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20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a wild, inspiring read, September 18, 2000
This review is from: Garbage and the Goddess: The last miracles and final spiritual instructions of Bubba Free John (Paperback)
While I question much of Free John's intentions and consider him to be something of a self-aggrandizing narcissist, this book is well worth reading. It's an account of several months in 1974 when the Guru engaged his community in a series of outrageous sexual and ecstatic practices perhaps intended to open his devotees to the immanent divine. Was Da really just doing this to gratify himself, was he serving his devotees in this wild way, or both? In any case, it's a potent vision of spiritual practice that is all-inclusive. In this half-dead age, the presence of such a spiritual wildman, even a (quite possibly)crazed one, is a phenomenon worthy of deep consideration.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sick (in the modern teanage meaning)!, April 13, 2014
This review is from: Garbage and the Goddess: The last miracles and final spiritual instructions of Bubba Free John (Paperback)
Grotesquely funny, sexually dirty and horrifying! In His third book, readers are confronted with an excruciatingly detailed glimpse of a loved up, sex inducing cult leader and His cataclysmic and devastating climax as the seal of the eternal Avatars.

In other words, this is a jaw dropping, wollopingly fun read!!! It is a product of its time, you see, and should be treated as such. Those days must have been great fun! The USA tried to be like Vedic India but psycho's exploited the movement because we moderns are not mature enough for the Spirit, so Adi Da took advantage along with the rest. I must admit, however, the man could philosophise like Krishna!

No wonder this guys early books are selling for a big price on Amazon. Trust me, they are great and worth your time!

If He got ran over by a bus in the early 1980's, I am convinced that He would be talked about in the same breath as Ramana Maharshi. He was that brilliant and His early books attest to a fierce intellect and they are dazzling to behold, to hold in your hands, to have a feel and a peep into the crazy wisdom school of spirituality. They don't make'em like this anymore. His books speak to eternity and the eternal never dates, or dies.

You can probably tell that I have a soft spot for this guy. People scratch their hollow sculls wondering how Adi Da managed to brain wash all those people? These people know nothing of the workings of man, Adi Da did, this is the difference between them and He.

Terence McKenna says somewhere that culture is a cult and so all that is needed for a guy to take advantage is to control the cultural momentum. If one is clever enough and evil enough. Franklin Jones was one such verisimilitude of evil. He was the evil Terence McKenna. McKenna refused to anoint himself divine, Adi Da wouldn't let that sort of modesty get in His way.

The word of the Avatar sings from His books, He left suffering mankind!

Buy the early books before they disappear forever!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ADI DA's FOURTH BOOK, OF HIS "CRAZY WISDOM" PHASE, January 16, 2014
This review is from: Garbage and the Goddess: The last miracles and final spiritual instructions of Bubba Free John (Paperback)
Adi Da Samraj (1939-2008) was born Franklin Albert Jones, but was also known as Bubba Free John, Da Free John, Da Love-Ananda, etc., until from 1991 until his death he settled on Adi Da Love-Ananda Samraj [or just "Adi Da"]. He became a famous and controversial spiritual teacher beginning in the 1970s counterculture. His movement has been criticized as cultic, abusive, etc., although his followers remain devoted to him, and often live in one of his five "Adidam" churches (including his main one on an island in Fiji). He wrote many books, including The Method of the Siddhas,, Four Fundamental Questions, Aham Da Asmi (Beloved, I Am Da), Ruchira Avatara Gita: The Avataric Way of the Divine Heart-Master, Da Love-Ananda Gita: The Free Avataric Gift of the Divine Love-Bliss, Hridaya Rosary: Four Thorns of Heart-Instruction, Eleutherios (The Only Truth That Sets The Heart Free), and his autobiography, The knee of listening [revised as The Knee Of Listening: The Divine Ordeal of the Avataric Incarnation of Conscious Light].

He says, "You are not going to heaven from here. You are going to die: literally and absolutely. Not just a little bit. It is not just your body that is going to die. YOU are going to die, and that is the truth. All of those consoling philosophies try to make you assume that only your body is going to die, and somehow you, the same as you are now, are going to pop out and zap around in some wilderness of light. That is absolutely not going to happen. You are going to DIE. So you must realize, during life, that real and prior Condition of existence which is always already transcending psycho-physical life..." (Pg. 12-13)

He states, "the cult of marriage is a principal obstacle in the affair of the spiritual Commuity, because the common theatre of marriage is a fundamental instrument for locking out the life-energy, the ecstatic life-communication, from other beings." (Pg. 31) He adds, "At times alcohol and the common social forms of celebration serve to break down the illusory time-space separation between these two dimensions. There have been a number of occasions when, because I had been drinking, my subtle presence and the presence of others on the subtler dimention began to become visible to others who were in the room." (Pg. 90-91)

But in a few months, "By the middle of May several months of extravagant eating and drinking had begun to take their toll on health... Bubba returned from a short visit to San Francisco and declared a number of changes in the Ashram's present style of life. Everyone would resume a straight lacot-vegetarian diet the following Monday, and fast for seven to ten days a week later. Bubba said that he intended us to continue this phase of Ashram life until early July, a period of about six weeks. That same day Bubba told Sal and Neil to move out of his house, and back to their wives. So everyone began to prepare for the new regime, after what seemed like months of continual partying. Even so, that weekend Bubba held the most uproarious extended party this Ashram has ever enjoyed." (Pg. 135)

He told a devotee, "So the Guru's perfect function is to undermine all this, to make the world show itself. He makes the Goddess pull down her pants, and then you see her a_____e.... Let her face you with her b____ts falling out... The Goddess used to say, 'Yield to me,' and I f____d her brains loose. I've never listened to anyone. Perhaps I should have!" (Pg. 106-107) Then, "Bubba began to ask certain women to move into his household. Eventually, all of them performed practical functions in the community, but their primary function was that of 'gopi,' or one who adores the Lord in human form, and this was something new to the Ashram." (Pg. 134)

He explains, "I will not remain personally in contact with the Community or any devotee after my death... I will remain only Perfectly Present... Therefore, what will remain behind me will be a Community, not a cult. The Divine will remain immediately and directly Present through the agency of my total Community of devotees. Among all future devotees I may be acknowledged as Teacher.... and recollected along with the body of Teaching. But no cultic relationship to my possibly continued personal presence after death will be necessary or appropriate in order for devotees to enjoy the Siddhi and Person of the Divine which will always remain in the Satsang of the Community." (Pg. 206) He admits, "the Guru has no sense of identification even with his present life. I have no more sense of identity with Franklin Jones or Bubba Free John than any of you does. I have the same sense of identity with all of you that I have with Bubba Free John." (Pg. 292)

He asserts, "But people want the Guru to be the Avatar. They want that exclusive God image, whereas God doesn't exist in the exclusive sense... Outwardly, this Community appears like any other. There is no reason why you should think it has to look extraordinary. Be ordinary, be happy. Don't worry about all that b______t. Live sadhana." (Pg. 336) He adds, "When I say my work to reveal the Teaching is complete, I mean that I will no longer serve the child or the adolescent in those who come to me. Those who would approach me must come to me through my Ashram, my Community of Devotees." (Pg. 346-347) Furthermore, "I still live in the Ashram. I come and sit in Satsang. I talk. I see people. A certain dimension of theatre of being present as an object for disciples must be maintained, at least for now. But fundamentally, my work is now of that third or perfect kind. I am waiting for devotees. And when they come I live with them in Truth." (Pg. 357)

Adi Da is somewhat of an "acquired taste," and he definitely doesn't appeal to everyone. Still, his earliest books (such as this one, "Method of the Siddhas," "The Knee of Listening," etc.) are perhaps of more interest to the average "seeker" than his later ones.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Heart Exceeds the Goddess (and the Garbage), August 26, 2013
This review is from: Garbage and the Goddess: The last miracles and final spiritual instructions of Bubba Free John (Paperback)
This is a most lively account of an enlightened, wild, free man penetrating the emotional hang-ups of his followers. Breath-takingly fresh, penetratingly honest, this book gives a glimpse into the ashram of a magnificent spiritual teacher, and one of the most controversial. After reading this book, I read the others and set upon to meet and encounter this God-Man myself, and well, my garbage and fascinations were trashed... hooray!
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