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Garrincha: The Triumph & Tragedy of Brazil's Forgotten Footballing Hero Paperback – International Edition, September 27, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 420 pages
  • Publisher: Yellow Jersey Press (September 27, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0224064339
  • ISBN-13: 978-0224064330
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,961,180 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

" 'Castro's biography is funny and moving, zealously researched and lovingly told. This excellent new translation by Andrew Downie means English readers can properly appreciate one of the most incredible lives in the history of sport.' - Alex Bellos, Telegraph. 'Passionate, fascinating and surprisingly moving... a worthy tribute... According to Gazza, Gascoigne has limited interest in books. He should be persuaded to make an exception for Garrincha. He would learn more about himself than by reading his own autobiography.' - Josh Lacey, Guardian. 'A compelling page-turner, warts and all' - Scotland on Sunday. [A] powerfully atmospheric and beautifully rendered life of one of Brazil's greatest ever players... A sad and fantastic book.' - Harry Pearson, When Saturday Comes"

About the Author

RUY CASTRO has worked for many of Brazil's top newspapers and magazines. He is also the author of several biographies and collections of quotations. His most recent works include Bossa Nova: The Story of the Brazilian Music that Seduced the World and Rio de Janeiro: Carnival under Fire. He is currently working on a biography of Carmen Miranda. He lives in Rio de Janeiro.

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Customer Reviews

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The book is both funny, deeply moving and very sad all at the same time.
Craig Chad
I then went on to read Ruy Castro's next book (translated into English) Garrincha which is about a Futebol star.
S. Bennet
It also caused a great deal of trouble for his friends, relations and colleagues.
Craobh Rua

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Craobh Rua on October 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
Although some people may disagree - the entire population of Argentina, I suspect - Brazil are widely considered the top dogs of world soccer. As a nation they've won the World Cup five times and the Maracanã - where Brazil play their home games - is one of the sport's most famous stadiums. Any discussion about the soccer's greatest players will feature several Brazilians - Pelé, Jairzinho, Zico, Romário, Bebeto, Falcão, Sócrates and Ronaldinho would surely be in contention. Manuel Francisco dos Santos, most commonly known as "Garrincha", may not be as widely known as his countrymen but he fully deserves to be included on that list. He is, however, quite clearly honoured in his home country where he is still known as the "Joy of the People".

Garrincha was born in 1933 in a small town called Pau Grande. Amazingly, for such a gifted sportsman, he was born with 'bent' legs - his left bent out and his right bent in. When young, he was also smaller than the kids his own age and was christened 'garrincha' (the local name for a 'little bird') by his sister. His hometown was founded by the English in the 1870s and was centred around the América Fabril factory - the factory, it seems, practically employed the town's entire population. The town's soccer club - Sport Club Pau Grande - was founded in 1908 and, although an amateur team, was the first senior club Garrincha played for. He eventually moved to Botafogo, one of Rio's professional teams - it was here he played his best football, and he won the Carioca (Rio's State Championship) several times. He played for Brazil 60 times, winning the World Cup twice; he dismantled and demoralised the highly-rated USSR team in the 1958 Finals and, some say, won the tournament nearly single-handedly in 1962.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S. Bennet on January 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
I first read Ruy Castro's 'Bossa Nova' and wanted more! Then I found his book 'Rio de Janeiro', and loved it. I then went on to read Ruy Castro's next book (translated into English) Garrincha which is about a Futebol star. I am not into soccer but I loved the book.
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By Ian on March 25, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book in about 3 nights...couldn't put it down, well researched and written, tells the tragic story on and off the field of Mane Garrincha...what a talent...go check on youtube some of his games, they have full 1958 and 1962 World Cup complete games. Well worth your time, this Brazil team was out of this world.
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By TAMAL on September 18, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very good book. Written in a racy style. very interesting. got to tell my friends about it. Wiating for more.
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By Marco Antonio Costa on January 19, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
A great book about a controversial sport celebrity of middle 20th century;

I'll never understand why the English edition simply did not translate literally the original title in Portuguese "Lone Star."
Much more flashy... especially to the general public, not particularly fond of football. After all, more than the story of a (almost now-forgotten) great footballer, is a unique story about the stunning Rise and melancholic Fall of a celebrity (of sports) in the early days of television, fueled by alcohol (drug), sex and music... Sounds familiar?

Now, remembering the death's date of Garrincha (january 20), I say that I'll never understand how some people (and they are not few, including some footballers) think that, the stars of a time when the games were filmed in black & white, with no stratospheric salaries, pockmarked lawns, poorly lit stadiums, primitive and inefficient doping, sports medicine idem (see the infiltrations then made ​​in the knees of athletes), are 'less' talented than those from the age of color TV, 'carpeted' lawns (at least the major European ones) , well lit arenas etc etc
For me it's the same thing as saying that Sidney Sheldon would be a "better" writer than Shakespeare, simply because he uses computer, or that Genghis Khan was a lesser military genius compared with any famous 20th century general, simply because his troops were to use horse archery... No sense at all.
Not to mention the staff who avoids opine about "old" footballers for not having seen them in action, alive... "Oh, I don't know if Isaac Newton was all that as a scientist, after all I have not seen him in action with my own eyes" (sic)
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