February 7, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-0813333557 ISBN-10: 0813333555

30 New from $35.67 24 Used from $19.56 1 Collectible from $79.57
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, February 7, 1997
$35.67 $19.56
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Psychological Memoirs & Case Studies
Browse a selection of our favorite new Psychological Memoir & Case Study titles.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Gold Box Deal of the Day: Best-Selling Paranormal Series
Today only, books in the Vampire Academy and Bloodlines series by Richelle Mead are $2.99 each. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Westview Press (February 7, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813333555
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813333557
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #430,400 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Harvard cognitive psychologist Kagan adds a new twist to the nature-nurture controversy in this challenging academic study. Second-century Greek physician Galen posited innate, distinct human temperaments--melancholy, sanguine, choleric, phlegmatic--thought to result from imbalances in bodily humors. Carl Jung carried forward Galen's ideas by asserting that people are born as introverts or extroverts. Though the concept of inherited personality has fallen out of favor, research studies done during the last 15 years by Kagan and others reveal that an infant's fearful or relaxed reaction to novel stimuli is a predictor of whether that child will develop into a sensitive, introverted or a bold, outgoing adult. Kagan believes we each inherit unique neurochemistries that predispose us to becoming inhibited or uninhibited types. He offers tantalizing speculations on how innate temperaments might affect vocational and marital choices, criminality, ethical stances, psychopathology and parenting.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Kagan, one of the world's eminent developmental psychologists, has argued for several decades that human nature is not infinitely malleable. In this book he discusses a project he has led for the past 15 years involving the study of toddlers who demonstrated two temperamental extremes: the inhibited (shy and withdrawn) and the uninhibited (placid and outgoing). Kagan's research uncovered a significant pattern of behavioral and physiological differences distinguishing these two groups from earliest infancy and found that these traits tend to persist at least into early adolescence. He includes a history of the idea of temperament and discusses the political implications of his work. This book is a vital purchase for all academic libraries supporting courses in developmental or personality psychology. Public libraries can probably make do with Kagan's earlier book, The Nature of the Child (LJ 9/15/84), which covers the research in less detail.
Mary Ann Hughes, Neill P.L., Pullman, Wash.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Jaye Smith on May 3, 2005
Format: Paperback
Galen's Prophecy was a stretch for my intellect; it is, afterall, a presentation of scientific research. However, when it was written (early to mid-1990's), it was cutting-edge research in temperament. At the time, I was desperate for answers about the agonies of anxiety and shyness that colored my childhood and followed me into adulthood. It was personally liberating to read Kagan's solid evidence that we are born with our temperamental tendencies. In our culture, where extroversion is desired and rewarded, it's easy for we introverts to feel inadequate or flawed. Kagan's research has paved the way for newer books on shyness and tempereament written for the lay person. Extroverts may never understand the debt of gratitude we introverts owe to Dr. Kagan.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For we folks who feel that we are born "a blank slate", that our ability to live is mainly learned from our environment, Kagan will show how wrong we are. The inborn genetic influence with which we enter this world determines how we act, think, work, and relate to others throughout our lives, despite current thinking that training and experience from birth are all important.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 4, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is a must read for anyone who wishes to understand the individual differences in people. Kagan, a Havard Professor, fills this book with information relevant to all areas in psychology. I referred to it many time for my thesis.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Bert Wiefels on November 30, 2004
Format: Paperback
The author is all over the place. He skips around so much that the first couple of chapters come across like a bunch of unconnected cliches. I am usually a positive reviewer, but this book reminded me of the kind of garbage college students write when they don't know what they are talking about. Sorry professor.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?