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Ganymede (The Clockwork Century) Paperback – September 27, 2011


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Ganymede (The Clockwork Century) + The Inexplicables (The Clockwork Century) + Dreadnought (The Clockwork Century)
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Product Details

  • Series: The Clockwork Century (Book 3)
  • Paperback: 349 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; Original edition (September 27, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780765329462
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765329462
  • ASIN: 0765329468
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 1 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #66,369 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for The Clockwork Century:

“An intimate, well-crafted portrait of a nurse on a mission adds depth to this exceptional Civil War steampunk thriller.”
--Publishers Weekly, starred review, on Dreadnought

Dreadnought offers plenty of fun: fast-paced battle scenes, thundering locomotives and the gem of the book, its heroine. Vivid, believable and endearingly stubborn, she’s an enjoyable companion for those taking the time to read a book which challenges the notion that steampunk must assume Victorian attitudes with its goggles and corsets.”
--Seattle Times

Boneshaker is without a doubt Cherie Priest’s breakthrough work: this hollering, stamping, crackling thing is the best fun you’ll have with a book all year.”
--Warren Ellis

“A propulsive, breathless read, an action movie that tears across the country, stopping just long enough to take snapshots of the race and gender politics of the time, to put a human face on history.”
--The Stranger on Dreadnought

About the Author

Cherie Priest is the author of Dreadnought and Boneshaker, which was nominated for a Nebula and Hugo Award, won the Locus Award for best science-fiction novel, and was named Steampunk Book of the Year by steampunk.com. She is also the author of the near-contemporary fantasy Fathom, and she debuted to great acclaim with Four and Twenty Blackbirds, Wings to the Kingdom, and Not Flesh Nor Feathers, a trilogy of Southern Gothic ghost stories featuring heroine Eden Moore. Born in Tampa, Florida, Priest earned her master’s in rhetoric at the University of Tennessee. She lives in Seattle, Washington, with her husband, Aric, and a fat black cat named Spain.

More About the Author

Cherie Priest is the author of more than a dozen books, including the steampunk pulp adventures Dreadnought, Clementine, Ganymede, and Boneshaker. Boneshaker was nominated for both the Hugo Award and the Nebula Award; it was a PNBA Award winner, and winner of the Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel. Cherie also wrote Fathom and the Eden Moore series from Tor (Macmillan), Bloodshot and Hellbent for Bantam, and three novellas published by Subterranean Press. In addition to all of the above, she is a newly minted member of the Wild Cards Consortium - and her first foray into George R. R. Martin's superhero universe, Fort Freak (for which she wrote the frame story), debuted in 2011. Cherie's short stories and nonfiction articles have appeared in such fine publications as Weird Tales, Subterranean Magazine, Publishers Weekly, The Living Dead 2, and the Thackeray T. Lambshead Cabinet of Curiosities. She presently lives in Chattanooga, TN, with her husband, a fluffy young dog, and a fat black cat.

Customer Reviews

Not too much action, and not too little, but just right.
H. K. Snapp
My girlfriend loves this book series, I haven't read this one in particular but she wont stop raving about it.
Michael H. Lynch
The story was too "safe" as far as character interactions.
Grimjack13

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By C. Barnes on October 17, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm a big fan of the Clockwork Century world. I don't get caught up in the little differences between its history and geography and reality. Boneshaker is one of my favorite books, and I was glued to Clementine and Dreadnought. I was very excited for Ganymede.

When I finished reading I was still excited. It was a good, fast read. But, as I reflected on it in the following days I realized it was a very "safe" story. In many circumstances when the author has a chance to introduce conflict or some other form of Murphy's law, she simply didn't. I equate it to watching a suspenseful movie... and your thinking to yourself (or yelling at the television), "No! Don't go in there!". This book is written such that they didn't "go in there". The main characters in the book rarely encountered adversity, always made the right choices, and the story concluded. It would have so much more interesting of they had "gone in there".

In addition to the safe story line, there are many characters introduced (or carried over from previous books) that simply don't matter. There is a Voodoo Queen that is described as foreboding and dangerous, but you don't get any of that. A new Texian general comes to town, but doesn't really make any problems. A life-long friend is introduced and then forgotten. And a familiar Texas Ranger enters the story only to do nothing (but maybe set up another book - which I'll eagerly read).

Now, the story does give us a little more of Briar Wilkes and son, you get some more from Mr. Swakhammer and daughter, and you find out that post-Boneshaker Seattle is the same, but different.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Grimjack13 on October 21, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've been reading all of Cheri Priest's Steampunk stories and so far this is one best yet. I didn't really care for Boneshaker but Clementine brought me back and onward to Dreadnought and Ganymede. I originally bought Boneshaker for my wife because I thought it was a steampunk/zombie story, she is into the whole zombie/slash/anything genre. She's weird, but I'll keep her.

Anyway Ganymede and the rest of Clockwork Century storyline is quite a bit more than that. The alternate world she is creating and its opposing views, revised history and different characters are intriguing. Yankees, Confederates, swamp guerilla fighters, heart of gold prostitutes, air pirates, Texicans and zombies, it's all cool and it's not in England. Nothing against the English but Jules Verne was French and The Wild Wild West was an American pre-steampunk production. Cheri Priest's works are different and so far I've liked them. The stories seem to be getting stronger at least in the extended American Civil War arena that she is crafting. I also like the fact that her version of steampunk is mostly technical as opposed to magical.

I do agree with C. Barnes as to the lack of character conflicts. Everybody seems to get along just a little too well. The story was too "safe" as far as character interactions. I do like the characters; she has definitely crafted her characters well and gives them their own "voice." But I think their "voice" would be portrayed stronger with more adversity and interpersonal friction to address. A giant white man and his crew are accepted into the inner circle of a group of rough and tumble black guerilla fighters, surrounded by white enemies like Johnnie Rebs and Texicans, just a little too easily. There was just not enough friction between the characters.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on October 7, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Of all the many things I admire and enjoy about Ms. Priest writing, the foremost is how each of her character has their own voice. Ganymede is the newest volume in her Clockwork Century series of interconnected books set on a North American continent where the Civil War has lasted for 20 some years. This one concerns the attempt to get a prototype submersible from Lake Pontchartrain to the Union blockade. It features Andan Cly who was first introduce in Boneshaker and Josephine Early a free woman of color who runs a ladies boarding house and is working to free New Orleans from the Republic of Texas' occupation forces. This books has airships, pirates, spies, Texas rangers, Chinese drug lords,prostitute, giant catfishes and zombies. It is American steam punk at its best and I recommend it and its companions book without reservation as great reading fun.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jillian Igarashi on July 14, 2013
Format: Paperback
I'm starting to really admire alternate universe settings in novels, especially when they involve my favorite of all favorite cities, (Greg Bear's Slant and Neal Stephenson's Reamde), so when I decided to venture into the murky, brassy waters of Steampunk, I just had to pick up Cherie Priest-the so-called "High Priestess of Steampunk," according to Seattle Times. I chose Ganymede at random from Priest's "The Clockwork Century" arsenal (which also includes Boneshaker, Dreadnought, Clementine, and The Inexplicables), expecting a fun romp covering Seattle and New Orleans by fantasized airships run by pirates and prostitutes.

And that's exactly what I got. Ganymede is a romp, filled with the usual ne'er-do-wells you fully expect in a novel set in sinful, sumptuous New Orleans and the barbaric frontiers of the Northwest. It's also filled with fun ideas, fun conflict, and mildly fun character conflicts. But Ganymede doesn't go farther than "fun."

Read the rest of my review over here: [...]
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