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Gentlemen Prefer Blondes Paperback – August 17, 1998

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes brings back the durable Lorelei Lee, the 'Little Girl From Little Rock,' whose successful career as a paid companion to gents-usually married-('Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend') has fueled several successful stage musicals and movies...Lorelei tours the world, going from man to man in a lighthearted spoof of 'traditional family values.' -- The Arizona Daily Star, August 1998

It is not often that a great book makes a great movie, but this is the case here: Both are superb....I see from the book's cover that Edith Wharton called Loos's book "the great American novel." that goes a little too far, but I see what she--she, in particular--means. A girl like I thinks it makes an ideal valentine. -- Boston Sunday Globe, Katherine A. Powers, 14 February 1999

It's a pleasure to report that Anita Loos's "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" is once more in print....The sect to Loos's novel is that it's narrated by Lorelei, a beautiful smart/dumb woman who as at once calculating, strong-willed, and ignorant about anything except her remarkable expertise at Subject A....Lorelei is a calculating monster; [but] she's charming and funny. You might say she gives good value....You won't be sorry. -- Palm Beach Post, Scott Eyman, 15 November 1998

The great American novel. -- Edith Wharton

About the Author

Born in California, Anita Loos (1893–1981) was herself a celebrity of the Jazz Age that produced Lorelei Lee. She began writing movie scripts by the time she was twelve, and before her death in 1981 she had written an enormous number of stories, screenplays, and more. She was also the author of an autobiography, A Girl Like I.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Liveright (August 17, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0871401703
  • ISBN-13: 978-0871401700
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 0.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #372,899 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
You could say that author/screenwriter Anita Loos invented the chick-lit genre. Her entertainingly fluffy satire "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" certainly fits the bill, with its love-seeking heroine and amusing jokes. It never dips far below the surface, but its lightness is part of its appeal.

"A gentleman friend and I were dining at the Ritz last evening and he said that if I took a pencil and a paper and put down all of my thoughts it would make a book." Meet Lorelei Lee, a pretty blonde socialite with a love of jewels, men, and luxury. She has a married boyfriend, but is convinced to go abroad so her name won't be "smirched."

So Lorelei and her pal Dorothy head off to Europe, bumping into exalted people (like "Dr. Froyd") and winning the hearts of wealthy men, in between days-long parties. Gold-digging, millionaires, money and love all get wrapped up in the tangle of Lorelei's everyday life...

Lorelei first appeared in Harper's Bazaar, and a short story stretched out into a full-length novel that appeared in serials. A first edition sold out almost instantly. Now Lorelei has countless descendents -- sure, those determined gals have been updated for the twenty-first century, with jobs and Web access. But light women's fiction could be seen to stem from Loos's novel.

A satirical edge runs through "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes," poking fun at the jazzy gals whom Loos had to deal with regularly. Loos doesn't spare anything -- the book is riddled with intentional typos, like "encyclopediacs," "safires" and "maskerades" (yet she can spell "champagne"). The shallowness of the flappers is best shown in straight-faced jokes about the latest Parisian styles of buttons.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sye Sye on March 9, 2009
Format: Paperback
I am surprised to find reviews dipping below the appropriate 5 star. I guess many people in our era look from 'politically correct' viewpoints. Any book you read comes from a specific point in time and social view point. Boring advice aside:

This is one of the best comedy books around, so deliciously light and speedy, the reader needs a few reads to really understand the depth of Loos' genius. But, upfront, this is a laugh a minute and should be read in bed on a rainy Sunday morning with phones off.

"Dorothy looked at me and looked at me and she really said she thought my brains were a miracle. I mean she said my brains reminded her of a radio because you listen to it for days and days and you get discouradged and just when you are getting ready to smash it, something comes out that is a masterpiece."

Read, enjoy, repeat. But try to get an edition with Ralph Barton's intimate illustrations.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 15, 1999
Format: Paperback
Anita Loos's "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" is a comic masterpiece. Loos tells the story of Lorelei Lee, a blond, money-seeker, opportunist girl on a trip through Europe. From Now York to London, to Paries and all the way through Vienna Lorelei meets lots of gentlemen, charms them, gets money and jewels from them and then light-heartedly leaves them with a short note in which she promises she will meet them somewhere else, perhaps. A real strumpet, Lorelei Lee emerges as a delicius crature from Loos genial prose, and by the end of the book, we have learned to love her.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 5, 1999
Format: Paperback
What a fun, funny little book. Lorelei's thoughts and interpretations of her life as she effortlessly moves from one gentleman to another are very amusing. There is never a dull moment as she sweeps across America and Europe, leaving a trail of used up gentlemen behind her. Fascinating and wickedly funny. I'm very glad I read this. (And I can't wait to see the movie with Marilyn Monroe.)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By vs on April 1, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is a very funny little book about exploits of a "professional lady" Lorelei Lee, her profitable relationships with men of all social strata, her skillful handling of their wives, mothers, friends and all other inhabitants of Jazz Age world.

The author, Anita Loos, was a celebrity in the first half of the Twentieth century, and she definitely deserves to be much better known today, if only because of this single book, where Loos demonstrates style, taste, and great satirical talent. In addition to all that, there's a lot of interesting details in this book, giving the reader a very vivid picture of life in the 1920's.

The book is written in a form of Lorelei Lee's diary. Loos uses her heroine's bad spelling skills to create delightful word play throughout the text, and she does is with great taste and sense of humor.

Lots of phrases and passages in the book are so funny and smart they just beg to be quoted:

. When a girl really enjoys being with a gentleman it puts her to quite a disadvantage and no real good can come of it.
. Kissing your hand may make you feel very very good but a diamond and sapphire bracelet lasts forever.

And here's one a bit longer:

May 20th:

Well today Mr. Spoffard is going to take me all around to all of the museums in Munchen, which are full of kunst which I really ought to look at, but Dorothy said she had been punished for all of her sins last night, so now she is going to begin life all over again by going out with her German gentleman friend, who is going to take her to a house called the Half Brow house which is the world largest size of a Beer Hall. So Dorothy said I could be a high brow and get full of kunst, but she is satisfide to be a Half brow and get full of beer.
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