Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Gamemaster Screen (Star Wars Roleplaying Game) Paperback – February 1, 2001


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$64.49 $25.00

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Bone Clocks" by David Mitchell.

Product Details

  • Series: Star Wars Accessory
  • Paperback: 8 pages
  • Publisher: Wizards of the Coast (February 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786918330
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786918331
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.5 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,249,614 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Originally from Indianapolis, Indiana, JD Wiker is a writer and game designer with over forty roleplaying game titles to his credit. After working as a designer for Seattle-based Wizards of the Coast, JD moved to the San Diego area and worked as an Intellectual Properties content manager and game designer for Upper Deck Entertainment. He relocated to the Washington D.C. area in 2008 to work on Mythic Entertainment's Warhammer Online MMORPG, then returned to Seattle in 2010 to work as lead writer for Runic Games, the design studio responsible for Torchlight.

After leaving Wizards of the Coast, JD helped found the d20 System design studio The Game Mechanics (www.thegamemechanics.com), while also freelancing for Wizards of the Coast and Paizo Publishing.

He currently lives in Seattle, Washington with his wife, Keri.

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Eric Graff on May 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
It seems as though every game out there has developed a GM"s screen. I can still remember the oooold AD&D screens: back then, there was a player's screen and a DM's screen, and my personal DM had taped the two together into a huge shield that covered almost half of our card-table gaming area.
Those days, it seems are long gone. Modern games (especially the D20 system) require less and less charts, graphs and tables to run. The "new-wave" games are slick, streamlined, and make sure that very little of the storytelling experience is slowed down by chunky rules and the flipping of pages. Thusly, there are fewer instances where a GM needs to glance at charts.
Nonetheless, it is indeed helpful to have a screen to secure the GM's "secret notes" from the all-prying eyes of her greedy players. In this respect, the Star Wars screen is alright, but not "awesome".
It, like the game itself, is very similar to the D&D screen. In fact, most of the charts are SW versions of D&D charts. For instance, the Fundamental Actions in Combat chart is the exact same chart as on the D&D screen, but instead of the column that lists "5-foot step?" (allowed), it reads: "2-meter step?" (allowed), with "yes" or "no" listed for each action.
The SW screen also lacked any of the important Force- and Starship- tables. I was dissapointed to find that Vitality-point costs and starship size modifiers were not present on this screen (luckily I typed up the tables myself a few weeks before I purchased the screen).
The main saving grace for my four-star rating was the presence of the "Multiple Ranged Attacks" table, taken straight from the Combat section of the rulebook.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By James R. Jenkins on March 3, 2001
Format: Paperback
So it's no secret that having a GM screen is important both for hiding your die rolls and having quick reference information on the other side. I you GM frequently, you should probably have one of these.
I, however, have simply taken a folder and photocopied the information I know I frequently refer to from the Core Rulebook. I've even drawn a cool scene on the outer side. The screen I've made works better for me than the screen from Wizards does.
However, the GM screen doesn't exactly cost a fortune. If you'd rather buy one than go through the work to make one, I wouldn't call it unwise.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Lucas M. Engelhardt on January 17, 2003
Format: Paperback
Being a brand new GM, and a pretty new gamer (been doing it for less than a year), I felt it beneficial to get a screen for my first campaign.
This is a decent screen, has lots of charts that we prefer not to memorize (cover and concealment, in particular), and is lacking others (starship combat especially). Pretty much all this has already been mentioned in other reviews.
The reason it only gets three stars from me is that I am using the Expanded and Revised Rule Book, so some of the charts are outdated. Fortunately, after a few minutes of pencil marking the screen, I had it fully updated, so it wasn't a big deal. But, be aware before you buy it. If you have the Revised Core Rulebook, be sure to crosscheck before you just accept the screen. Of course, as a GM it's up to you if you prefer the Revised rules...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again