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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Understanding other generations.
This study of the beliefs and values of the major generational groups and their attitudes to each other provides a thorough basis for understanding issues that are likely to arise in the workplace. The authors highlight the very different attitudes to work, life and the importance of life style between the generations. They offer ideas for dealing effectively with each...
Published on June 8, 2000 by Bill Godfrey

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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars For managers, with a grain of salt, please
Never before has there been such diversity in the workforce. This is particularly true of the range of ages that co-exist on the job. In Generations At Work, the authors identify the four generations, the particular problems you may encounter managing them, and potential solutions. As the employee pool matures, this is knowledge every manager of a cross-generational...
Published on March 3, 2006 by Amazon Customer


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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars For managers, with a grain of salt, please, March 3, 2006
Never before has there been such diversity in the workforce. This is particularly true of the range of ages that co-exist on the job. In Generations At Work, the authors identify the four generations, the particular problems you may encounter managing them, and potential solutions. As the employee pool matures, this is knowledge every manager of a cross-generational workforce will need. These categories are, of course, cut rather broad. This book is probably better used as an idea toolbox than gospel writ.

The Generations:

1. Veterans (1922-1943): The World War II generation's dedication to the values of civic pride, loyalty and respect for authority have become a continuing influence in the following generations.

· Veterans tend to be more directive in leadership roles.

· Veterans are used to working in teams under strong leadership.

· Veterans can be prone to the "we've never done it that way before" mentality.

· Veterans often find technology intimidating and confusing.

2. Boomers (1943-1960): This generation tends to be idealistic and driven.

· Find out how they want to be managed.

· Expect a reaction if things don't go well.

· Motivate them with lots of public recognition, and involvement in decision-making.

· When mentoring them be tactful, let them tell you how they're doing, and think of yourself as a friendly equal.

3. Xers (1960-1980): The Xers are deeply cynical about management and the driven attitudes of the Veterans and Boomers. It is, however, possible to motivate Xers.

· Make your work environment as flexible as possible.

· Provide them with up-to-date technology.

· Give them lots of simultaneous projects and let them prioritize.

· Give them constructive feedback on their job performance.

4. Nexters (1980-2000): The most studied generation in history, Nexters are likely to be more like the veterans than any other group. When recruiting Nexters, keep the following principles in mind:

· Forget gender roles.

· Focus on teams.

· Mind the gap: there is likely to be a large generational gap between the Xers and the Nexters.

· Grow your training department.

· Establish mentor programs.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Understanding other generations., June 8, 2000
By 
Bill Godfrey (Mt Stuart, TAS Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This study of the beliefs and values of the major generational groups and their attitudes to each other provides a thorough basis for understanding issues that are likely to arise in the workplace. The authors highlight the very different attitudes to work, life and the importance of life style between the generations. They offer ideas for dealing effectively with each generation and with the differences between them.
The book is readable and well set out. A chapter is devoted to each generation group, each with useful tabulations and comparisons. This is followed by case studies of good inter-generational relationships and a couple of chapters of advice.
The book is concerned primarily with the present - that is with how these differences impact on today's working life, but the sketches of each generation also provide insights into what may happen to work arrangements as different value systems become dominant.
An interesting and important question of course is 'What is going to happen to business itself, its values and its relationship to wider society?' Unfortunately this question is not even raised, the implicit assumption being that business will continue unchanged even if ways of organising and doing business change. A dangerous assumption!
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fetishization of Boomers & Millennials, August 6, 2004
Inspired by Neil Strauss's and Neil Howe's groundbreaking generational studies, "Generations At Work" is a readable and easily understandable primer to successfully understanding and coping with a heretofore unprecedented socioeconomic phenomenon--a workplace simultaneously containing several generations; from elders in their 70s to young people in their 20s.

The authors do a good job of explaining and describing each group's attitudes, shared beliefs, investment practices, buying habits and work methods--all of these having been shaped by different historical events (at least in the USA) and the relevant generational experiences derived from those events. The book also contains a series of sample profiles and vignettes which are a useful basis for comprehending and motivating (and marketing and selling to) various age groups.

On the minus side, far too much obsessive attention and empty praise has been generously lavished on the still-untested Millennials--almost to the point of evangelistically fetishizing them much like the Soviet Communist Party had for decades emptily and shrilly fetishized their "Heroes of Labor" and similar groups. I suspect this approach (with its hardy and predictable but now-less-obvious condescending and dismissive attitude toward Generation X) reflects the arrogant Boomer sensibility of the book's authors. Also, this sensibility distressingly takes a far too comfortable and friendly view toward conventional corporatism, bureaucracy, "centralized authority," "obedience," and "large-scale collectivism"--when our increasingly fragmented, rapidly changing, networked and multipolar world is generally leaving such paradigms (and the institutions, attitudes and politico-economic theories such paradigms spawned) in the dust.

The underlying agenda of this book seems be that, as a group, the "we will never die" Boomers, despite their apparent claims to the contrary, will hand off their control-freak worldviews to their Millennial offspring, while barely tolerating "Veterans" and "Xers" (seemingly hoping the former will quickly jackknife into coffins or nursing homes and that the latter will remain lifelong subordinates and assistants to Boomers and their Millennial heirs apparent.) Also, there were several noticeable spelling and grammatical errors in the book (the confusion of "proscribed" with "prescribed" for one)--not very complimentary to the Boomer authors and their peers who self-referentially pride themselves on being more sophisticated, better educated and more voracious readers than "the rest of us."
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Generations in Health Care, January 27, 2000
By 
Karen Poor (St. Paul, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
Managing the many different types of people in health care is very challenging! I already knew about the difficulties that dealing with many different disciplines and cultures presented, but this book gave me a new way to look at the different cultures of age!
This book was written in a very easy to read format, with lots of information on the personalities, attitudes, and work habits of the different generations. The practical tips in this book were very helpful to my own managerial practice. Even though this book used business examples, I found it very applicable to the health care setting. Often, problems that are found in business are multiplied in health care because we deal with people who are sick, injured, or at the end of life.
I highly recommend this book to anyone who has to work with people who spring from different generations.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Practical magic for anyone working with multiple generations, October 12, 1999
By 
In "Generations at Work," Zemke, Raines, and Filipczak not only deliver a valuable compilation of facts about the attitudes, habits and reactions of current generations, they offer excellent suggestions for tactics to employ when interacting with "those other guys." If you need to expand your comfort zone for working with mixed generations, of if you have to train your employees or teammates to do so, this book is your best resource. It's an operator's manual for working with others in the 21st century enterprises.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Avoiding Perception Pitfalls, February 18, 2000
By 
Dean Langenfeld (The frozen tundra of Minnesota) - See all my reviews
Are GenXers to be viewed as disloyal or entrepreneurial? This book is great in explaining that both perceptions could be considered correct. Compared to their elders, where company loyalty was rewarded with job security, the younger generations have seen lay-offs loom at the slightest downtick of the company stock. In response they've developed the attitude of "no job is forever", and coupled with the frenetic pace of technical innovation in which they've steeped themselves, they're off to the races.
The authors of "Generations at Work" do a masterful job of explaining the motivations of the different generations and how management can best utilize these dynamics to the benefit of all. Not only to the bottom line, but to the workplace harmonics and standard of living as well. Written with a healthy dose of humor, it's one of those books that's hard to put down, unlike many similar works on the topic that should only be used as a cure for insomnia.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Road Map for the New Millenium Manager, November 1, 1999
By A Customer
The authors have captured the essence and spirit of each generation found in the workplace with humor and practical help for the manager and employee alike!! In my own work area the book has become a great conversation starter for all of ages!! It offers insight into motivation, team work, and development!! The short cut boxes in each chapter are Great!!!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good read, February 26, 2006
I liked this book since it gave me an insight into the different components of each generation and how to deal with them at work as well as in general. I manage early boomers to nexters and am a Gen Xer and this book will help a great deal with that challenging task.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful for dealing with today's mined workplace, February 15, 2000
Whether you are the manager or the managed, today's workplace has some unusual demands in terms of generation conflict and change. In many ways, older workers feel slighted when their experience is discounted in the face of the technical expertise of younger workers. At the same time, younger workers make big mistakes when they rush ahead without considering that experience and what it can bring to the success of a diverse team. This book gives some good ideas for understanding what generations mean in terms of workplace cohesiveness -- or the lack thereof.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for any manager!, December 18, 2002
By A Customer
I've also had the opportunity to hear co-author Claire Raines speak on the topic of generational interaction in the workplace. If you have that good fortune, I suggest you go as well. Her grasp on how each genre of people fit (or don't) in the workplace is excellent and this knowledge has helped me in many management situations.
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