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3D Game Engine Architecture: Engineering Real-Time Applications with Wild Magic (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Interactive 3d Technology) Hardcover – December 17, 2004


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Product Details

  • Series: The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Interactive 3d Technology
  • Hardcover: 752 pages
  • Publisher: CRC Press; Har/Cdr edition (December 17, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 012229064X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0122290640
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 7.7 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #937,488 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Readers of Eberly's previous books, 3D Game Engine Design and Geometric Tools for Computer Graphics, asked for a volume with more code samples and fewer equations. This book will please and aid them greatly.. That key points are sometimes underscored with a dry wit is characteristic of how a great teacher makes studying a difficult topic personally rewarding for the student." -Joseph Goldstone, Lilliputian Pictures

"Credo Interactive has been using the WildMagic API for the past 3 years in various commercial projects. 3D Game Engine Architecture provides an excellent source of theoretical background and practical usage information for the API. Together the textbook and the WildMagic sourcecode form a comprehensive and well designed foundation for any 3D application." -Lars Wilke, Director of Development, Credo Interactive Inc.

"For those that have searched for a commercial quality rendering library available at virtually no cost and with extensive clear documentation. Let them look no further. From low level structures, to high level application design, Eberly has laid out everything necessary for commercial quality game development. May the projects inspired by his writings be plentiful and prosperous." -Timothy Prepscius, DimensionDoor, Inc.

Book Description

The eagerly awaited companion to the bestselling 3D Game Engine Design- the book that set a standard for the industry

More About the Author

You can read the dry details about who I am on the back cover of any of my books. After a 3-year stay at a company in Redmond WA, I am back to running Geometric Tools and writing books. The latest is "GPGPU Programming for Games and Science", scheduled for publication in August 2014. The Wild Magic 5 source code base is about to be retired, and this next book introduces a new code base (DirectX 11.x, currently implementing OpenGL 4.x with compute shaders).

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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So yes, still read this book.
A. M. Hernandez
Dave's writing style is clear and minimally conversational, and he's kept the math to a minimum, making this a remarkably easy read.
Dave Astle
The title says everything, this book treats most aspects concerning game engine design architecture and programming.
Rodrigo P. Martins

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Dave Astle VINE VOICE on April 17, 2005
Format: Hardcover
One of the criticisms I had of Dave Eberly's previous 3D Game Engine Design is that it didn't really say much about how to design an engine. Rather, it focused mostly on the programming/implementation details, which was disappointing to some. This new book is what many people expected from the older book.

In this book, the author walks through the design and architecture of a 3D game engine, using his Wild Magic engine as an example, but also drawing on his experience developing NDL's NetImmerse. Throughout, he describes why each design decision was made, and in many cases alternative solutions are discussed as well. This isn't just a high level discussion, however, as ample source code, figures, equations, and sample applications are included to get you started with implementation.

The topics covered include the core engine systems, scene graphs, renderers, cameras, LOD, animation, terrain, special effects, physics and collision detection. Numerous sample applications and tools are also included. Dave's writing style is clear and minimally conversational, and he's kept the math to a minimum, making this a remarkably easy read.

This isn't a complete treatment of a game engine, since some important topics (e.g. scripting, audio) aren't included, but the material it does cover is worth it. Whether you're currently working on a game engine, planning to start one, or just want to have a better understanding of how they work, you'll be happy with this book.
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34 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Michael C. Sikora on November 8, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is an acceptable introductory book for the architecture of an AAA-quality game engine, under the consideration that it has so little competition.

The most significant criticism I have of the book is its repeated digression of topics into a documentation of the Wild Magic engine. If you intend to use the Wild Magic engine, I highly recommend the book, but for anyone not using it, this book saves far too few pages for discussions of general engine architecture.

For example, the entire second chapter is basically a documentation of the basic types defined for the Wild Magic engine. If you are architecting a large scale project, you do not want to start the discussion with talk of a smart pointer class. Or an array class. Unfortunately, this is exactly how the book begins.

Throughout the book, the reader is constantly forced to shift through documentation for each Wild Magic class. While the author does use the engine to illustrate points, often the point is so heavily mixed with the documentation that it is tedious to pick out the general discussion.

My secondary criticism of the book is that too many words are used in specific (but uncommon) ways - making it hard to follow at times. The sad part is that the author acknowledges this for some words (which helps the reader) but fails to for others. An example of the latter is when the author concedes that he uses the word `animation' to mean any event that happens over a period of time. You will not find that definition in any dictionary, but at least he specifies his intent, which is slightly forgivable. What is not forgivable is the other phrases/words that are not acknowledged as being uncommonly used, such as `world bounds' and `local bounds'.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By B. Freidlin on January 23, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Few books on the topic of 3D and game engines are as thorough as Eberly's latest. He walks you through a top shelf commercial quality engine (minus some bells and whistles) and gives strong details and motivations behind the entire codebase's design choices.

Not only is it well written, its generous of him to continue to make this quality code so cheaply available to readers. A job well done, I urge all fellow hobbyists and professionals to support his work.
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19 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Randall Helzerman on April 26, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I don't know if this book the best documentation of a software architecture ever written, but its gotta rate up there. Probably its only rivals would be some of the foundational papers about the design of UNIX.

Why are there so few good contenders? Well, the genre of documentation for software architecture is a demanding one, because you need to master of so many skills in order to do it right. What makes it even harder is that the codebase is always changing in response to bugfixes and enhancements, which puts the documentation in continual jeopardy of drifting away from the codebase it describes.

Yes, this volume is a bit more plodding than Eberly's usual effortless writing style, but remember, he's documenting a software architecture, which is an inherently plodding task. Its ploddinghood is therefore a feature, not a bug. Moreover, he is never gratuitously plodding.

f you want to be a great documentor of software architectures, then pay close attention to the techniques Eberly uses here. Notice how, by casting the documentation in a tutorial form, he simultaniously makes it (1) a much more interesting read, and (2) makes it a dual-use document, invaluable both to newbies getting up to speed and to old pro's wanting to refresh their memory.

Budding game engine developers will find this book invaluable, but they are not the only ones who would benefit from reading it. This book could be profitably used in a general software architecture class, as an example of how to really document a software architecture.

In addition, a game engine's architecture is a superset of many other software architectures. For example, someone who is building a large-scale CAD system, or an EDA package, or an event-driven simulation package, or a physics simulation package, would also save themselves from many unanticipated "gotchas" by giving this book a close read.
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