Gaspipe and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.34
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by hippo_books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Item qualifies for FREE shipping and Prime! This item is used.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss Hardcover – July 1, 2008


See all 14 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$3.94 $0.01
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow; First Edition edition (July 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061429848
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061429842
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (71 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #718,256 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Anthony “Gaspipe” Casso was the boss of New York’s Lucchese Mafia family. He worked himself to the top as a cold-blooded killer, responsible for more than 50 murders. He was also, for a while, the next-door neighbor of the author. Carlo’s sister babysat for Casso; his mother was best friends with Casso’s wife. That long and trusting relationship garnered Carlo, journalist and best-selling author (The Ice Man, 2006), unprecedented access to one of the most ruthless crime bosses in the history of the American Mob. Carlo portrays a man who is tender and loyal to his family but who ruthlessly killed or ordered the killing of scores of people, many of whom were former friends. Casso, who earned a handsome living selling drugs, robbing banks, and trafficking in stolen goods, became the reluctant leader of the Lucchese family as prosecutors moved in on the Mob bosses. When he, too, was finally captured, he eventually joined the ranks of the hated “rats” and gave prosecutors an earful, including the Mob’s decision to hit John Gotti after he ordered an unapproved hit on Big Paul Castellano; how the Mafia controlled the unions; the truth behind the assassination of the Kennedys; and who killed Jimmy Hoffa. Readers interested in the inner workings of the Mafia will love this chilling look at a Mob boss. --Vanessa Bush

Review

“And if your Sopranos addiction shows no signs of abating, check out Philip Carlo’s GASPIPE.” (Los Angeles Times)

“This powerful story is required reading for anyone with a yen for the Mafia, the criminal underworld and a law enforcement system struggling to keep up.” (Publishers Weekly)

PRAISE FOR GASPIPE “Carlo has the real goods. …the inside information about the lifestyle, rituals, killings and betrayals is priceless. An authoritative look at a once-rampant predator now at bay.” (Kirkus Reviews)

PRAISE FOR THE NIGHT STALKER“Carlo has given us an astonishing portrait of a killer not seen since In Cold Blood.” (Denis Hamill, New York Daily News)

“We’ve all read novelists and true crime writers who try to put you inside-the-mind-of-the-serial-killer, but I can’t remember one that succeeded with the physical and psychological intimacy of this collaboration between the writer and the killer himself.” (New York Press)

“An exceptionally well-told true crime tale.” (Publishers Weekly)

“Phil Carlo paints a disturbing portrait of cold-blooded killer, Richard Ramirez. In the true crime tradition of In Cold Blood and The Executioner’s Song, Carlo compellingly tells the ghastly story from numerous points of view, including those of Ramirez and two ingenious sheriff’s detectives who finally cracked the case.” (People)

“…This book will provide true crime readers chilling inside perspective of a serial killer.” (Library Journal)

“I stayed up until 3:00 a.m. because I couldn’t put the book down. Quite a compelling read. The amount of details is truly amazing.” (San Jose Mercury News)

“I couldn’t put the book down. The details are amazing, told from many points of view; very scary indeed.” (Los Angeles Times)

“Absorbing…detailed, Phil Carlo allows the killer’s grotesque acts to be squarely view.” (Los Angeles Times Book Review)

“Carlo’s book is a chilling, painstakingly researched account of the summer that kept residents of the San Gabriel Valley and later the entire state, captive behind closed doors and windows in fear. I read the book twice I was so taken by it.” (Northridge Chronicle)

“Carlo’s book is filled with never-known-before details. He did his homework and wrote a very compelling true crime tale.” (CNN)

“A fine entry in the burgeoning field of works tracing the decline of the traditional organized crime families and their once impenetrable structures.” (Booklist)

“Carlo tells this amazing story like a novel, with its dramatic ending when a hard-working, lowly police detective eventually got on Kuklinski’s trail and hunted the hunter like a real-life version of The Fugitive. A chilling look at the creation of a psychopath.” (Toronto Sun)

“... the inside information about the lifestyle, rituals, killings and betrayals is priceless.An authoritative look at a once-rampant predator now at bay.” (Kirkus Reviews)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

The book really seems longer than it needs to be.
J. K. Luckenbach
I found a few factual errors that made it seem amateurish and lazy although his editor might have more to do with that than Mr. Carlo.
M. Perez
I read FIVE FAMILIES and what Carlo garnered from Casso is far more detailed, far more in-depth.
LG

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By MikeMc on August 8, 2008
Format: Hardcover
While overall I enjoyed "Gaspipe" I was nagged but the author's attempts to portray such a merciless killer in a sympathetic light. I've no doubt that Carlo's sympathetic tone stems from his personal ties to Casso (the author's parents were friends of Casso and his wife)but the author's lack of objectivity made me question whether what I was reading was accurate or just Casso's spin on the events in the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Bill Emblom on July 9, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Author Philip Carlo was a neighbor of mafia boss Anthony Casso growing up in Brooklyn, and perhaps Casso felt more open to speaking to someone he felt more comfortable. I like the short chapters, although some are ridiculously short. One paragraph! I find it hard to be sympathetic to mafia boss Casso who claims "to be a better man than most of the people on the streets these days." This coming from a man who ordered hits on others due to mere paranoia on his part. He also engineered the torture killing (I won't go into details here) of an individual who tried to do to him what he (Casso) had done to many others. Anthony Casso laments there is no loyalty within the mob. This is true despite their comedic ritual of Omerta where one is required to hold a burning piece of paper while blistering the hands until the fire goes out. Certainly there is no rest for the wicked. Living a ridiculously outrageous lifestyle with ill-gotten gains, and living in fear of what another may implicate you for leads one to plot the others demise. I did find a contradiction in this book with author Philip Carlo's book The Ice Man. On page 280 of The Ice Man author Carlo states Richard Kuklinski placed five bullets into mobster Roy DeMeo and killed him. On page 129 of Gaspipe author Carlo states the Testa brothers, Joey and Patty, along with Anthony Casso killed him. Patty poured Roy coffee while Joey and Anthony shot Roy to death. Are there other contradictions in the book? Probably! I was also bothered by some of the sentence structure which was confusing. One sentence in particular on page 200 I found puzzling was in regard to Vinnie Albano. Casso emptied his gun into Albano's chest. "Albano was dead before he knew it." Casso laments the government reneged on its so-called deal if he testified against mobsters, but I find it hard to sympathize with him. There is always forgiveness, but like other mobsters, their life ends with either an early grave or a prison sentence.
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
40 of 50 people found the following review helpful By R.J. Rios on August 14, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I have been an avid reader of true crime and mafia related books for over 15 years and have a personal library of over 300 books relating to American, Canadian and Italian mafia history and if there is one thing I am certain of is that unless so called facts are substantiated and reinforced or backed by solid research and hard evidence, you cannot believe everything your read! For the better part of 5 decades, mainly since the Senate Committee Hearings on Organized Crime of the 1950s and 60s there have been countless books written about mafia crime families, La Cosa Nostra leaders and members, and the events that surround their lives and the history of the American mafia, but most of the early books written by investigative reporters, journalists and independent authors were based strictly on willing participants within various local and federal law enforcement agencies and on their records, along with court records and media (mostly newspaper) accounts. Basically, it was not until the 1980s that authors of mob related books obtained the ability to research their subjects (groups, individuals and events) through the best means available for roughly more than 25 years, allowing for more accurate and credible accounts and sources. Those accounts and sources would be law enforcement bugs and wiretaps, along with surveillance records and photos and of course, mob informers, a.k.a., the "rats", "stoolies" and "co-operating witnesses" who end up in the witness protection program or in prison doing a short stint for co-operating or serious time otherwise.

What must be remembered even now is that all those organized crime members who co-operate in some manner with law enforcement are criminals!
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By M. Perez on February 20, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I must admit I waited anxiously for Mr. Carlo's book, on one of Organize Crime history most intriguing characters Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso. Although I've not read any of Mr. Carlo's previous undertakings such as "The Night Stalker" and "The Iceman", I felt based on his New York City background that he would hit the mark. However I found the book to fall very short of my anticipatory exuberance.

I found a few factual errors that made it seem amateurish and lazy although his editor might have more to do with that than Mr. Carlo. But even something as basic as when Joe Valachi testified in front of congress he couldn't get that right. A high school student doing basic fact checking would have found that one. In October 1963, Valachi (a "soldier" in New York City's powerful Genovese Crime Family, whose primary "job" within the family was that of a driver) had testified before Arkansas Senator John L. McClellan's congressional committee on organized crime that the Mafia did exist. Mr. Carlo puts in his book this happened in 1952. This alone throws doubt and lack of credibility into anything else he has to write.

Mr. Carlo again doing no fact checking adds a couple of thousand more members to the ranks of the Gambino Crime Family. He goes on to attribute the nickname "Quack, Quack" to Angelo Ruggiero a close member of the Gotti inner circle by writing that this individual was known for "ducking" subpoenas. When in fact he was known as "Quack, Quack" because of his constant talking, so much so that the FBI recorded hundreds of hours of telephone conversations in which he openly conducted criminal activities without ever thinking of the consequences that might bring.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?