Trade in your item
Get a $1.39
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Game Over Press Start To Continue Paperback – April 15, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0966961706 ISBN-10: 0966961706

26 Used from $8.98
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$8.98

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 494 pages
  • Publisher: Cyberactive Media Group Inc/Game Pr (April 15, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0966961706
  • ISBN-13: 978-0966961706
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5.1 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #286,932 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Irresistable...almost as hypnotic as a successful video game. " An intriguing potrait of what it takes to succeed in today's competitive computer industry." (Washington Post Book World)

"Game Over...is ultimately less absorbing than 'Tetris' but not by much. The opening chapter alone stuns us... A fascinating insider's loook into the Nintendo juggernaut."(Wall Street Journal) -- The New York Times

About the Author

David Sheff's articles have appeared in Playboy, Rolling Stone, The Observer, and Foreign Literature(in Russia), among other publications, and on National Public Radio's All Things Considered. His book The Playboy Interviews with John Lennon and Yoko Ono was a Literary Guild Selection. Sheff lives in Northern California with his wife, Karen Barbour, and son, Nicolas.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Dan Amrich on November 27, 2000
Format: Paperback
How Sheff (and Eddy) got this kind of info may never be fully revealed, but this book is positively required reading for anybody even remotely interested in how the game business really works. At times, it reads like a spy novel--the intrigue revealed in the battle over the rights to Tetris could stand as its own adventure--and reveals many personal details about how Nintendo went from a humble family-owned playing card company (!) to one of the most powerful digital entertainment brands in the world. The book doubles as a brief history of video gaming in general, making it absolutely indispensable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By William E. Hunter on May 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
A fine history of Nintendo, one of the largest videogame companies operating today, which parlayed its success with the Donkey Kong arcade francise into its replacement of Atari as the company name ubiquitous with videogaming. The original portion was written by David Sheff, obviously someone with a lot of access to the notoriously tightly-knit inner sanctum of Mother N. It is followed up by new chapters by Andy Eddy.
Everything you would expect is here, from Nintendo's humble beginnings as a Hanafuda playing-card company in 1889 to the release of the N64 game console in 1996. During the journey we are introduced to all of the players involved, along with their facinating bios. From Japanese president Hiroshi Yamauchi, to game design wunderkind Sigeru Miyamoto, to Nintendo of America head Minoru Arakawa...we follow the early stumbles of the fledgling company, and its rise to the top of the vicious, cut-throat videogame market with the help of some Western allies. Game Over delivers both a facinating glimpse into the operations of a Japanese conglomerate, as well as a thrill-ride though the volatile games industry. Author of the original book Sheff adopts an easy-going, if somewhat dry, prose style...but it still reads better than your typical business tome.
You know that any company as tight-lipped and controlling as Nintendo is going to try and put the thumb on any would-be biographer looking for privledged access, and while I won't go so far as to call Game Over biased towards Nintendo, it certainly does lean towards the point-of-view of its subject matter.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
I am a very big Nintendo fan, and it was very interesting for me to learn about the history of this company. This book is very well written, but is also a little biased against Nintendo. Overall I think all Nintendo fans and video game fans in general will find this book very interesting.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Finch on February 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book rocks! I've been a loyal fan of Nintendo since the NES, have followed and done research for many years, but never did I realize everything that went on in and around Nintendo. From it's humble beginnings in 1889 to the present, this book does an excellent job of portraying the events that have made Nintendo the company it is today. Whether you love Nintendo, love to read, or even if you just need it for a book report (like me), this book is for you. Simply put, I couldn't put it down.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 16, 1999
Format: Paperback
David's book on Nintendo's rise to the top is interesting and gives an insight to how a Japanese video games company among other things conquered the US market and got the rights to Tetris for the Game Boy.
But I miss information on Nintendo's operations in Europe and to some extent Japan. And as the book ends in the 16-bit console era its more of a history lesson than a guide to the contemporary video games market.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 14, 1999
Format: Paperback
Game Over: Press Start to Continue is an easy-to-read story of the history of Nintendo. It's a must read for anybody in the games industry plus an interesting read for anybody who's ever played a video game.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Blue-Rat on March 19, 2001
Format: Paperback
A business book that has a solid narrative is a rarity, and this book, in explaining the history of videogames, is just such a rarity. An exceptionally interesting one at that.
See how ruthless Nintendo could be! See how incompetent Nintendo can be! Watch as the book finishes just as the 16 bit console market begins!
I was a little bit annoyed by Sheff's book-dedication to his child, that although they used to like videogames, they now like reading better. A little bit snobby from a book devoted to videogames: the new leisure pastime of the millennium. Or whatever.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By A Customer on March 22, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is an excellent read. I highly reccomend it to all people interested in the video game business. It is very engrossing. Like most people, I enjoy the Tetris section... However, the book is slightly biased. The author does show some distaste towards Nintendo (the previous title was "Game Over: How Nintendo zapped an American industry, captured your dollars and enslaved your children"). He also includes some odd statements about Japan conquering the world through this little NES. But other than that, a truly great book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search