Galileo and the Scientific Revolution and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$9.20
Qty:1
  • List Price: $12.95
  • Save: $3.75 (29%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Galileo and the Scientific Revolution Paperback – September 17, 2003


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$0.01
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.20
$7.64 $2.67
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$5.95


Frequently Bought Together

Galileo and the Scientific Revolution + Galileo
Price for both: $18.19

Buy the selected items together
  • Galileo $8.99

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications (September 17, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0486432262
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486432267
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.1 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,063,937 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Srinivasan Nenmeli Krishna on November 30, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What a great book on Galileo told in an interesting story-like manner. There is a nice balance between his life and scientific work,nicely translated by Laura Fermi, widow of the famous Italian physicist Enrico Fermi of atomic reactor fame...I liked the short digressions to inform us of the times in which Galileo lived and struggled so much...The well-balanced view on the Inquisition which sentenced Galileo is nicely written...I have read five different books on Galileo---this is the best small-volume introduction to Galileo...essential reading for scientists and science teachers in high schools and colleges
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
but what do you expect with only just over a hundred pages...

I did get most of the basic information on his life and may delve further now that my curiosity has been peaked...

however, I was able to write the report I needed to for my Astonomy class and received an A on my paper!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 7 people found the following review helpful By George Shollenberger on December 25, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good book. Galileo's time at the University of Padua beginning in 1592 is critical information related to Nicholas of Cusa on indivisibles. In a footnote, Galiileo speaks of Cusa as the 'learned doctor.' Galileo says that Cusa spoke of imperceptible motions. Today, the imperceptible motion is called the 'principlre of least action.' This principle originates in the maximum-minimum principle of Cusa and was used in the geometry developed by Kepler on planetary force-free motions. From Cusa, Galileo learned that all God-made wholes have an infinite number of indivisible parts. Cusa, not Galileo, was thus the first modern scientist.

We can thus distinguish man-made wholes from God-made wholes. The man-made whole consist of a countable number of parts whereas the God-made whole has an uncountable number of parts. The man-made whole is often said to be 'the sum of its parts whereas the God-made whole is often said to be 'more than the sum of its parts.'

Based on the work of Cusa and Galileo, today's physical science can be challenged.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search