Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.95
  • Save: $4.20 (22%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 19 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Game Over: How Politics H... has been added to your Cart
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by CWJBOOKS
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Exlibrary softcover book in good condition, that may contain usual library markings & stickers. This book has some general reader wear.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Game Over: How Politics Has Turned the Sports World Upside Down Paperback – January 29, 2013

3.9 out of 5 stars 31 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.75
$7.12 $4.99

Featured Titles in Sports & Outdoors
This Is Your Brain on Sports: The Science of Underdogs, the Value of Rivalry, and What We Can Learn from the T-Shirt Cannon
This Is Your Brain on Sports: The Science of Underdogs, the Value of Rivalry, and What We Can Learn from the T-Shirt Cannon
This Is Your Brain on Sports: The Science of Underdogs, the Value of Rivalry, and What We Can Learn from the T-Shirt Cannon
$14.75 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 19 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Game Over: How Politics Has Turned the Sports World Upside Down
  • +
  • People's History of Sports in the United States: 250 Years of Politics, Protest, People, and Play (New Press People's History)
Total price: $29.43
Buy the selected items together

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Short of wearing out the subject of politics in sports (Bad Sports, 2010, and A People’s History of Sports in the United States, 2008), sports analyst Zirin focuses here on the pushback by athletes and fans around the globe against injustices they see, whether in sports alone or on the larger political stage. For example, the NBA’s Phoenix Suns changed their name to Los Suns for their 2010 Cinco de Mayo game versus the San Antonio Spurs to express their solidarity with Arizona’s Hispanics over the state’s tough anti-immigration laws. The NFL Players Association stood against Wisconsin governor Scott Walker’s efforts to strip collective bargaining rights from public workers there. And there was worldwide support of South African runner Caster Semenya, who won silver in the women’s 800-meter event at the 2012 London Games, over questions regarding the legitimacy of her stated gender. Other subjects include the Penn State scandal, the public reaction to Linsanity, and the continued objectification of women in sports. Readers who have responded to Zirin’s other highly engaging books will find more of the same here. --Alan Moores

Review

“A damning indictment of all that is corrupting sports and a song of praise for athletes standing up for human rights and decency.”
Kirkus

“In his enlightening essay collection, Nation columnist and author Zirin (Welcome to the Terrordome) employs common sense and research to show that politics and sports are entangled, whether it’s members of the Green Bay Packers supporting the collective bargaining rights of Wisconsin’s public workers or the Phoenix Suns donning ‘Los Suns’ uniforms to protest Arizona’s controversial, immigrant-obsessed law, SB 1070. . . . Zirin steadfastly demonstrates how the games we watch are not just an escape from the everyday: they are a reflection that provides a perfect opportunity for protest and change.”
Publishers Weekly
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: The New Press (January 29, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595588159
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595588159
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #300,784 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Dave Zirin was named one of the "50 Visionaries Who Are Changing Our World" by Utne Magazine. He writes about the politics of sports for the Nation magazine, and is their first sports writer in 150 years of existence. Zirin is also the host of Sirius XM satellite's popular weekly show, "Edge of Sports Radio," as well as a columnist for SLAM Magazine, the Progressive, and a regular op-ed writer for the Los Angeles Times. Zirin's previous books are What's My Name, Fool? Sports and Resistance in the United States; Welcome to the Terrordome: The Pain, Politics, and Promise of Sports; The Muhammad Ali Handbook; and A People's History of Sports in the United States.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Zirin's newest volume returns to his favorite topics: race, gender, unions, the corporatization and corruption of sports, and athletes willing to speak out on any of the above. What makes his work important, even indispensable, is his selection and emphasis. Simply by raising the issues he does, Zirin makes a unique contribution to our understanding of American popular culture.

"Game Over" is mostly a snapshot of sports and society from 2010 to 2012. The Occupy movement looms large, as does the Arab Spring, World Cup, Jeremy Lin mania, and Penn State child rape scandal. All are grist for Zirin's mill, but they also reveal the beauty of his formula. American athletics, at least in its current institutional forms, can be counted on to produce a steady stream of fresh outrage.

One can quibble with Zirin's analysis, but what other American journalist is writing about the revolutionary role of Egyptian soccer hooligans? Who else is remotely interested in the hidden costs of the Olympics and World Cup, especially for workers and activists in host countries? Whether or not you accept his arguments, Zirin consistently calls our attention to the social context and significance of sports, and "Game Over" keeps that streak alive.
Comment 15 of 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Dave Zirin does certainly not have writer's block. He has been churning out books virtually every year since 2005 when he published "What's My Name, Fool? Sports and Resistance in the United States." He gives voice to my frustrations with his leftist take on sports, politics, and society in modern America. Zirin is at his best, as in the case with this book, when he does not try to write history but instead comments on current issues. Too often, unfortunately, Zirin's historical work is a bit less sophisticated than I would like. That is not the case with this book. He focuses in "Game Over" on a series of recent events in the incursion of politics into sports, mostly in the U.S. but also with some discussion of events elsewhere.

The book opens with a narrative of how NFL and NBA owners both sought at essentially the same time a massive transfer of the proceeds of these games from players to the owners. This is greed run amok, not unlike the greed that led to the global meltdown in 2007-2008. The NFL owners locked out the players, but the players' association was able to draw connections to the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations and helped themselves get past the general meme that billionaires and millionaires were duking it out over who got more of the lucrative NFL pie. The players especially tied themselves to the thousands of service industry workers who made they livings at the stadiums, bars, restaurants, and other work associated with game day. By emphasizing that the players were working stiffs, albeit well-paid ones for very short average careers, as opposed to those who own the teams and suck local communities dry in stadium deals and exploit workers across the board, the players gained the upper hand in negotiations.
Read more ›
Comment 5 of 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The lesson I learned from this read is that a good book can be ruined by too much soap-box. Game Over by Dave Zirin is mostly a well-written, engaging book. It looks at the sports-world, both in America and abroad, and it’s relationship with politics. These are connections that need to be better recognized and Zirin does a good job of drawing the lines to make the connections.

The first chapter begins with the Green Bay Packers – so of course, how could I not love that – and the connections between the Packers, the NFL Lockout, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker and the Occupy Movement. Other chapters cover soccer and the Arab Spring, the Olympics and a global movement towards police states, and the NCAA and labor.

The most powerful chapter is the one on Joe Paterno and the sports world’s willingness to turn its eyes from very terrible wrongs. As Zirin points out, “this is what happens when a football program becomes the economic, social, and spiritual heartbeat of an entire region.” I have no doubt that had this book been written a few months later, that chapter would have included conversation about Stubenville as well.

The chapter on “Sexuality and Sports” highlights far more than just your average “woman aren’t treated equally” view. Zirin gets into everything from the ultra-sexualization of some women athletes to the full gender spectrum that includes more than those on the outer edges of masculine and feminine. If you were to pick up this book and only read 2 chapters, I’d definitely suggest this one and the one on Paterno.

As I said, Game Over is mostly well-written. It’s sprinkled throughout with a little too much of Zirin’s own politics. These things can be glossed over for the most part, until you get to the last chapter.
Read more ›
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
Some of these essays on the merging of sports and politics in the current age are terrific. Others are so far off base they're laughable.

Of the good Zirin's take on the soccer ultras (hooligans) of Egypt being involved in the Arab Spring is both accurate reporting and something the lamestream media completely missed. I also enjoyed his look at the Sandusky scandal at Penn State.

Where he totally lost me was on commenting about the World Cup Finals and Olympics. Sure the money could be better spent elsewhere, and both FIFA and the IOC are corrupt as anything but he got Vancouver 2010 completely wrong. Quoting a single Customs officer complaining about $5,000 hockey tickets is just hearsay. As someone who got all sorts of men's hockey tickets in the lottery (including both semi-finals) as well as through the official Games site at cost during the Olympics (for even a quarter-final) it was very easy to get tickets for games NOT involving Canada. Even so we saw Canada play three times through those tix we scored through the lottery system. You just need to get EVERYONE you know to apply as that's something we learned back in the time of soccer's 1994 USA World Cup Finals. We even managed after the Games started to get tickets to speed skating, short track speed skating and curling all at cost through the official site.

He also fails to mention that under California state law, no public money can be used to build any pro sports stadiums, ballparks or arenas. When he devotes a huge chunk of the book to the ridiculous public spending on these sports playgrounds, he forgets to mention that at all when referring to the situation he focuses on in that particular state.
Read more ›
Comment 3 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Game Over: How Politics Has Turned the Sports World Upside Down
This item: Game Over: How Politics Has Turned the Sports World Upside Down
Price: $14.75
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: games sociology