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Genesis Unbound: A Provocative New Look at the Creation Account Paperback – March 1, 1996

4.3 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 257 pages
  • Publisher: Multnomah Books (March 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0880708689
  • ISBN-13: 978-0880708685
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #963,266 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Dr. Sailhamer is one of the world's foremost Hebrew Scholar's. His scholarship is only surpassed by his devotion to the Biblical text. Dr. Sailhamer is committed both to the authority and the inerrancy of the original manuscripts. His book is an honest, in depth, scholarly study of the Biblical texts of creation geared toward the layman. He views the creation account as a literal, historical account and the days of creation as literal 24 hour days. The essence of Dr. Sailhamer's book is that Genesis 1:1 describes the creation of the universe during an indeterminate amount of time; Genesis 1:2-2:4a describe the preparation of the land (the Garden of Eden/Promised Land) over six literal days. This is NOT a variation on the GAP Theory, nor is it an attempt to twist the Scriptures into compliance with contemporary views of science. It is the attempt of a brilliant and godly man to wrestle with the Scriptures in order to gain a better understanding of the meaning of the text. His interpretation is always based on the Hebrew text, its grammar, syntax and, most important of all, its context. Any honest scholar will admit that no interpretation of the Genesis account is entirely satisfying; all are to a greater or lesser degree problematic. Dr. Sailhamer's work comes closest to providing a satisfying solution, a solution that is consistent with the context of Genesis 1:1-2:4a, as will as the context of the entire book of Genesis, the Pentateuch and the whole of the Scriptures. If you would like a more in depth study of Genesis I would highly recommend Sailhamer's commentary on Genesis in the "Expositor's Bible Commentary" and his book "Pentateuch as Narrative". Sailhamer's works on Genesis and the Pentateuch have replaced Umberto Cassuto's writings as my most valued secondary sources for the study of the Pentateuch.
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Format: Paperback
this is definitely one of the more memorable theological books i've read. i'm sure sailhamer has gotten some flack for his departure from the "orthodox". basically he suggests that Genesis 1 may be more a descrition of God's prepararion of the promised land rather than simply a literal (if not brief) synopsis of the creation of the universe. whether one believes, hates, or passively accepts the various assumptions of "evolution", one must at least wonder how we (as Christians) are to view scientific facts and theories that conflict with the biblical message (or at least our perceptions thereof). sailhamer's suggestion is not a new one. this can be found as well in earlier work by j lightfoote as well as some older rabbinic writings. anyway, this is a fast read and will be worth the time!
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Format: Paperback
This book challenged almost everything I have been told or thought about the Genesis account of creation. The author asserts that modern translations, including the King James Version, suffer from cosmological presuppositions that bias our reading of the ancient account. Very compelling.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As an exegete, Sailhamer falls largely within a conservative evangelical tradition that strongly respects the authority of the original text and assumes that it teaches authoritatively. This book will probably be most appealing to readers who want an interpretation of the Genesis creation narrative that leaves traditional doctrine on human origins unaltered, while providing accommodation on issues related to the age of the earth. His perspective is not precisely identical to the "gap" theory of the Scofield Reference Bible, but it does have some important philosophical overlap with that approach.

Sailhamer's approach is to "localize" the scope of the seven-day Genesis creation account, identifying it as God's creative work within a small area of creation (essentially, the garden of Eden and its surrounding region), rather than reading it as a universal cosmology. This allows him to retain a fairly literal reading ("days" are just days) and to focus on the unique role of humans as overseers of that small pocket of creation, a bit like commanders exerting authority in the invasion of a hostile territory. He generally acknowledges Darwinian natural selection mechanisms as a reality, but sees them more as indicative of a fallen creation in need of redemption rather than (as might a theistic evolutionist) a tool used by God. This approach works best in the context of a theology that embraces the idea of God engaging in a longstanding campaign of spiritual war against the forces of sin and death, one that extends into the natural world with specially created humans as His champions.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Just when you think your options on creation boil down to "A" and "B", John presents a thought-provoking "C." For anyone struggling to sort out the young versus old earth debate, this will just might settle the issue for you. He's not alone in his view on this -- see desiringgod.org.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was put onto to Sailhamer from an interview I watched with John Piper.
Sailhamer argues that the Genesis 1:1-2 is not a heading but describes the creation of the universe "in the beginning" [a time period that cannot be determined from the text". The six days are literal but later but preparation of "the land" for the man that he would create on the sixth day. Man then is a more recent addition to a creation of uncertain age.
The case is argued and referenced well.
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