Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Gates of Shabbat: Shaarei Shabbat: A Guide for Observing Shabbat Paperback – September 25, 1991


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.17 $0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 148 pages
  • Publisher: CCAR Press (September 25, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0881230103
  • ISBN-13: 978-0881230109
  • Product Dimensions: 9.9 x 6.9 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #90,906 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

55 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Rabbi Yonassan Gershom VINE VOICE on August 9, 1999
Format: Paperback
As an Orthodox Jew, I naturally have certain reservations about recommending a Reform book, especially one that says you can just sort of make up your own level of Shabbat observance as you go along. I guess you would have to call me the "traditionalist" among the smorgasbord of pick-and-choose choices the authors offer for how Reform Jews observe Shabbat.
Now, having said that, I think the book can still be a useable gate for the absolute beginner, coming from a secular or Reform background, who is trying to bring Shabbat observance into the home. It does have good "how-to" instructions for the home rituals, non-sexist translations, and clear transliterations of the Hebrew text. I was pleasantly surprised to see that the how-tos for the rituals are very traditional, reflecting, perhaps, the recent movement within Reform to introduce more Hebrew into the service and more observance into the home.
Plus it has the written music for the blessings and songs around the table, and there are nice explanations of some of the "whys" for the traditions, such as why we have two candles, etc.
All of which makes it an appealing reference for the non-Orthodox Jew who is trying to explore Shabbat but does not want anything "too heavy." I especially liked the relaxed, user-friendly writing style. (My Orthodox brethren could learn a lesson here, because, sad to say, many Orthodox book in English are just too academic and formal, making them inaccessible to the rank beginner.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
I bought this book because I felt that I was not learning enough about Shabbat in my conversion class. It is an excellent book for people converting or who want to know more about the Sabbath as Jews observe it. There is Hebrew, English and transliteration for the prayers. There are wonderful stories, there are explanations to the how and why of many things done on shabbat. The book has songs in transliterated Hebrew and at the end of most of them it tells you what you are actually singing about for those who don't fully comprehend Hebrew. It helped to make services more meaningful for me because now I actually know what I am sininging about. There is also a companion tape of music put out by the Reform movemnet for this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By kaiser@physiology.pnb.sunysb.edu on May 23, 1999
Format: Paperback
The present publication is a guide to observing Shabbat (the Jewish Sabbath) from the point of view of Reform Judaism. From the standard Reform point of view - which is not really bound to Jewish law - this book may seem somewhat "right-wing". It actually says that Reform Jews should follow Shabbt, including a number of the traditional laws and customs! Its presentation of a number of such laws and customs is well done.
As a starting guide, this is an Ok book. However, Reform Judaism is supposed to be about choice, and it seems to me that no one really has a choice if they don't know what all the options are. What are all the customs and laws regarding Shabbat, and how did they develop? What purpose do they serve? Why do people do them? Unless you comprehensivle look into these questions, you deny yourself the ability to make an informed choice.
As such, I would also reccomend reading the chapters on Shabbat in in Issac Klein's "A Guide to Jewish Religous Practice" and Michael Strassfeld's "The First Jewish Catalog".
Another book I would reccomend is "The Shabbat Seder" by Ron Wolfson. It is a step-by-step guide teaching the meaning and practices of the Sabbath, and has an easy-to-read format for people with varying degrees of Hebrew skills, with most blessings written in both Hebrew and English, and transliteration. On a more technical level, one might want to read through "The Sabbath: A Guide to Its Understanding and Observance, by Dr. I. Grunfeld.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By John S. Ryan on December 21, 1999
Format: Paperback
Rabbi Yonassan Gershom has hit the nail on the head: this book is a helpful introduction for the absolute beginner, but from a Traditional point of view, it's "Shabbos Lite."
My suggestion? Use the book as an introductory guide -- and then, if you want to learn more about Shabbat observance (and incidentally rid yourself of some silly prejudices at the same time), make friends with some Traditionally observant Jews and spend an occasional Shabbat with them.
It's a mitzvah for you, it's a mitzvah for them, everybody's happy. And fostering Ahavat Yisrael in this way is very much in the spirit of Shabbat.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?