Gallipoli 1981 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

(225) IMDb 7.5/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

Mel Gibson delivers an electrifying performance in director Peter Weir's (The Truman Show, Witness) compelling story of friendship and adventure between two Australian soldiers in 1915.

Starring:
Mel Gibson, Mark Lee
Runtime:
1 hour 52 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Gallipoli

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Military & War, Drama, Adventure
Director Peter Weir
Starring Mel Gibson, Mark Lee
Supporting actors Harold Hopkins, Charles Lathalu Yunipingu, Heath Harris, Ron Graham, Gerda Nicolson, Mel Gibson, Robert Grubb, Tim McKenzie, David Argue, Brian Anderson, Reg Evans, Jack Giddy, Dane Peterson, Paul Linkson, Jenny Lovell, Steve Dodd, Harold Baigent, Robyn Galwey
Studio Paramount
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

A very good movie in it's own right, well worth watching.
American Goth
The story is well crafted and the cinematography along with the heart-wrenching soundtrack comes together in a near perfect film.
C. Middleton
The Anzacs fought a courages war against the Turks and the Turkish army defended their country well.
John Y.S.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

131 of 143 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Leach HALL OF FAME on October 10, 2004
Format: DVD
It's unfortunate in the extreme that the First World War has largely fallen by the wayside. If we hear anything about the conflict at all, it's usually on the History Channel or another network airing a documentary full of grainy, black and white clips of men stumbling over the top of trenches. Interest in historical events tends to drop off significantly when those involved pass away, and in the case of the generation that fought this horrific war not only have they exited the stage, they have left the building as well. I developed a life long interest in "the war to end all wars" after seeing Peter Weir's 1981 film "Gallipoli" in a small, run down art house theater at the age of ten. I didn't understand the historical context at the time, but this dramatic interpretation of events that unfolded in the Dardanelles during 1915 left a lasting impression on my impressionable mind. I recently rewatched the film and can say that it still works as an intense drama and as a serious antiwar statement. Weir's overt hostility toward the British commanders at Gallipoli, however, doesn't stand up as well. By the way, this is one of the films that propelled Mel Gibson to international stardom.

Weir decided to focus his film not on the massive armies battling away in Europe, but on two individuals living in Australia. Archy Hamilton (Mark Lee) and Frank Dunne (Mel Gibson) are two of the fastest runners in the country. Hamilton trains with his demanding grandfather, who promises the young lad that if he works hard he may yet go down as the next national sports hero. Frank, on the other hand, wanders around the country with a few buddies taking any job he can get and generally just having a lot of fun.
Read more ›
9 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
46 of 48 people found the following review helpful By tom strait on December 17, 1999
Format: DVD
There's been a few things said about this movie, several reviewers mentioned that it was slow-moving, and another pointed out with exasperating pedantry the historical inaccuracies, but I'd like to say that I think 'Gallipoli' is a good movie. It was well shot and well acted, the characters were real and believeable, the score was magnificient, the story was inspiring, and although the script had less action than, say, 'Saving Private Ryan' it also wasn't wasteful - one wouldn't have cared about the people if one didn't know them.
Which is also the point. If `Gallipoli' wasn't historically accurate, and it's tough to represent a yearlong epic in an hour and a half, one does get the point. Which, of course, is that wars, especially this one, and especially this battle, are stupid, self-serving and pointlessly destructive endeavors.
I'm dumbfounded by the reviewer who chose to lambaste the portrayal of the British officers in the campaign. I'm surprised an Aussie would say that, but then again there're plenty of Yanks who'll second guess Harry S Truman from now till the end of time, so who am I to judge. While I'm the first to admit that those words were probably not said, I have to believe that the blue blood of the capital officers taught them not to give a damn about the sweat and blood of some poor sons-of-criminals from a lost colony. I'm not alone, and I quote from John Merriman's History of Modern Europe, p1059, "Other [historians] agree with most contemporaries who believed that [Gallipoli] was a needless diversion dictated by British colonial interests in the Middle East and for which Australian and New Zealander troops paid a disproportionate price.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
40 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Alejandra Vernon HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 30, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
This is one of the best films I've ever seen. Mark Lee and Mel Gibson are magnificent and positively radiant in this tale of two friends caught up in a horrifying war...the innocence of these characters, and their courage, will move you to tears. Peter Weir has made many wonderful films (like "Witness") but none in my opinion as powerful as this. The score by Brian May is beautiful and uses Albinoni's glorious "Adagio in G minor" for the titles, credits, and during the film. If you were only to see 10 films in your entire life, this should be one of them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By R. Albin TOP 500 REVIEWER on January 4, 2004
Format: DVD
This excellent film is probably the best movie made by the talented Australian director Peter Weir. While Weir has a made a number of very good films, notably The Year of Living Dangerously and the recent Master and Commander, the subject matter of Gallipoli is the most serious of any of Weir's films. Gallipoli is the general title for the series of WWI battles in which the Western Allies attempted to force the Dardanelles and knock Turkey out of the war. Some, including Winston Churchill, himslef one of the prime movers behind the campaign, argued that Allied success at Gallipoli would have been decisive. This has been disputed by recent historians. The Gallipoli campaigns were the first large scale attempt at amphibious assault and were an organizational and tactical disaster. The Allied commanders flubbed several chances to beat the Turks. The Turkish defense was tenacious and much of the action became the trench warfare characteristic of much of WWI. The Allies failed, at great cost, though Turkish casulties were also quite high.
Gallipoli holds a special resonance for Australians. The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) was the first major overseas participation of Australian and New Zealand troops fighting as national formations. The ANZACs fought courageously, prefiguring the outstanding performance of Australian and New Zealand infantry in both World Wars. Gallipoli appears to occupy the place in Australian history that the Civil War occupies in American life. Australia (possibly also New Zealand) is the only country that regularly celebrates a major military defeat.
Weir's movie is a powerful depiction of the Australian experience at Gallipoli. The story is simple.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search