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Gallows Lane: An Inspector Devlin Mystery Hardcover – September 29, 2009


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Product Details

  • Series: An Inspector Devlin Mystery (Book 2)
  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Minotaur Books; First Edition edition (September 29, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312384327
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312384326
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 1.1 x 8.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #662,672 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Old guilt and new sins create a tangled puzzle in McGilloway's outstanding second Inspector Devlin mystery (after 2008's Borderlands). When Garda Insp. Benedict Devlin discovers the crucified body of James Kerr, an ex-con who claimed he'd returned home to forgive the gang members who betrayed him after a robbery, Devlin sets out to solve that slaying as well as the original robbery, which have links to drug thefts, brutal attempted rapes and additional murders. Devlin, who also has to cope with backstabbing fellow policemen and can't help getting personally involved in his cases, suffers from attacks of panic and conscience that push him to work harder, even when his wife and boss suggest he ease off. This quietly compelling procedural contains much buried passion, especially in the never acknowledged mutual attraction between Devlin and his female partner. Readers will be gripped as they watch this driven Irish detective seek his place in the moral landscape. (Sept.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Praise for Gallows Lane

"McGilloway is a major force in crime writing, and Inspector Ben Devlin is that rare creature: a detective who is not violent or tortured, but who is intensely, movingly human, and it is his humanity and decency that grip the reader and give these novels a searing honesty. The Devlin books are set to become one of the great series in modern crime fiction.” —John Connolly, author of The Unquiet

“This outstanding follow-up to McGilloway’s spectacular debut (Borderlands, 2008) confirms the Irish writer’s place on the A-list of European procedural authors….This fast-paced novel effectively portrays life along the border of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. The mystery element itself is satisfyingly complex, and McGilloway peoples the story with realistic and fully fleshed characters.” –Booklist (starred review)

“Old guilt and new sins create a tangled puzzle in McGilloway's outstanding second Inspector Devlin mystery. Readers will be gripped as they watch this driven Irish detective seek his place in the moral landscape.” –Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Refreshing in its outlook, this procedural showcases a rising star in full command of his craft. Strongly recommended, especially for readers of Ian Rankin's Inspector Rebus mysteries.” –Library Journal

“McGilloway has created a truly human and original police officer, flawed, maverick, and vulnerable, and a clever web of intrigue that deepens—and darkens—as it twists.” —Peter James, bestselling author of Dead Man’s Footsteps

“Devlin, best of fathers and least politic of coppers, is a helluva hero elbowing his way through a gritty plot.” –Kirkus Reviews

“Brian McGilloway's Borderlands was one of last year's most impressive debuts. Does Gallows Lane pass the feared 'second novel' test? Easily.” –The Times (UK)

“McGilloway, with his lovingly rendered landscapes and all-to-fallible detective, continues to investigate invisible demarcations of power, ancient lines of conflict and the shadowlands of the human psyche.” –Guardian (UK)

“McGilloway's second Devlin mystery gathers pace and tension. Planted evidence, death threats and a bruising rivalry for promotion bring on panic attacks in Devlin as he struggles to bring his flawed police work to a just conclusion.” –Financial Times (UK)

More About the Author

Brian McGilloway is the New York Times bestselling author of the critically acclaimed Inspector Benedict Devlin and DS Lucy Black series. He was born in Derry, Northern Ireland in 1974. After studying English at Queen's University, Belfast, he took up a teaching position in St Columb's College in Derry, where he was Head of English.

His first novel, Borderlands, published by Macmillan New Writing, was shortlisted for the CWA New Blood Dagger 2007 and was hailed by The Times as 'one of (2007's) most impressive debuts.' The second novel in the series, Gallows Lane, was shortlisted for both the 2009 Irish Book Awards/Ireland AM Crime Novel of the Year and the Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year 2010. Bleed A River Deep, the third Devlin novel, was selected by Publishers Weekly as one of their Best Books of 2010.

Brian's fifth novel, Little Girl Lost, which introduced a new series featuring DS Lucy Black, won the University of Ulster's McCrea Literary Award in 2011 and was a New York Times Bestseller in the US and a No.1 Bestseller in the UK. The follow-up novel, Hurt, was published in late 2013 by Constable and Robinson and will be published in the USA in May 2014. The third Lucy Black novel will follow later in 2014.

In 2014, Brian won BBC NI's Tony Doyle Award for his screenplay, Little Emperors, an award which sees him become Writer In Residence with BBC NI.

Brian lives near the Irish borderlands with his wife, daughter and three sons.

Customer Reviews

These are keepers as they are well worth reading again.
Mary V. Welter
Love Inspector Devlin, I learned a great deal about Irenland it police force, and there was not of extra words to cloud the story.
SewSewDesign
This Author has a way of bringing his characters to life, and effortlessly inserting them into the reader's life.
Joyce Islas

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Gloria Feit VINE VOICE on January 1, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This novel is the second in a new series featuring Benedict ["Ben"] Devlin, an Inspector in the Guards, or An Garda, in Lifford, Donegal, Ireland. [The title derives from the name of the street along which, centuries ago, the condemned were led en route to their death.] As the book opens, Devlin meets with a man from the North country, James Kerr, just released after 8 years of incarceration, his mandate being to make sure Kerr crosses back over the border to his home territory, thereby ensuring no further criminal activity by him on Devlin's patch. But Kerr, it seems, has lately found God, and first needs to complete a 'mission' in keeping with that spiritual awakening.

A more challenging job soon awaits Devlin, as the body of a young girl is discovered, savagely beaten to death. When that murder is followed by the severe beating of another girl, this one only sixteen years old, the investigation intensifies. The only problem is that no one can come up with anything more than a vague description of the man responsible.

Complicating things somewhat is the fact that Devlin's boss, Supt. Olly ["Elvis"] Costello, is about to retire, and there is an impending promotion within the ranks. Devlin is urged to put his name up as an applicant, causing some political infighting among his colleagues.

Devlin is a man of principle, something that creates problems for him, as he soon has reason to question whether that same standard, and his "need to prove himself right, regardless of the cost," will bring lethal harm to him or his loved ones. He is a happily married man [when his devotion to his job and those aforementioned principles are not causing marital strife] with an infant son, a seven-year-old daughter, and a one-eared basset hound named Frank.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Harriet Klausner #1 HALL OF FAME on October 3, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Superintendent Costello directs Garda Detective Inspector Benedict Devlin to warn convict James Kerr as he leaves Maghaberry Prison to not settle in Lifford. Kerr refuses to speak with Devlin insisting he only is coming to town to forgive his former partner Peter Webb, who with others betrayed him during the Castlederg robbery that sent James to prison.

Soon afterward, someone kills Webb whose wife was with her lover Decko O'Kane at the time of the homicide. Kerr was allegedly seen nearby, but Devlin thinks the case is too obvious. He is proven right when Kerri is crucified followed by the murder of Decko. Devlin believes the robbery is the link between the deaths; if he can solve that he can solve the serial killing of those who were involved. The DI has other cases to work too that prove pressure laden to resolve.

Inspector Devlin in his second whodunit (see BORDERLANDS) makes this Irish police procedural so good even when he struggles with anxiety and panic attacks while his spouse and his long time partner Carline Williams beg him to back away from this case that is mentally crippling him. However, the DI cannot; instead he feels compelled to work even harder at this and other cases. Readers will feel root for the hero as he tries to keep his ethical compass steady in spite of the trouble he faces doing it.

Harriet Klausner
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By jjflash15 on September 11, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Although Gallows Lane was an interesting story, I didn't feel it was nearly as well told as Borderlands or the two Lucy Black novels I've read. It gave Inspector Devlin significantly more psychological problems without much reason why. It also made his pursuit of the top job rather half hearted for no apparent reason, particularly since a guy he despised was almost sure to get it if he didn't. All in all, a less satisfying book vs Brian's other efforts I've read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Craobh Rua on May 24, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Brian McGilloway was born in Derry in 1974. He studied English at Queens University Belfast, and is now Head of English at St. Columb's College, Derry.(St Columb's has two Nobel Laureate's amongst its alumni - John Hume and Seamus Heaney). Borderlands was his debut novel and was first published in 2007. It was shortlisted for that year's CWA New Blood Dagger Award.

"Gallows Lane" is the second book to feature Benedict Devlin, an Inspector with An Garda Siochana. He's based in his hometown of Lifford in County Donegal, which is located right on the border with Northern Ireland. Although only a few minutes away on foot, the neighbouring town of Strabane is on the other side of the border - where the laws are enforced by the PSNI. Crime being what it is, though, sometimes the two police forces have to work together - Jim Hendry, an Inspector with PSNI, proves a very useful contact.

A few years have now passed since the events of "Borderlands", though the events of that book have finally taken their toll on Costello, Ben's boss. At the book's beginning, he announces his retirement and encourages Ben to go for promotion - though Ben himself isn't too sure he wants it. Another Inspector based in Lifford, Harry Patterson, is a different matter entirely. Despite applying more than once, Patterson was never accepted into the detective branch; as a result, things had been difficult between when Ben was first appointed to the station. Patterson is very keen to make it to Superintendent; the fact that he's recently found his second drugs and arms cache in two months will only work in his favour. The stash had been found on Gallows Lane, on property belonging to an Englishman called Peter Webb.
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