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Galileo Was Wrong: The Church Was Right Multimedia CD – September 1, 2007


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Galileo Was Wrong: The Church Was Right + Geocentrism 101: An Introduction into the Science of Geocentric Cosmology
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Product Details

  • CD-ROM: 1057 pages
  • Publisher: CAI Publishing Inc.; 2nd edition (September 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0977964000
  • ISBN-13: 978-0977964000
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 4.9 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #676,125 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robert A. Sungenis, Ph.D. is the president of Catholic Apologetics International and is the author of many books and articles on theology, science, culture and politics. Robert J. Bennett, Ph.D. has been an instructor of physics and mathematics for many years at various academic institutions.

Customer Reviews

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I think it may be that the Earth and Humanity were perceived as special and central in God's creation - but also fallen and corrupted.
R. Blinn
While this book is certainly rubbish, I find it fascinating that any modern scientist would stand with Gallileo and Copernicus, as what they proposed WAS incorrect.
Web Designer
All the book really does is ask the reader to pretend the Earth is stationary and that everything else moves pretty much the way science says it does.
M Windmill

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By MFAnalystPro on April 27, 2014
Format: CD-ROM
I never gave Geocentrism much thought until seeing this work by Robert Sungenis. This book was very interesting especially the quotes from famous scientists themselves that support this thesis. I would have gave it 5 stars but a lot of the scientific language is confusing. As usual Robert Sungenis does not disappoint. He is a Catholic Apologist to be reckoned with.
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Format: CD-ROM
But Gallileo and Coerpnicus were wrong - the stars DO NOT orbit the Sun.

While this book is certainly rubbish, I find it fascinating that any modern scientist would stand with Gallileo and Copernicus, as what they proposed WAS incorrect.

Tycho Brae - a towering historical astronomer - pointed out that the absence of measurable stellar parallax could only be explained by A) the earth not orbiting the sun, but vice versa or B) the stars would themselves have to be unfathomable distances away. And if (B) were true - that would mean the orbit of the stars around the sun would be covering such an immense distance that they would be totally destroyed. Which is in fact true - and as we know they would have to go millions of times the speed of light to make such a journey.

So what is stellar parallax? Take a look at two objects close together in your home, then move your head slightly to the left, and then slightly to the right. You will notice the relative positions of the objects have moved. Aristotle was the towering mind that pointed out "if the earth were orbiting the sun, at the two extremes of that orbit (6 months apart) we would observe a difference in the relative positions of the stars (the stellar parallax)... since no such difference is detectable, we must not be orbiting the sun".

What Aristotle did not know is what was suggested by Tycho Brae - the stars are unfathomable distances away - so far that telescopes powerful enough to measure the stellar parallax of even the closest of stars would not exist until the 19th century. To this day the stellar parallax is the most accurate way to measure the distance to other stars - and we can only do it accurately with very few.
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Format: CD-ROM
Galileo was not the "inventor" of the heliocentric theory, it's origins pre-date him and it wasn't even entirely accepted science until years later, mostly through the work of Tycho Brahe and Issac Newton. Of course scientifically ignorant people only know the name "Galileo" because that was mentioned on that one day in school when they weren't sleeping!

The easiest refutation to all this modern geocentrism nonsense is something that many of you might have in your car right now! It's called "GPS." If the Earth did not move and instead the entire universe simply obeyed a whole other set of fast-and-loose physical laws, then GPS would not work. Nor would satellite TV. Or cellular networks. All of those things rely on complex mathematics connected to general relativity that, if they were false, would be disastrous for the entire world on a daily basis. This book would essentially have you believe that the Bible is literally true, but that you have to go through some of the most insanely complicated logical loopholes and intellectual dishonesty in order to re-interpret reality which is, of course, par for the course with apologetic nonsense. That people buy into this in the 21st century is yet more evidence that we are headed for a new Dark Ages with religious nutbags who want to retreat into their bible-shaped hugbox because they are too scared of the real world. Your bronze age fairy tale created by illiterate desert nomads might not be the best thing to base a foundational view of the world on, just sayin. Oh, and for all the people saying you're "close minded" if you don't agree with this tripe: Yes, because nothing says "open minded" like voting down people's negative reviews en masse because you can't handle some criticism! Hypocrite, much?
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20 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Pedro on February 4, 2014
Format: CD-ROM
If you are reading the reviews for this book, you probably noticed how they are extremely polarized. There are lots of reviews with either one or five stars, and very few in between. This may lead you to think that the book is prone to radicalism and there's no middle ground, but here's the kicker: nobody who gave it one star actually read it. Nobody. Not even the preface. I never met anyone who harshly criticized this book without betraying the fact that they never read it. Everyone who wrote negative reviews here is assuming the book is about something else, presenting objections that are clearly answered in the book, or not directing any real criticism at all, just having a knee-jerk reaction and ranting.

You may agree or disagree with it at many points, as I myself do, but I doubt anyone can honestly say this isn't a good book.

The central thesis of Galileo Was Wrong: The Church Was Right is simple. We believe we live in a remote corner of a remote galaxy, of a remote group of galaxies in a really big universe, not because of scientific evidence, but because our history and cultural background leads us to prefer that view over others equally valid on scientific grounds, some even more valid. Sometimes we even twist our scientific theories to preserve that notion, trying to make some naturalistic sense out of the many anthropic coincidences present everywhere we look. Modern scientists somehow took men from the center of everything and put us into a meaningless universe not on the basis of scientific evidence, but on the ideological purpose of doing precisely that.
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