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Game Over: How Nintendo Conquered The World Paperback – March 29, 1994

4.7 out of 5 stars 39 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 451 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage (March 29, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679736220
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679736226
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.2 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,640,826 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I was caught up in the Pokemon craze for a while and when I came across this book about Nintendo, the game company that distributed the game, I just had to read it. I was not to regret it.
The author had an easy style, one that merged dry facts with a fair amount of story telling. He also managed to throw in suspense at regular intervals, just like a novel. But that is what makes this book, in my opinion, an excellent one. There are serious lessons in business to be learned from this book, yet the author managed to tell it in a easily digestible style. Perhaps, it has got to do with his extensive experience in writing articles for magazines.
While it detailed the history of Nintendo and how it rose from a humble card-making operation to the dominant player in the world of video-games, I was more impressed with the management lessons that could be learned from the marketing genius of the company. Yamauchi, the person behind Nintendo, was clearly an astute businessman in his own right. While not as famous as the late Morita, he clearly has a place among the very best of Japanese businessmen in the 1980s.
The book also revealed the legal and social environment of the 1980s and early 1990s. In a country like America where litigation can be considered a profit centre of a large corporation, Nintendo was faced with several legal suits that could potentially cost it millions of dollars, including the possibility of bankruptcy. Coupled with the fact that America at that time was also faced with one of the largest trade deficits with Japan and Japan-bashing was the call of the day, how Nintendo managed to survive those years was another interesting sub-plot in the book.
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Format: Paperback
...I'd be worth almost as much as M. Arakawa. This book has been referenced many, many times in various articles. If some reporter needs a "secret" fact about Nintendo, they'll turn to this book. "Did you know the president of Nintendo of America has a tendency to fall asleep?" and so on. Of course, this book is worthy of all that referencing, as it is one interesting tale of a pretty interesting, if not secretive, company. If you're interested in knowing a little more about what *really* was the cause of some of the biggest video games in history, this is one source of knowledge. The best part about the book is, if you're a fan of Nintendo (or video games in general) , this book will grab your attention and not let go. For as much of the book is spent on Tetris, it's all that more interesting. Hearing about secret meetings in Communist-run facilities, with these guys from little video game companies running back and forth and deceiving these Russians who don't know what kind of hit they have on their hands... it's James Bond-level stuff! A great read!
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Format: Paperback
This book is absolutely fabulous. David Sheff succeeds in giving a vivid history of one of the greatest game companies. It captivates the reader with it's suspense. I especially liked the stories on how Nintendo won various lawsuits, how the different games were developed, how they got their names(especially Mario)and the company's struggle with negative press publicity. Brings out clearly American's obsession with video games and their original apathy towards the same. Hiroshi Yamauchi, Minoru Arakawa and the other founders are not only profiled in their professional capacities but also the struggles in their personal lives are well brought out. The author's quickness to point out when Nintendo was wrong and his sense of humour are uplifting. The book is an absolute must have for anyone interested in the world of business.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Insanely addictive read, was hard to put down. From engineering ingenuity to financial takeovers to international politics with Bush and Gorbachev, this story has it all. What a history of not only Nintendo's ascension but the videogame industry from its infancy. Of how Atari employed a young Steve Jobs to help reduce number of chips used in games and how the creator of Tetris was rewarded for his ingenuity with a pc and a game boy (the only one in USSR). Can't recommend enough.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This title is a nice overview on the business side of how Nintendo went from a simple toy company to one of the video game giants in the world. Although I was looking for something that explored the background of the designers of these iconic games (which is briefly explored), the story of how NOA was built, the law suits and the marketing strategies were interesting dramas that would probably make a great TV show some day. If you've ever wondered how one of your favorite childhood past times continued to be one of your current favorite past times, check out this read. If you're interested business strategy, also take a look. If you're one of those people who think video games are for kids, or too violent, then quit reading this review on your handheld device/ smart phone.....and read this book anyway.
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Format: Paperback
I picked this one up in the bargain bin of a local bookstore recently, and figured that it would be an interesting look at the company behind so many hours of my entertainment when I was a kid.
I was surprised to find a very interesting, well written, and in-depth book talking about all the major players in the industry, from the executives of Nintendo to the game designers at the individual software houses.
This book is a great deal of fun and you always want to see what's going happen next. Sheff makes it so dramatic that you wonder whether he's making it all up because its almost too good to be true.
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