Customer Reviews


29 Reviews
5 star:
 (18)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (4)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating
Great, practical advice on how to reach consumers when and where they are receptive to a brand message -- while implementing unique-but-proven media techniques.

Todd Sebastian
Best-selling author, Tell Your Clients Where to Go! A Practical Guide to Providing Passionate Client Leadership
Published on March 29, 2010 by Todd Sebastian

versus
35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Good concept, poorly executed
I am totally on board with the authors' main concept, which is why it was so frustrating to try and read this book.

From start to finish it is poorly written and edited, overly verbose when it could be much clearer and to the point, and nauseatingly vague on important details. For example, it dives into frequent flyer programs without clearly saying what they...
Published on December 4, 2010 by Amazon Customer


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Good concept, poorly executed, December 4, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Game-Based Marketing: Inspire Customer Loyalty Through Rewards, Challenges, and Contests (Hardcover)
I am totally on board with the authors' main concept, which is why it was so frustrating to try and read this book.

From start to finish it is poorly written and edited, overly verbose when it could be much clearer and to the point, and nauseatingly vague on important details. For example, it dives into frequent flyer programs without clearly saying what they are, presents grandiose visions of how Facebook could be improved by a leaderboard, and seems to think Starbucks branches have a VIP lane. Plus it keeps using the awful term "Funware" to describe all this.

Throughout, tantalising references are made to interesting concepts or events -- the Microsoft commercial, Flyertalk, Nike+ -- and either assume outright the reader is familiar with these, or provide little followup information for the reader to find out more. Even the section on Richard Bartle, the deity of player characterisation, was poor - lifted straight from Bartle's work with little original material about how this might apply to today's consumers.

If you have any familiarity with games or reward mechanics, you will find this book as disappointing as I did. I wanted to like it, and I want books like this to spread the message that games and fun are a key part of customer engagement. But this book failed to deliver, and needs a serious edit before the 2nd edition. Read an article on gamification instead, and you will come away with all its key points without having wasted your time and money trying to read this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Repetitive, Elementary, November 30, 2010
This review is from: Game-Based Marketing: Inspire Customer Loyalty Through Rewards, Challenges, and Contests (Hardcover)
Good concept, really poorly written. The author wastes our time by trying to associate his own trademarked "Funware" name with anything resembling gaming mechanics past and present (including incentive programs that were used before he was even born, such as the Boy Scouts, Mary Kay and S&H Green Stamps).

Overly repetitive use of Frequent Flyer Programs, and very little useful information on using game-based marketing in a non-game entity. I really thought it would show how e-commerce, media, or product companies could deploy game mechanics to create a better user experience.

Gaming Mechanics and Game Dynamics are important to understand, unfortunately, this book doesn't help one bit.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Saying in a Book What Could be Said in an Article, July 27, 2010
By 
Susan Diamond (Wheeling, IL United States) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Game-Based Marketing: Inspire Customer Loyalty Through Rewards, Challenges, and Contests (Hardcover)
I was all gung-ho to learn about game-based marketing. It's a deceiving title. This repetitive book kept talking about frequent flyer programs and fictional campaigns advertisers coulda-shoulda done. Technically, is this game-based marketing? Yes. But it's not relevant to what's really going on with games and apps like Farmville and Mafia Wars.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Just the basics, September 10, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Game-Based Marketing: Inspire Customer Loyalty Through Rewards, Challenges, and Contests (Hardcover)
I agree with Susan Diamond and 'The big shmoo' in that this book just touches the basics and is quite repetitive in using Frequent Flyer Programs as the perfect example of game-based marketing. I'm now reading 'The Art of Game Design: A book of lenses' by Jesse Schell and although it's a much tougher note to crack it is waaaay better in giving you inspiration in using games for marketing or communities.

If you decide to do anything with games you need a more in depth book anyway, so you might as well skip this book because the contents will be covered in the first chapter of every book about games.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Overly Repetitive, No Much Substance!, February 20, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
You will read Frequent Flyer programs, McDonald's Monopoly, etc. across different chapters. It seems there were no coordination between these two authors. The whole book reads like a patchwork stitched with pieces and repeated pieces! It would be much better if they can focus on a concept and a few illustrating cases in each chapter. A waste of money.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Useless collection of links and some frequent flyer examples, August 21, 2011
By 
Andreas West (currently Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Game-Based Marketing: Inspire Customer Loyalty Through Rewards, Challenges, and Contests (Hardcover)
I've bought this book from the self announced "Expert of Gamification" Gabe Zicherman to learn more about Gamification and how other companies applied gaming mechanics successfully. Boy, was I disappointed when I read the book (and I read it until the final pages patiently waiting for something positive). So why was I so disappointed you might ask?

- 16% of the books pages are a collection of articles which are used as reference and the rest is an index of words used (nice way of filling up your book with space in case you don't have anything to say!)
- a further 7% is filled up by Cover, Table of Content, Foreword and Acknowledgement - that makes it 23% of useless pages that I paid for!
- the author is quite well in repeating the same over and over again. He's basically stretching his main messages which can be summarized in a normal 16 page pdf article over the full book
- most interesting chapter is about the history of the frequent flyer program, that is for me, a person not born in the US ;-)
- a full chapter is spent on Bartle's Player Types, interesting if you're new to the concept but 100% taken from Bartle, so you learn nothing knew if you heard that before
- he's only referring to a couple of example and then points out mostly ones that failed - would be nice to hear also about positive examples of Gamification
- nothing is being said about how to combine game mechanics to engage the customer for a longer period of time, no wonder Gamification is being seen as a buzz word and everybody thinks it's only badges and some frequent flyer program
- the few examples he gives aren't going really deep, they aren't coming from working with these companies but rather from research what is available on the internet about it. If he did indeed work there, then he seems to be bound to only talk superficial bla bla about the work he did with them

All in all like I already said one of the few books where I'm really disappointed that I bought them. Especially so as I started to read the first few pages online here at Amazon, but I thought he it's going to get deeper and more interesting later on. I should have trusted my own feelings based on those pages that are available online. If you like them, buy the book, if they don't deliver a real interest for you to read further on, stay away from buying it, you won't regret it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars not worth the read, April 29, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Game-Based Marketing: Inspire Customer Loyalty Through Rewards, Challenges, and Contests (Hardcover)
This book covers mainly on-line gaming promotions and had little relevant information for retail businesses, which was what I wanted it for. The title was misleading in my opinion. Unless you want to create an elaborate on-line contest, it isn't helpful.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, But Not Great, July 8, 2010
By 
The Big Shmoo (Where does a shmoo come from?) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Game-Based Marketing: Inspire Customer Loyalty Through Rewards, Challenges, and Contests (Hardcover)
Although Gabe Zichermann and Joselin Linder have a very well written and polished book, I can't say that they have fully convinced me of there thesis. Game Based Marketing definitely has its place, but I would hate to think the Frequent Flier Miles programs are an ideal embodiment. The book talks about the low redemption rate of flier miles and how this is a huge plus for the program. Maybe I am naive, but, isn't one of the reasons for low redemption, very simple. People who travel as part of their job, might not be as inclined to travel on their days off? (Think about it.) If 80% of airline miles accumulation comes from the 20% who fly as part of their job, that explain the low redemption rate.

I think that Gabe and Joselin lost focus on the most important thing, the customer. A customer, in any marketing program wants to feel valued and appreciated. More importantly the customer wants to feel like they are getting fair value for their time and money. Most of us DO NOT thrive on trying to accumulate points on a leader board. We DO thrive on trying to get something for nothing, or stretch our dollar as fast as possible.

One of the fundamental reasons that a form of game based marketing, such as MacDonald's Monopoly promotion, has any success, is the notion that by participating, the player can have a life changing event. The player is led to believe that by collecting game pieces, the player can have a shot a $1 million dollars. It is the same reason a player puts in $1.00 into a progressive slot machine. It is for the thrill of getting a life changing moment. The author's clearly missed this.

Games can be fun. Games can be a great way to promote a program. But DO NOT take your loyal customer base, such as a frequent flier program, and turn it into something where you stop rewarding them for good customer behavior. We live in cost cutting times. We are in a recession. If you want to inspire customer loyalty here is the tried and true method to achieve it:

a) Listen to your customers
b) Go amongst your customers. Send somebody high in the food chain to talk to them
c) Appreciate your customers -- say thank you. Call them, and say thank you. At random, have the CEO write them a hand written thank you note!
d) Offer them fair value for their money
e) Offer an outstanding product that your customers will evangelize to other customers
f) Be better than average. Be better than good. Be exceptional in whatever you do.
g) Reward your customers in ways that benefit them. If a customer makes a lot of purchases, reward this behavior by giving them discounts, special sales, access to premiums, extended store hours, etc. Do anything possible to make your customer desire to purchase more.

Unfortunately, none of the items I listed above are a game. More importantly, I have a long list of companies who did not follow that list who are now either second tier in their industry, or out of business. The only game here is that one these so-called experts would like to play on a company's most valuable resource: Its loyal repeat customers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, March 29, 2010
By 
This review is from: Game-Based Marketing: Inspire Customer Loyalty Through Rewards, Challenges, and Contests (Hardcover)
Great, practical advice on how to reach consumers when and where they are receptive to a brand message -- while implementing unique-but-proven media techniques.

Todd Sebastian
Best-selling author, Tell Your Clients Where to Go! A Practical Guide to Providing Passionate Client Leadership
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fresh new perspective on games in business, April 20, 2010
By 
D. Defranco (San Francisco, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Game-Based Marketing: Inspire Customer Loyalty Through Rewards, Challenges, and Contests (Hardcover)
I'm a strategist for a boutique strategic-marketing firm in Silicon Valley and have been quite interested for some time in how to leverage fun in all aspects of a company's communication lifecycle. While games in business have been around for a long time, the authors have done an excellent job of distilling the complex ideas of "Funware" into an actionable set of strategies and tactics. The subject matter is pretty dense, but the book is shockingly easy to read and understand. The lightbulbs were going off above me during my whole read, and I just couldn't put the book down. All in all, a great, inspirational work.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Game-Based Marketing: Inspire Customer Loyalty Through Rewards, Challenges, and Contests
$24.95 $17.82
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.