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A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire book 1)
by George R. R. Martin
4.5 out of 5 stars (7,290)
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Because, books mirror the world we live in. As a writer I know this keenly, even when writing fantasy where you quite literally make your own rules...you use what you know, base your characters on real people, real amazing events, class structure, local customs, laws...everything and one more point I wish to make...There is no such thing as original thought, the best we can do is make it as close as and as fresh as possible. But all the unique ideas you have, even if you believe they are completely your own, and indeed your imagination makes them so and is your only limit, someone somewhere has had the same thought. Or someone somewhere has done what you write and what you write will always be influenced by what you know of the life you live in. Cheers, Michael M. Leathers
Dec 29, 2006 by Michael Thibodeaux
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I think he'll finish the series but with so many other commitments it will take him years to finish. I agree with what you said about Feast Of Crows is was slightly below par compared to his other works but at the same time I think it was vital he tell that part of the story to set the readers up for A Dance Of Dragons. I think all fans are hoping that A Dance Of Dragons will match up to his better work, fro what i've read of the book so far it looks to be amazing.
Nov 28, 2008 by Amazon Customer
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People don't like 4 or 5 because they had to wait *forever* for them and each one only deals with half of the cast...Tyrion fans had to wait basically a decade to find out what he was up to, and they got upset. New readers do not have that problem. Many complain about a "slow pace;" personally, I like to think of the books as living history. Wars are not a constant, never-ending stream of battles. Life itself has a slow pace. When you read it with a desperate desire to find out what happens next, you will be disappointed. When you allow yourself to sink into the world, the pace doesn't grate so much. I've read each book twice - first time through, I found myself angry because "nothing had happened." When I read them again, and started trying to predict what would happen in 6 and 7, actively engaging with the material rather than allowing myself to be fed a story? I was astonished at how much I had actually missed, how much material was actually there in those hundreds of pages of "nothing happening." The people who don't like 4 and 5 probably didn't like "The Two Towers" because of "all the walking." Personally, I didn't mind. It's simply a matter of preference. The worst that happens if you jump in and don't feel like finishing the series, but still want to know what happens, is that you'll have to watch the excellent HBO show or consult the extensive Wikipedia and ASOIAF.wiki articles detailing the plot.
Jul 8, 2012 by Tara
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I do know for sure that book one of the series follows season one, appropriately both titled "A Game of Thrones." From what I gather about the second season so far (which I'm halfway through watching) it follows the second book, titled "A Clash of Kings," (and predictably there is a clash of five possible kings throughout the season, and book). However, to answer your question I would not necessarily start on book three if you're thinking of getting a jump on the storyline. I haven't read far into the book series, but what I've read so far the books differ slightly but significantly from the TV series in a few ways. (Trust me, try reading the books from the beginning and you'll enjoy them way more, and especially appreciate the TV series more as well :) Hope this helped, and from what I've heard the third book (A Storm of Swords) will be divided among two seasons, so there may be more time to read the series--which I probably need to do!
Jun 5, 2012 by Evyan G.
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Or his father.
Jul 19, 2011 by M. Bethke
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To be honest, GRRM ASoIaF does have some disturbing moments. I personally dont want to reccomend it because of the sex in the first book. However, with the exception of the one between Ceresi and Jaime (which i thought was a rape when I read it (I was 12, dont worry I stopped once I got to Daenarys scenes) they are not particularly necesary to the series. However, one must not be totally ignorant of these things, for GRRM has a sense of humour akin to a teenage boy (I should know, I am one), and much of the humor of the series comes in jokes regarding sex (TYRION). There is also random moments between Tyrion and his whore, where she goes into his pants for all of two seconds, yet that is as bad as it gets. I cant deny i laughed at the sex jokes though. If you are bothered by graphic scenes, avoid the TV show which puts it in for no other reason than to make people stare. As to graphic rape scenes, i dont even remember the one that K Johnson spoke of. Closest it got to being a graphic rape scene that I remember was the mob in the second book.
Jul 18, 2012 by CURLYMAN
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Alfonso, < I don't really want to read the 1st book if it's almost the same as the 1st season. > You really should as there is extra information in the book that was not in the HBO series. Somehow, I think this information may provide clues to some unanswered questions that may be dealt with later in the series. But, you may be able to read it faster because you have seen the show (which is what I did). I just finished reading A GAME OF THRONES, and now I am reading A CLASH OF KINGS. IMO, it is really worth starting from the beginning!
Jul 1, 2011 by K. Therese
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Oh no! They've read Tolkien? After that, there's nothing that compares. I could recommend other good stuff, but then it would be apples and oranges. I can think of nothing that matches Tolkien's combination of (1) quality, complexity & sophistication, on the one hand; and (2) compulsive entertainment value, on the other hand; and (3) age appropriateness. Commercially-successful Tolkien imitators include Terry Brooks and Robert Jordan. I found Terry Brooks unreadable, and never ventured Robert Jordan. I might recommend Lewis' Narnia series (which is good, though not as good as Tolkien); but then you might suspect me of trying to convert your kids to Christianity. More in the line of horror are two of HP Lovecraft's longer works THE CASE OF CHARLES DEXTER WARD, and AT THE MOUNTAINS OF MADNESS, both of which I liked, though characterization is not a strong point. Both works manage to avoid the virulent racism that crops up in some of HPL's other work. More specifically kid-oriented horror is John Bellairs THE HOUSE WITH A CLOCK IN ITS WALLS. Probably his best novel. He wrote many many others, but I'm afraid it's probably all downhill from there. I remember enjoying H. Rider Haggard's KING SOLOMON'S MINES at that age. But I remember very little about it now. I suppose it probably contains 19th century racial attitudes. You might try to introduce them to the real ancient classics (The Iliad, the Odyssey, Beowulf, etc.) But this would not have worked with me at that age.
Feb 19, 2013 by J. Whelan
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In my opinion, it gets better and the pace picks up in books 2 and 3, then slows down a lot more in 4 and 5. I've still enjoyed all the books, but if you find the first one to be really slow you probably won't like the most recent two.
May 15, 2012 by L. Ping
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Hi It's in the first book.
Jun 27, 2011 by michaela
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