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Generation X Classic - Volume 2
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on April 20, 2013
This volume focuses on the aftermath of the Age of Apocalypse. Lobdell did a great job writing the whole cast and was able to make them very relatable to the young adults/teens. From that awkward scene where Paige gets drunk and very emotionally expressive, Everett demonstrating his leaderships skills, Jubilee being ummm Jubilee (lol), Mondo's introduction being the laid back member, Monet's mysterious and secretive side (despite that most of her teammates judged her highly) to Jonothon's shining moments against Omega Red. Lobdell was able to express every character uniquely. One of the greatest moments I loved in the book was when the Gen X kids went to Westchester County to visit Xavier Institute for Higher Learning after the Gene Nation incident. The part where Jubilee and Wolverine reunited for a short while was one of those heartfelt memorable scenarios in the whole series. Don't get me wrong, I mean come on Wolverine saying "Stay in School kid" to Jubilee was sheer priceless. Plus telling her that he (acting all fatherly) was proud of her decision to keep studying to improve her powers was what made Wolvie and Jubee's father/daughter relationship well received towards the Wolverine fandom. Plus like I said advocating the "stay in school message" toward the readers and how it was written in the story effectively was great (since Marvel back in the 90's had a lot of this promos advocating kids going /staying in school and saying no to drugs!) Another part that should be pointed out is the addition of the other two new students, Artie and Leech. The chapter where Synch and Skin helped them build their Tree House at the Biosphere gave the lighter side of the series' cast. Lobdell made sure that this team was about young individuals and their struggles on being accepted not only towards the major society that hates and fears them but also towards themselves as well. We all know that the Gen X kids are known for their not so powerful mutant abilities and that made their struggle even more challenging. Their teachers, Emma Frost and Banshee share the same struggle themselves. Displaying their capabilities of leading and taking responsibility for the kids. Emma's irrational and harsh decision making and Sean's self - doubt in teaching/leading the new generation of X-Men. Another thing to be pointed out in this volume was showcasing the comedic and out of this world fantasy moments as well. This was seen on issue 8 and 9 where the whole team (except Artie and Leech) visited Ireland to investigate the disappearance of Cassidy Keep. Plus in the major stoy line development, the secret of the St. Croix family had been finally introduced to us in this volume. All in all Lobdell did an awesome job with Generation X and despite that Bachalo did not do most of the art in this book was still enjoyable. I have to be honest though, I was not a big fan with the works of the guest artists but appreciated their contributions in the book nonetheless. The whole point in the art direction of the Generation X kids was that the series was an epitome of 90's pop culture! Chris Bachalo's art portrayed the whole 90's so well, you feel like it was actually still 1995! I have to also point out that this was the part in Bachalo's career where we could actually see the evolution/change of his art style in which we are now accustomed to on his much recent works we see in Wolverine and the X-Men and Bendis' Uncanny X-Men series (you could actually see the difference from the San Diego preview story and issue 5 and 6). Roger Cruz's art was an example of the common 90's art style and I guess in a way reminded me of Rob Liefeld's work (be it a postive or negative thing, you be the judge.) Val Semeiks in my opinion did an okay job in issue 11, I didn't really like some of his works on Chamber but most of his work in the book was actually good. I loved the fact that the comics were arranged in chronological order including the 1995 annual and the San Diego preview comic con special. The whole book ended well with the "Opening Volley" story, which was the San Diego Preview comic bonus material I mentioned a while ago, this chapter made the readers feel that we will indeed read more fun and exciting misadventures from these young individuals in the next volume (If ever Marvel decides to publish a volume 3.)
I started reading Generation X when I was 8 and now that I am older I enjoyed and appreciated Lobdell's and Bachalo's creation immensely. The point is that this series passed the test of time and that Generation X was not just another X-Men 90's spin-off series. It took a while for Marvel to release the second volume (3 years to be exact, volume 1 was released on 2010) and maybe because this series was not advertised well and did not have much support from the publisher. This was just based on my personal observation. I did not even know about the first volume, not until I read it on the Generation X Wikipedia article which ended up making me order and get myself a copy via Amazon. I did not even see volume 1 being sold in any bookstore or comic shop I went. Fans of this series should show more support by buying the books. If your one of the newer generation of comic readers who discovered comic-dom because of the bigger movie productions like Avengers, then I recommend you grab a copy of Generation X series and I promise you that you will indeed like and enjoy the series! I recommend this to anyone who wants to see a different kind of story-telling for the X-Men franchise. This was exceptionally one of the well written YA/Teen books in the comic genre and did not have those infamous 90's cliche and complicated plots, well not yet that is. I really do hope Marvel does decide to continue releasing this collected classic series.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon February 9, 2013
Collecting: Generation X #5-11
--Generation X Annual '95
--Generation X San Diego Preview

Bonus: Pin-up Art Gallery

Following from the successful series launch (see X-Men: Generation X Classic, Vol. 1 ) writer Scott Lobdell continues to an excellent run on one of the most successful junior X-Men titles. Jubilee is always at the heart of this young mutant team as they bounce from a run in with Morlock terrorists to an all out battle with Omega Red. The charm of the Generation X team is largely their lack of off-the-charts superpowers. Jubilee can shoot fireworks from her fingers. Skin can stretch his skin. Husk can shed layers of skin. Chamber and M round out the team with a bit more formidable firepower. The unlikely pair of Banshee and Emma Frost serve as headmasters.

The artwork in these collected issues starts strong with Chris Bachalo's brilliant work in issues 5 & 6. Val Semeiks' artwork for issue 11 is also particularly noteworthy.

Generation X Classic is recommended to X-fans who might be interested in following some of the early adventures of some characters that have become regular cast members in other books. It is also recommended as a rare example of an especially well scripted "teen" book.
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