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Gasoline Alley

4.6 out of 5 stars 54 customer reviews

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Audio CD, September 15, 1988
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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Rod Stewart has become such a clown prince of rock & roll that it's sometimes hard to remember that at one point in his career he was making some of the best music on the planet. Gasoline Alley, Stewart's second solo album and his first after joining the Faces, was but one of four brief, brilliant records he issued in the early 1970s. All of its sure-handed tracks, the ballads and the burners, still sparkle and crackle today--especially the gorgeous autobiographical title track and his definitive takes of Elton John's "Country Comforts" and Bob Dylan's "Only a Hobo." Stewart's magic rasp invests every word with passion, making even a simple rockabilly chestnut like "Cut Across Shorty" into a lover's anthem. Great, great stuff. --Michael Ruby

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Rod Stewart has become such a clown prince of rock & roll that it's sometimes hard to remember that at one point in his career he was making some of the best music on the planet. Gasoline Alley, Stewart's second solo album and his first after joining the Faces, was but one of four brief, brilliant records he issued in the early 1970s. All of its sure-handed tracks, the ballads and the burners, still sparkle and crackle today--especially the gorgeous autobiographical title track and his definitive takes of Elton John's "Country Comforts" and Bob Dylan's "Only a Hobo." Stewart's magic rasp invests every word with passion, making even a simple rockabilly chestnut like "Cut Across Shorty" into a lover's anthem. Great, great stuff. --Michael Ruby
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (September 15, 1988)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Polygram
  • ASIN: B000001FD0
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #482,113 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Back in the early seventies, when Rod Stewart had not yet abandoned his own artistic path in order to become a spiky-haired, glitzy pop singer in pink outfits, he wrote some of the best folk rock songs, turned out some of the best cover tunes, and worked with one of the best backing band ever.

If you prefer the Rod Stewart of the 1980s, "Blondes Have More Fun" and all, this might not be your thing. Teenagers will generally look bewildered if you play them this kind of music, and look at you like you're from another planet if you profess to enjoy it.
But never mind them, what do kids know?! To me, the four primarily acoustic albums that Rod the Mod turned out between 1969 and 1970-something, remain the best items in his entire catalogue. Tough, organic folk, gritty blues, swaggering rock, and melodic country blended together and stirred with a drumstick...and, to me, "Gasoline Alley" is the best of the lot, alongside "Every Picture Tells a Story".

"Gasoline Alley" (the sublime title track is written by Rod and Ronnie Wood) sports perhaps the best Bob Dylan cover of all time, a beautiful "Only A Hobo", as well as a hoarse, ragged, folkish version of Elton John's and Bernie Taupin's "Country Comforts", Stewarts own "Lady Day", and an incredibly rocking, reeling "Cut Across Shorty", all guitars, drums and a lone violin. It ought to be hokey, but it's not!

I can't remember who it was that wrote something like this about this album:
"-Instead of looking for the rock within the folk, [Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood] proved that folk could rock like hell on its own!" But it's damn right, and that's why I'm blatantly stealing the quote here. This isn't really a rock n' roll record in the traditional sense, but does it ever rock and roll!
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Format: Audio CD
Believe it or not, at one time Rod Stewart was one of us. A quick glance at the songwriting credits for this, Stewart's second 'solo' effort, reveal where Rod's head was at: covers of Bobby & Shirley Womack's 'It's All Over Now' (more famously, and somewhat more enjoyably covered by The Rolling Stones), Bob Dylan's 'Only a Hobo', Elton John and Bernie Taupin's 'Country Comforts', and Steve Marriott & Ronnie Lane's 'My Way of Giving'. I've tried to keep my record collection pure of disco, and with composers such as these I don't believe anyone can accuse me of harboring anything as defiling as 'Hot Legs' or 'Do Ya' Think I'm Sexy?'. Unfortunately for me, each time I hear Rod's voice, a bit of the 'Hot Legs' overplay corrupts my capacity to concentrate on his earlier (and better) sensibilities. Rod's raspy vocal cords made him one of rock's premier vocalists before career decisions became of more immediate concern than the art. His defection to 'the other side' was perhaps the most disconcerting loss of the era.

Nevertheless, from his debut 'Rod Stewart Album' through his epic 'Every Picture Tells a Story' and it's sequel, 'Never a Dull Moment', Stewart left behind a fine legacy. 'Gasoline Alley' is Rod's second 'solo' effort, and while it failed to spawn even one single, it is a consistantly fine production. In fact, since it generated absolutely no Top 40 attention, the songs on this disc have managed to escaped the dred overplay that has afflicted some Stewart numbers, most notably 'Maggie May', and even 'You Wear It Well'.
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Format: Audio CD
It brings tears to my eyes every time I listen to (hear is a better term) anything rod has recorded in the past twenty years. Tears of sorrow, sadness and loss. How could a man who could make a record as good as this one become what he is today. This is such a fine recording. His unusual mix of acoustic and electric, mandolins and violins never loses its ability to evoke joy and pleasure.
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Format: Audio CD
Rod Stewart upped the ante on his second album, Gasoline Alley. He took the basic folk sound of acoustic guitars and juiced it up by adding mandolins and electric instruments to create an unique sound. The album doesn't contain any hit singles, but many of the songs have become staples in Rod Stewart's repertoire. Songs like the title track, "Cut Across Shorty", "Lady Day" and "Jo's Lament" are filled with vivid lyrics and Mr. Stewart sing them in that signature whiskey-soaked voice. He does fine covers of Bobby Womack's, by way of The Rolling Stones, "It's All Over Now", Bob Dylan's "Only A Hobo" and Elton John's "Country Comforts".
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Format: Audio CD
Gasoline Alley is one of Rod Stewarts very best albums of all time. on this album he brought in mandolins, and electric guitars, and made one hell of a rock and roll album!
The album starts off with the title track and one of Rods very best songs. then we kick into one of Rods best cover songs, 'Its All Over Now' then on to another classic cover, and maybe better then the original, 'Only a Hobo' is one of Bob Dylans best songs, and Rod took and made it his own. 'My Way Of Giving' is a great bluesy rocker. 'Country Comforts' is an amazing cover of classic Elton John song, its truly one of the best cover songs ever coverd! 'Cut Across Shotry' a Stewart original is a classic among classics, its rock and roll at its British best! 'Lady Day is another classic Rod Stewart song that is never talked about. you'll love it when you here trust me. 'Jo's Lament' is a great song that no one ever talks about and I dont know why I think its one of the better songs on the album personaly. 'Your My Girl (I Dont Want To Discuss It) is one of Rods biggest songs off the album, and while its good its kinda overrated.
Gasoline Alley is one of Rad Stewarts best albums, and songs, but it is also one of the best albums of all time, so dont miss out in this classic.
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