Customer Reviews


34 Reviews
5 star:
 (21)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


45 of 55 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Intimate Look at the Soldiers of a Great Army
Joseph Glathaar's "General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse" is not the kind of Civil War book I ordinarily buy -- my shelves hold relatively few Confederate-specific titles. By geography and ancestry my fundamental orientation is pro-Union (several members of my family served in various Union Army regiments, none in Confederate units) and a part of me must view the...
Published on April 2, 2008 by Bruce Trinque

versus
30 of 43 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very Disappointed!
I very much want to like this book and keep trying to find good things to say about it. The author's book "Forged in Battle", in my estimation, is one of the most important Civil War books of our time. Forged, which I reviewed at five stars, is instrumental in renewing study of the USCT and is a landmark event in the modern study of the war's history. We have some...
Published on April 17, 2008 by James W. Durney


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

45 of 55 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Intimate Look at the Soldiers of a Great Army, April 2, 2008
By 
Bruce Trinque (Amston, CT United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse (Hardcover)
Joseph Glathaar's "General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse" is not the kind of Civil War book I ordinarily buy -- my shelves hold relatively few Confederate-specific titles. By geography and ancestry my fundamental orientation is pro-Union (several members of my family served in various Union Army regiments, none in Confederate units) and a part of me must view the Confederate Army as "the enemy". But what I saw of Glatthaar's new volume on the bookstore shelves persuaded me to buy it. It is in part a narrative history of the campaigns and battles of the Army of Northern Virginia (I suppose I would say that this forms the skeleton upon which to hang the main narrative), but is much more a "socioeconomic" look at the common soldiers (and common field officers) of the ANV, especially how their attitudes and morale evolved over the course of the war. Glatthaar bases his study in part upon a statistical analysis of many soldiers in the ANV, but the main thrust of the book is firmly based on good-old history drawn from innumerable primary sources, and it provides an excellent look at the men who served for so long in a terrible struggle. I found it worthwhile reading, even for a dyed-in-the-wool-uniform New England Yankee.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not a Book about Battles, May 26, 2008
By 
Robert C. Olson (Vacaville, California USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse (Hardcover)
Not a Book about Battles
Dr Joseph T. Glatthaar's General Lee's Army is NOT a book about battles, although it does an adequate job of summarizing the basics of General Lee's major engagements. Rather, it is an in-depth socio-economic study of General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia: What it was, who the personnel were, what they did, and how the army basically functioned. There was more, so much more, to Lee's grand army than just fighting. What was the real morale like? How and what did the soldiers eat and do when not fighting or on "the march"? What happened in camp during those long periods of inactivity? In essence, how did the army function when it was not engaged in combat, and when it was fighting how did the front line soldiers react? Much has been written about civil war combat, strategies, and tactics, but little has been written about the mundane non-combat life of a civil war army. Dr Glatthaar does a superb job of analyzing, investigating, and documenting (over 108 pages of Notes and Bibliography) the everyday workings of Lee grand Army of Northern Virginia.
Not a book if you are looking for the taste and feel of battle. But an excellent source for the "rest of the story" of Civil War army life. Dr. Glatthaar's writing style is easy and flows with an interesting chronological time line. He subtly points out how General Lee's army changed as the war progressed and more of the veteran leaders and soldiers were killed or become incapacitated. He highlights through personal quotes how many of the problems associated with any army also plagued Lee's Army. Not everything was chivalrous and honor. Thievery, desertion, skulking, straggling, lying, quibbling, cowardice, drunkenness, etc., all plagued General Lee's heroic army. The most interesting aspect of this book is how General Lee handled these problems.
One of the highlights of Dr Glatthaar's book is his extensive use of personal quotes from the various participants: From generals to privates. This gives the reader a feel for how these men, and women, really thought and felt about the intense times they were living in. Many times not flattering about General Lee or his army, but then, that is the way of a soldier's life.

Highly recommended for a more in-depth analysis of how a Civil War army functioned on a daily basis. Again, NOT a book about battles, strategies, or tactics, but rather a look at the more mundane daily life of a soldier in the Army of Northern Virginia.

*My only real fault about this excellent book is: It would have been nice if Dr. Glatthaar had incorporated some of his many overwhelming facts in a few more appendices in tabulated form. That way the reader could get a better feel for it all.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars General Lee's Army From Victory To Collapse, January 29, 2011
"General Lee's Army From Victory To Collapse" by Joseph Glatthaar is an interesting look at the famous Army of Northern Virginia commanded by one of America's greatest generals - Robert E. Lee.

Among the topics covered include:

1. Various military campaigns - Seven Days, 2nd Manassas, Fredericksburg, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, etc.
2. The reason soldiers enlisted.
3. Religious background of officers and soldiers.
4. Discipline in the army.
5. Relationships between the general officers.
6. Camp and recreation life between campaigns.
7. The issue of blacks and slavery.
8. Medical care.

While I was a bit hesitant at first reading the book (not all, but many college professors tend to be very liberal in their beliefs - I may get some heat for that comment!), I thought Glatthaar was pretty fair in his assessment and description of Lee's army.

The narrative was smooth and did not get bogged down into dry details. The author included several anecdotes of officers and enlisted men that kept my interest high.

Read, enjoy, and learn more about one of America's most famous armies.

Recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE WAY THEY WERE ............. FROM THEIR OWN VOICES IN LETTERS, May 8, 2008
This review is from: General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse (Hardcover)
I am not what you would call a Civil War buff or expert of that war, yet I do have many volumes on that conflict in my home library, with several of my ancestors fighting for and perishing in the conflict for the Union. A few years ago I felt a volume on Lee's retreat from Gettysburg was needed, and a book from the University of North Carolina soon appeared that did deal with that very subject. Many times I've thought a book was also needed on the mainstay of the Confederacy, the Army of Northern Virginia. and now this volume appears. This new book is both well overdue and well done.

Sometimes when doing a review it seems I have read a different book than many other reviewers doing reviews on that book. Sadly, I get that same feeling here. In the author's own words he has been crafting this book since the late 1980s, and much of the book is based on the participant's own words from their own letters. How anyone can quibble with what these men wrote is beyond my understanding. And in reading these letters, many of the writers did not live beyond the war, so one just must accept what they wrote, felt, saw, and how they prioritized their last months. Many saw state's rights as #1, others saw northern invasion as #1, while others mention slavery as #1. Doesn't really matter, does it, all of these items forged them into what became the Army of Northern Virginia. And early on, one fact the author mentions, is the affect of the home on the battlefront and conversely how the battlefront affected the home. As a newly formed nation, they knew their future depended on supporting one another if there was to be any chance of a successful outcome.

Don't be mislead by the fact of my living in Virginia: I was born and raised in Ohio, and except for my own years of military service, I never really left the state of Ohio for 50+ years. Yet in retirement for various reasons, I have chosen to reside permanently in Virginia.

These letters, facts, and expressed opinions as laid out in this book are not only interesting in many ways to me but they also confound me in some ways. My views, since I remain a northerner or a "Yankee" down here, would certainly not entirely match the views of many Virginia friends, but a book such as this is needed if for no other reason than to show exactly what those Virginians of the war period thought and felt. What drove them to defy a country many of their grandparents had helped to fashion and build. They were very much aware they were in process of destroying what earlier Virginians felt worth building.

Also the Virginia of 2008 in many ways is not the Virginia of the 1861-1865 period, so in a wonderful way the book also puts the contemporary reader in touch with what it meant to be a Virginian back then. Back then Virginia was a commonwealth as it is yet today, and back then Virginians also felt themselves equally blessed and special, as most of that holds true even today.

This book makes interesting reading while offering many facts previously unknown to me, also offering facts I must digest and ponder whether I willingly want to believe in them or not. Though I live in Virginia as an ex-Ohioian I cannot express how many wonderful people I have met here and the feeling too that I myself am now blessed by living in this great state of Virginia. It is almost as if there is something in the land and air, and as I write, this is yet a wonderfully patriotic and faith based state.

Praise this book or curse it, but unless you read it without bias, you will never truly know what it was like to be and feel as a Virginian was and felt in the war years of 1861-1865. And once General Lee's army was through and done with, so too was not only Virginia, but the entire Confederacy as well. When one talks about the Army of Northern Virginia one is speaking, whether realized or not, of the heart of the Confederacy as well. And that heart stopped beating when the Army of Northern Virginia died.

Semper Fi.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Important Work -- But Not Without Problems, January 4, 2009
This review is from: General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse (Hardcover)
I purchased this book due to the reviews of McPherson and Gallagher, two eminent historians whose work I have found outstanding in the past. Any book they tout will most likely end up in my library.

However, author Glatthaar attempts too much in this single volume, and he leaves too much out (probably in the interest of space or at his editor's urging to make the book cost less and sell) that is necessary to support his analysis. In addition, there are too many sweeping statements on very complex issues that that are open to attack both on factual accuracy and interpretation. The author bases a great deal of his narrative on contemporary letters, reports and other communications by Lee and the officers and soldiers in his army. As always, these letters generally run true with respect to the writer's opinion (and morale) at the time, but are often incorrect on a factual basis. As such, they must be examined skeptically and critically. Frankly, I thought the author placed excessive reliance on such correspondence.

The primary criticism I have is the author's statistical methodology in determining the socio-economic composition of the Army of Northern Virginia. From what the author presented, it was impossible to determine the accuracy of his findings. He also missed counting previous WIAs for KIWa, and evidently put in no factor for Lee's orders to count only serious wounds. For example, John B. Gordon was wounded five times at Sharpsburg, but the author counts that as only once. Also a soldier could have been wounded several times in multiple battles before being killed later and his woundings would not have been counted at all. In addition, the author apparently threw away any random selections of soldiers if he was unable to obtain census data and tax information on them to see what their economic and slave-holding status was. Deselecting from a statistical sample invalidates the sample, casting all of the author's conclusions into doubt.

A curious example of a conclusion looking for supporting evidence was what the author said on page 466, "Southern culture brought with it a baggage that Lee never seemed to combat effectively. Confederates came from a society that encouraged independence and independent mindedness. They did not take orders or discipline well and often did what they wanted, not what their officers directed." Gee, sounds like what Washington said about his troops, also von Steuben and many others. In short, it sounds very American. Yet, these men defeated German-born Federal troops who readily took orders and exhibited a high degree of discipline. What the author is talking about is the Scotch-Irish spirit of independence that saw its last hurrah in the Civil War through a decimation of the Scotch-Irish on both sides. Lee stated that the Scotch-Irish made the best soldiers in his command, in particular as commanded by Scotch-Irishman Stonewall Jackson.

At any rate, it is difficult to rate the Army of Northern Virginia low on discipline when it was so extraordinarily effective in battle -- indeed, it can be (and has been) argued that Lee's army was the most effective army in American history. One needs to look at why it was so effective rather than at why it was not MORE effective. Part of its effectiveness was because of the practice of recruiting companies from single locales, then forming regiments from contigious areas, and putting those regiments into brigades where everyone came from the same state. Confederate authorities were seeking unit cohesion and effectiveness in battle -- a concept eliminated in the American Army by World War II in favor of scattering recruits among many units to lessen the chance of high casualties accruing to a single electoral district. (The result is, of course, higher overall casualties.) Commonality breeds unit cohesion and effectiveness -- diversity brings contention, strife, a lack of cohesion, and much higher casulties.

All that being said, this book is extremely valuable for what it brings to the table and its contributions to understanding Lee's army, its men, and the problems it had with civilian support, supply (in food, ammunition, clothing, etc), and morale. I know of no single volume that discusses these aspects better or more thoroughly. One can overlook many of the mistakes and problems in this work as a result. For example, the author says that only "7,892 infantrymen and a couple of thousand artillery and cavalry kept up with the army" (to surrender at Appomattox.) He neglects to mention that the army was strung out in its desperate flight to waiting supplies, and implies that Confederates (not in the Army of Northern Virginia) poured in to Appromattox afterwards to swell the numbers granted paroles in the three following days. No mention is made of Fitz Lee and his cavalrymen who refused to surrender and rode off to fight again.

At any rate, I do not wish to be overly critical. This is a very fine work, and the author is to be commended. I recommend that every serious student of the Civil War purchase and read this book. There is much to learn here, but a firm grounding in Lee's campaigns is probably a prerequisite. Experts such as Krick, Gallagher and McPherson will easily read past the problems and sift out a great deal of wheat, but I wonder if the casual reader has that ability. In short, this is an expert's book, not one for the casual reader to read and accept as gospel.

For another work that might add to the reader's study of the Civil War armies and their environment, I recommend the collection of essays in "The Wilderness Campaign" edited by Gary Gallagher. On morale and other factors, I recommend James McPherson's "Why They Fought." For the basic works on Lee and his generals, I recommend "R. E. Lee, A Biography (4 vols) by Douglas Southhall Freeman and "Lee's Lieutenants" (3 vols) by the same author. For those with the financial wherewithall, I recommend the basic work on all Civil War battles, the "OR (War of the Rebellion -- Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies)" and the supplement "Southern Historical Society Papers" both available together for $2,500.00 (182 volumes.)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Good Read | Sympathetic to Southern Cause, June 1, 2013
Joseph Glatthaar has written an interesting history of The Army of Northern Virginia, or Lee's Army. The book is well written and easy to read. There is a great deal of information and interesting detail in the book. The book seems to be written with some sympathy for Lee and the Southern cause generally, so if you find such sympathy annoying then you might want to read a different history. The lost cause of the South comes into full view as the book works its way to the point that the South considers using slaves in the military. A war started to defend the idea that whites should be allowed to own blacks slaves eventually falls upon it own efforts as it becomes clear that black slaves must be turned into soldiers just like whites in the effort to win the war. Of course, the effort fails and very few slaves are turned into soldiers. The details of the decline and fall of the army are well documents and compelling.
It is a great book. Get a copy today and enjoy.

Timothy E. Kennelly
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars They achieved so much with so little, February 26, 2013
By 
P. Mascorro (Santa Rosa, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
If a person wishes to achieve a greater understanding of Lee's army, especially what led them to fight a larger and better equipped force, than this is the book they should read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent read!, September 20, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This book, despite the knowledge that it doesn't describe a lot of the battles in vivid detail about what General Lee's army went through in the civil war, puts a face on every Confederate soldier and many of the things that they had went through in their campaigns and between campaigns. It describes the problems of desertion on the units, including food shortages, and how many of them were trained, so it makes up for the fact that the battles aren't really involved in this book. But once you read the book, it is very hard to put down until you reach the end. An excellent book, by all standards!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


30 of 43 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very Disappointed!, April 17, 2008
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse (Hardcover)
I very much want to like this book and keep trying to find good things to say about it. The author's book "Forged in Battle", in my estimation, is one of the most important Civil War books of our time. Forged, which I reviewed at five stars, is instrumental in renewing study of the USCT and is a landmark event in the modern study of the war's history. We have some excellent one-volume army studies in the last few years. Steven E. Woodworth's "Nothing but Victory" and "Days of Glory" by Larry J. Daniel is similar in size to this book. Both of them cover one Civil War army in detail. I am not suggesting that these books are the "last word" on how an army history should be done but will say that they provide an idea of what works.
"General Lee's Army" is a very ambitious book, attempting to be all things at once. There is a military history section, an in-depth statistical analysis, a physiological portrait of the men and chapters on supply, high command, civilian interaction and a multitude of other subjects. The author tries to bundle all of this into a coherent story of an army at war. The presentation of military history is in chorological order, each campaign season being a major chapter. The majority of the in-depth statistical analysis is in an extended introduction prior to the military history. However, the physiological portraits, chapters on supply, civilian interaction and slavery are interspersed throughout the book. Each of these chapters is a complete history of the subject. Readers are required to shift back from 1865 at the end of these chapters when we return to the military history. This leads to some "What year is it?" problems, a minor problem in a better book but considering the other failings it is worth mentioning.
The Army of Northern Virginia had a number of serious "Human Resources" problems, the removal of D.H. Hill being one of the worst. Hill simply disappears from the story for no reason. A second major problem is the charges Jackson brought against Richard Garnett. This case became a major question in the army and in Richmond. Again, nothing is mentioned. Neither is the arrest of John Bell Hood in 1862. The removal of Magruder, Holmes and Huger at the end of The Seven Days Campaign is for "dissatisfaction with the level of aggressiveness". Little is said about the command problems throughout The 7 Days campaign or the fiasco of Malvern Hill.
The 1862 invasion of Maryland signaled a shift away from fighting defensive war, which was unpopular with many solders. These men objected to invasion exhibiting strong feelings that resulted in many temporary reassignments. The author rejects this, stating that the 1862 invasion was popular and part of a long-term Southern strategy to win the war. His version is that their is little objection and the soldiers were happy to invade the North. Only in an endnote does he acknowledge this version is at odds with the majority of historians. However, he provides little information to allow the reader to understand this departure from accepted history. This departure is hardly acknowledged and his version is presented as the accepted one.
At Chancellorsville, Howard's refusal to entrench is not mentioned. Reasons why the Union flank is unprotected and the serious moral problems in the XI Corps rate zero lines. Hard fighting by Jackson's men coupled with Lee's brilliant strategy is the story. Little is said about Hooker being knocked unconscious by a cannon ball. We read even less about the impact Hooker being disabled has on Union command & control during the second day of battle. Steven Sears considers these major events affecting the entire battle but they hardly rate mentioning in this book.
Religion is a major story in the history of this army. Lee and Jackson were very religious and this was communicated to the men. Steven E. Woodworth details this in "While God is Marching On". This excellent book covers religion on both sides during the war. While not everyone was religious, chaplains were not all cowards and more than 10% of the men were involved in the great revivals. Once again, the author's unverified account is at odds with what other authors say.
I am not sure we are talking about the same battle of Gettysburg. Coddington cannot be right if the author's version is correct. There is nothing about the possible agreement between Lee and Longstreet on tactics for the campaign and expected battle. Longstreet has no objections to or problems with Pickett's Charge. July 3 is a well-planned day. The only problem being on Culp's Hill, where early Union attacks to straighten the line upset the timetable. The author informs us that Pickett is flanked on the South because Perry's Brigade veers away. However, Pickett's Charge was broken prior to Perry going forward.
The author states that the Army of the Potomac's Iron Brigade was routed during the battle of the Wilderness. In fact, most histories of this brigade end with Gettysburg where the unit took over 1,200 casualties. Wikipedia states "The Iron Brigade lost its all-Western status ... following its crippling losses at Gettysburg ... However, the brigade that succeeded it ... included the survivors of the Iron Brigade." Alan T. Nolan's definitive study of this unit ends at Gettysburg. The Iron Brigade is not around to be routed at the battle of The Wilderness and neither is the parent I Corps. Both of the units were disbanded due to losses at Gettysburg.
The chapter "Blacks and the Army" is an example of the good work Joseph Glatthaar is capable of doing. In this chapter, he talks about Black Confederates and the demise of slavery in Virginia. Throughout the book, we hear about black body servants, free blacks and slaves working with and for the army. Here he admits to a consistent black population throughout the war in the Army of Northern Virginia. While numbers are open to question, the fact of Black Confederates is not.
The statistical analysis seems complete and is rather detailed; I am not in a position to evaluate his numbers. They do not seem inconsistent with other numbers. The author writes well and while a dry subject, it is presented in a readable manner.
Two excellent background chapters are "Arms and Ammunition" and "Medical Care". Both are detailed and cover a complex subject in an understandable way. The AoNV suffers bad artillery ammunition throughout the war. This chapter presents the technical explanation of why. The author's treatment of medical care is very fair, demonstrating an understanding of what they knew.
The chapter on POWs is poor. In it, the author states that men in Northern POW camps except for boredom were no worse off than in the trenches. Even if this is statistically supportable, it is an incurable statement. I doubt few men at Elmira would have hesitated to exchange places with a man in their regiment in 1864. "While in the Hands of the Enemy" is a very fair history of Civil War POW camps and the reason why POWs were so badly treated.
One review states the author has an agenda. I cannot agree or disagree with the reviewer. The author spends much of his time on slavery, percentages of soldiers owning slaves, soldiers from families that own slaves or from households with slaves. He is convinced that the war is over slavery and states that multiple times. However, he follows the Lost Cause Mythology during the Overland Campaign. Grant is a butcher with no ability to plan or to do anything but throw his troops at entrenchments. Gordon Rhea's study of the Overland Campaign debunks this idea. Other times, whatever the subject, the glass always seems half-empty when talking about the Confederacy. He is consistent in having the glass half-full when talking about Lee. This produces an odd narrative balance that is disconcerting and seems dishonest.
This is a readable book with logical arguments. Many readers will accept the author's history as fact. This will require them to unlearn most of this book. An experience reader can throw out the errors and gain some information from the background chapters. I am very disappointed, having eagerly anticipated reading this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Heart of General Lee's Army, September 28, 2008
By 
Rea Andrew Redd "Civil War Librarian" (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania metropolitan region) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse (Hardcover)
General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse, Joseph Glatthaar, Free Press, 624 pages, 19 maps, 41 photographs, appendix, notes, bibliopraphy, index, $35.00.

An exceptional history by professional standards and a thoroughly entertaining work! Glatthaar's General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse is a finely balanced match of statistics and story. Not driven by campaigns and chronology, but by the soldiers and their voices, Glathaar's effort opens the Army of Northern Virginia in a way unlike Douglas Southall Freeman's Lee's Lieutenants. Recently, several battle studies have used soldiers' diaries in an intimate way; Rable's Fredericksburg! Fredericksburg!; John Michael Priests' Antietam: The Soldiers' Battle, Tracey Power's Lee's Miserables: Life in the Army of Northern Virginia from the Wilderness to Appomattox and Noah Trudeau's Gettysburg: A Testing of Courage. Glathaar has managed in 472 pages of narrative (yes, there are 150 pages of appendix, notes, bibliography and index) to re-introduce both the scholar and the lay reader to the Army of Northern Virginia.

Those readers who enjoy Bell Irvin Wiley's Johnny Reb and Billy Yank, John Billings' Coffee and Hardtack or Sam Watkins' Company Atchshould confidently approach General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse. Individual chapters focus upon religion and morality, arms and ammunition, combat, the homefront, medical care, desertion, and black Confederates. Campaigns and their battles are covered as they impact the soldiers in the ranks. Lee is treated honestly and without hagiography or disdain. Slavery is put in its place as a cause of the war, as a cause worth dying for and as a cause for regret.

CWL will place it on the Top Ten of 2008 and will return to General Lee's Army: From Victory of Collapse again. Most moving for CWL were three chapters 'The Grind of War', 'Spiral of Defeat' and 'The Final Days.' The collapse of the Army of the Northern Virginia, after a year of sacrifice beyond endurance by the men in the ranks, is nearly heartbreaking.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse
General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse by Joseph T. Glatthaar (Hardcover - March 18, 2008)
Used & New from: $0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.