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  • Warner Gangsters Collection, Vol. 4 (The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse / Invisible Stripes / Kid Galahad / Larceny, Inc. / The Little Giant / Public Enemies: The Golden Age of the Gangster Film)
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Warner Gangsters Collection, Vol. 4 (The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse / Invisible Stripes / Kid Galahad / Larceny, Inc. / The Little Giant / Public Enemies: The Golden Age of the Gangster Film)


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Warner Gangsters Collection, Vol. 4 (The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse / Invisible Stripes / Kid Galahad / Larceny, Inc. / The Little Giant / Public Enemies: The Golden Age of the Gangster Film) + Warner Gangsters Collection: Vol. 3 (Smart Money / Picture Snatcher / The Mayor of Hell / Lady Killer / Black Legion / Brother Orchid) + Warner Gangsters Collection, Vol. 2 (Bullets or Ballots / City for Conquest / Each Dawn I Die / G Men / San Quentin / A Slight Case of Murder)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Edward G. Robinson, Humphrey Bogart, Bette Davis, Mary Astor, George Raft
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Box set, Black & White, Full Screen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 1.0)
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 6
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: October 21, 2008
  • Run Time: 518 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001ASQ9OC
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #27,509 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Warner Gangsters Collection, Vol. 4 (The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse / Invisible Stripes / Kid Galahad / Larceny, Inc. / The Little Giant / Public Enemies: The Golden Age of the Gangster Film)" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Includes:
  • The Amazing Doctor Clitterhouse
  • Commentary by historians Dr. Drew Casper and Richard Jewell
  • Vintage newsreel
  • Your True Adventure series short Night Intruder
  • Musical short Toyland Casino
  • Classic cartoon Count Me Out
  • Trailers
  • Audio-only bonus: Edward G. Robinson in two radio show adaptations
  • The Little Giant
  • Commentary by historians Daniel Bubbeo and John McCarty
  • Musical short Use Your Imagination
  • Classic cartoon The Dish Ran Away with the Spoon
  • Larceny Inc.
  • Commentary by historians Haden Guest and Dana Polan
  • John Huston's Oscar-nominated patriotic short Winning Your Wings
  • Classic cartoons Porky's Pastry Pirates and The Wabbit Who Came to Supper
  • Invisible Stripes
  • Commentary by historians Alain Silver and James Ursini
  • Technicolor historical short The Monroe Doctrine
  • Two musical shorts Mrs. and Mrs. Jesse Crawford at Home and Quiet Please
  • Classic cartoons Bars and Stripes Forever and Hare-Um Scare-Um
  • Kid Galahad
  • Commentary by historians Art Simon and Robert Sklar
  • Comedy short Postal Union
  • Your True Adventure series short Alibi Mark
  • Classic cartoons Egghead Rides Again, I Wanna Be a Sailor, and Porky's Super Service
  • New documentary Public Enemies: The Golden Age of the Gangster Film
  • Classic gangster-themed cartoons: I Like Mountain Music, She Was an Acrobat's Daughter, Racketeer Rabbit, and Bugs and Thugs

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Warner Gangsters Collection Volume 4 (DVD)

Amazon.com

The highlight of Warner's latest gangster collection is the best film since Vol. 1--the 1937 Kid Galahad. This is a terrific picture, among the studio's most satisfying offerings of the '30s, with unlikely co-stars Edward G. Robinson and Bette Davis establishing warm rapport as a fight promoter and his longtime lady friend, and director Michael Curtiz in championship form. Although it's only secondarily a gangster film--boxing and affairs of the heart top the bill--the potential for gangland violence is never far away thanks to Humphrey Bogart's steely malevolence as a rival boxing manager. Also featured are Wayne Morris, ingratiating as the farmboy who becomes Robinson's new fighter; Harry Carey as his trainer; and Jane Bryan--a Warner player who could do sweet and radiant without becoming cloying--as Robinson's young sister. Both she and city girl Davis--known in her social circle as "Fluff"--fall in love with Galahad, and the scene when they deal with that is smartly written (by Seton I. Miller) and played. Vol. 4 is virtually an Edward G. Robinson collection, since he stars in all but one of the movies. The set's other gem is The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse (1938), an atypically glossy item with Robinson wonderfully droll as a Park Avenue doctor moonlighting as a jewel thief. He's doing research for a book on criminals, which leads to his becoming "the Professor," the brains behind a gang run by Claire Trevor and Humphrey Bogart (and including Allen Jenkins, Maxie Rosenbloom, Ward Bond, and Vladimir Sokoloff). Directed by Anatole Litvak, the movie's a milestone of sorts in the career of another filmmaker: co-screenwriter John Huston. Its coziness with criminality as "a left-handed form of human endeavor" anticipates Huston's great The Asphalt Jungle. Also, the picture marks his first association with Bogart, whose stardom he'd help to shape. And Bogart, Robinson, and Trevor would all be reunited under Huston's direction on Key Largo.

The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse has its dark side; The Little Giant and Larceny, Inc. are broad comedies pure and simple. From the outset, Robinson chafed against his stereotyping in gangster roles, and The Little Giant (1933), as the title suggests, gave him the chance to turn "Little Caesar" on his head. With Franklin D. Roosevelt's election spelling doom for the bootlegging business, "Bugs" Ahern (Eddie G.) retires from mob life to get some culture and mingle with the swells on the polo fields of California. Roy Del Ruth directed, albeit with less pizzazz than usual. Larceny, Inc. (1942) finds newly paroled convicts Robinson and Broderick Crawford taking over a Manhattan luggage store that happens to sit next to a bank that, alas, economic setback may compel them to rob. The movie has its charms--inconveniently for their plans, the guys' business becomes a success and sparks a revival of their Gotham neighborhood--but it's distinctly inferior to the other gangster comedies in which Lloyd Bacon directed Robinson, A Slight Case of Murder (in Vol. 2) and Brother Orchid (Vol. 3). This was the final film Robinson made under his long Warner contract. (Incidentally, the audio commentary on it is bone-crushingly pedantic.) Lloyd Bacon also directed Invisible Stripes (1939), starring George Raft as a not-very-hardened criminal trying to go straight following a prison term. Trouble is, society keeps distrusting him, and when it appears his desperate younger brother (William Holden) might turn to crime, Raft agrees to abet his old prison-mate Humphrey Bogart on some holdups. At a double-feature-ready length of 80 minutes, Invisible Stripes feels like an A-movie struggling to break out of B constraints. There's some excellent stuff, as when garage mechanic Holden and the sweetheart (Jane Bryan) he can't afford to marry cross paths with wealthy revelers out on the town; and Raft and Bogart convincingly have a friendship above and beyond the obligations of genre plotting. But like the underdressed neighborhood street scenes (in contrast to the flavorful busyness customarily observed in Warner gangster pictures), mostly the movie leaves us wanting more. And that includes more of the gang's-all-here supporting cast: Paul Kelly, Marc Lawrence, Joseph Downing, Bert Hanlon, Frank Faylen, et al. Completing Vol. 4 is Public Enemies: The Golden Age of the Gangster Film (2008), a feature-length documentary that serves up solid history and astutely chosen clips, from The Great Train Robbery (1903) through GoodFellas (1990). A small army of commentators holds forth on the gangster film as "the myth for the urban immigrant," and there's lots of anecdotal material about not only icons Cagney, Robinson, and Bogart ("the badder bad guy" brought in as the two previous stars turned legit) but also key directors and writers. Tasty. --Richard T. Jameson

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 23 customer reviews
Some a little more popular than others in the set but all very good.
Debbie Wagner
Claire Trevor co-stars as a savvy crime queen, and Humphrey Bogart plays Rocks Valentine, whom Robinson calls "a magnificent specimen of pure viciousness."
calvinnme
I recommend this collection for anyone who enjoys the classic gangster movies.
Ms Missy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Douglas M VINE VOICE on June 20, 2008
Format: DVD
The fourth collection in Warner's Gangster sets contains more unsung gems from Warner Brothers, the studio whose product stands up the best of all today. The reasons are simple - they had the best actors and their production environment produced dynamic economical unpretentious entertainments. This set contains 4 starring vehicles for Edward G Robinson and 3 supporting roles for Humprey Bogart.

- "The Little Giant" is a pre code 1933 vehicle, a typical smart comic melodrama with Robinson as a beer baron who mixes in society, a not dissimilar theme to the later and far superior "A Slight Case of Murder". In this case, Robinson is still a bit close to "Little Ceasar" to be funny and the main interest is the endless slang and pre-code innuendo.
- From 1937, "Kid Galahad" is an exciting prize fight melodrama. Robinson is paired with a very attractive Bette Davis as his moll and together, they tear up the screen with their magnetism. Bogart and Robinson have a great shoot out at the end of the film.
- "The Amazing Dr Clitterhouse", released in 1938 and based on a successful West End play, stars Robinson as a surgeon who infiltrates a gang to analyse the criminal mind. With Bogart in support as a particularly vicious crook and the attractive and brittle Claire Trevor as the leader of the gang, this film, as directed by Anatole Litvak, is more polished than the usual Warner's programmer. The story is ambiguous with a very clever climax; a most unusual and interesting film.
- by 1939, the gangster cycle had just about runs its course and the Hays Code was more interested in how the gangster reformed than how he operated. "Invisible Stripes" is more a social melodrama than a gangster film and stars the wooden George Raft as an ex-crim trying to re-establish himself while on parole.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By calvinnme HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 28, 2008
Format: DVD
The films in this edition of the Warner Gangsters are The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse, The Little Giant, Larceny, Inc., Invisible Stripes and Kid Galahad. The films contain bonus features such as rarely-seen Warner Bros. shorts, vintage newsreels and classic cartoons, plus original theatrical trailers. Also included in the collection is an all-new Warner Home Video feature-length documentary, Public Enemies: The Golden Age of the Gangster Film which takes a detailed look at the crime genre and how it came about. Kid Galahad will be available as a single title. Notably absent in this set is James Cagney, but we have just about all of his gangster films on DVD now. All that's left are his precodes that don't really fit into the gangster genre.

The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse (1938)
Dr. Clitterhouse (Edward G. Robinson) is fascinated by the study of the physical and mental states of lawbreakers, so he joins a gang of jewel thieves for a closer look in this dark comedy. Claire Trevor co-stars as a savvy crime queen, and Humphrey Bogart plays Rocks Valentine, whom Robinson calls "a magnificent specimen of pure viciousness." The movie also marks the start of one of film's most noteworthy collaborations. John Huston, who was to later direct Bogart in The Maltese Falcon, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and The African Queen, co-wrote the screenplay of The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse.

Special Features:
Commentary by Dr.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Robert Badgley on July 29, 2009
Format: DVD
The final volume of this series finally clocks in and it is heavy on the Edward G.Robinson,and that is definitely a good thing.I am glad Warner's has put these titles out there for our enjoyment and re-assessment of his considerable acting talents.
"The Amazing Dr.Clitterhouse",released in July of /38(4-4 1/2 stars),stars Edward G.Robinson as Dr Clitterhouse.He is a well educated and spoken physician/surgeon in the city with a flourishing practice.But the good doctor,as the picture opens,has just committed his fourth robbery by heisting some jewels out of the upstairs safe of a friends home.The doctor has immersed himself into criminology,specificially the study of criminals,their behaviour and reactions of same.The fence he finds for his takings is one Joe Keller(Claire Trevor) and her head man Rocks Valentine(Bogart).He ingratiates himself into Joe's favour and he joins the gang for a period of six weeks to study them in depth for his research and an eventual book;he does blood work,takes blood pressure readings and their reactions to light,stress,etc.Rocks doesn't like Clitterhouse and tries at one point to kill him;unsuccessfully.The six weeks come and go and the doctor leaves but Rocks learns the doctors location,confiscates his research and wants to use his office as his front.Clitterhouse is backed into a corner and kills Rocks.He is found out and put on trial.With a top lawyer friend for his defense,and in spite of almost blowing his own case,the doctor gets off with an insanity plea.
The screenplay co-written by future director John Huston is an engrossing one and Robinson is on top of his game in this film.Bogie also turns in a powerful and menacing performance as Rocks.
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