Qty:1
  • List Price: $12.95
  • Save: $1.29 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Garden, Ashes (Eastern Eu... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Garden, Ashes (Eastern European Literature Series) Paperback – October 1, 2003


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.66
$11.66 $2.42

"The Painter" by Peter Heller
After having shot a man in a Santa Fe bar, the famous artist Jim Stegner served his time and has since struggled to manage the dark impulses that sometimes overtake him. See more
$11.66 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Garden, Ashes (Eastern European Literature Series) + A Tomb for Boris Davidovich (Eastern European Literature Series) + Hourglass (European Classics)
Price for all three: $42.51

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

"Let us not mince words here: Danilo Kis's Garden, Ashes is an unmitigated masterpiece, surely not just one of the best books about the Holocaust, but one of the greatest books of the past century."--Aleksandar Hemon, from the introduction

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Serbo-Croation --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

"The Mermaid's Child" by Jo Baker
In this fantastical novel, the acclaimed author of "Longbourn" brings us the magical story of a young girl in search of her mother - who just might be a mermaid. See more

Product Details

  • Series: Eastern European Literature Series
  • Paperback: 170 pages
  • Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press; 1 edition (October 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 156478326X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1564783264
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 0.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #705,044 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 8 customer reviews
He's a masterful (sometimes experimental) writer, and this is an amazing Holocaust-inspired fiction.
Bibliophile
Frightened that Mr. Scham's Pan-like romps in the local woods are a secret cover for illicit communications with Allied bombers, the thugs plan a lynch party.
B. Berthold
Trust me, death and starvation notwithstanding, this is an exhilarating book, a paean to vivid perceptions.
Giordano Bruno

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Giordano Bruno on April 2, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The collapse of the USSR was the best thing that ever happened to American and western European opera houses. In a parallel fashion, the fall of the walls between East and West has enabled us to 'discover' a wealth of literature - some of it suppressed previously - of unexpected brilliance. Yugoslavian writer Danilo Kis (1935-1989) is a prime example.

"Garden, Ashes" is anything but a 'novel' in the usual English-literature sense. Even the most perspicacious reader will be hard pressed to assemble a plot from it, or to impose any chronology on it. The jumble of childhood memories, the syntax of dreams, the exciting confusion of an old photo album in which the pictures have fallen out of order and lost their labels -- those are the compositional rules of Garden, Ashes. Yes, it's possible to declare, on the book cover, that Kis has written a semi-autobiographical tale of his childhood in World War II Yugoslavia, with his demented father and family, and at times the child narrator reveals his age - nine, eleven - and attaches names to his people, his own being Andi Scham. Yes, the family is oddly endangered, forced to flee, afflicted with poverty and hunger. But no, this is not another Holocaust tale, or if it is, the boy Andi didn't experience it as such. For him, it was an adventure toward a heroic deed, the mastery of Death, the ability to control and indefinitely postpone Death - his own death, of course - through fantasy and fantastical redefinition of all perceptions. Don't expect to be able to articulate where the boy Andi emerged as the Author Danilo; they are simultaneous. Memory for both is the shadow of onrushing Death.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Libri Mundi on July 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
It's heaven hell and purgatory - that is the three distinct metaphorical division of the book. you will find that sometimes bad is better than good and it is better to live in dream than in reality. The grey area between dream and reality in this book is unlimited. The author talks about his father - sometimes his father is like Don Quixote and on other occasions his father is the little tyrant without the crown. It is very close to a modern day Don Quixote. The transalation by William Hannaher is great and worth reading. I will recommend reading this book
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ethan Cooper VINE VOICE on April 25, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Holocaust, in the form of quick references to ghettos, cattle cars, and death camps, is in the background of GARDEN, ASHES. But the content of this book is dominated by the perceptions and sensibilities of Andreas, a young boy whose family life is abnormal because his brilliant father slips into a pathetic madness.

In writing this story, Kis endows Andreas with "...a sick hypersensitivity" that "turned everything into a memory, too quickly: sometimes one day was enough, or an interval of a few hours, or a routine change of place, for an everyday event with a lyrical value that I did not sense at the time, to become suddenly adorned with a radiant echo..."

Meanwhile, Edward, Andreas's father, has this to say about himself. "There are people... who are born unhappy and to make other unhappy...They are titans without the power of titans, dwarf-titans whose only greatness was given them in the form of a rigid dose of sensitivity that dissolves their trifling strength...They follow their star, their sick sensibility, borne along by titanic plans and intentions, but then break like waves against the rocky banks of triviality. The height of cruelty allotted them in lucidity..."

To explore the interaction between this hypersensitive and impressionable boy and this amazing yet doomed father, Kis basically follows an ordinary developmental timeline. Here, Andreas discusses with his amazing lyricism such ordinary boyhood issues as his mother, childish sexuality, biblical stories, and the interaction of his extended family. At the same time, Andreas begins and ends his narration with his fear of death. Death, he initially hopes to outwit or outrun.
Read more ›
12 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By B. Berthold on September 2, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
To convey the magical consternation, lyrical mayhem, structural pyrotechnics, dithyrambic drunkenness of Danilo Kis` stories approaches the impossible. Few writers manage to confuse, baffle and simultaneously illuminate and enrapture their readers as does this sadly underappreciated Serbian genius of letters. While the least problematic border crossing into Danilo-land is with his excellent collection of short fiction, `Encyclopedia of the Dead,` his novel, `garden ashes,` ultimately rewards the dogged hunter of enriching literary experiences.

The story of `garden, ashes` is straightforward enough: a young boy in 1940`s Hungary recounts the ominous days before the Second World War and more precisely, the Holocaust, arrived on his family's doorstep. Andreas Scham, second child of a doting Montenegrin mother and eccentric Jewish father unravels his family narrative as gypsy-like, they ramble from hamlet to hamlet in the Serbian Hungarian borderlands in an attempt to keep one step ahead of the increasingly virulent anti-Semitic authorities of Admiral Horthy`s Hungary. Like in other Kis works (notably the `Hourglass`), the specter of the Holocaust is never directly addressed but hovers over the narrative like a vulture over carrion. Instead, `garden, ashes` is one boy's attempt to understand and eventually come to love a father as distant and terrifying as some god and as ridiculously pitiful as some circus clown. That we know where Andreas` journey will ultimately end makes the narrative all the more powerful.

Andreas Scham approaches his father with a mixture of awe and fear for Eduard Scham is one singular character.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?