Genuine question for the fans (non flame)


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Showing 1-7 of 7 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 10, 2012 7:14:51 AM PST
J. Lindeboom says:
A genuine question for those who enjoyed the book.

If Christian wasn't described as this insanely good looking guy, but as an average / ordinary looking man, would the story still be appealing to you?

Posted on Nov 10, 2012 7:44:22 AM PST
Jaime says:
Seriously not a fan (I shudder at the very idea), but I think I already know what the answer is.

And its no. These books are like wish fulfillment for every woman that enjoys them. Nothing wrong with wish fulfillment, in itself. One of the purposes of reading is to be transported to far away worlds. In this case, to a 10,000 dollar bed and be made love to by a dreamy, sexy billionaire. Where would the escapism be if Edward...I mean, Chedward, was just some ordinary guy? Being dominated, threatened, frightened and raped by him would certainly lose all its appeal if he was just fat, smelly and didn't have a helicopter like every other man.

Do you think Anabella would have hesitated to call the cops when Christward broke into her condo to rape her if he wasn't so OMG HOT? Of course not. Because being assaulted by ugly people is so not fun. I'm sure its the exact same way for everyone who loves this series.

Posted on Nov 10, 2012 12:39:32 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 12, 2012 4:50:39 AM PST
Frankie says:
I think the problem here is that male sexual behavior has been so vilified in the past 40 years that when a female responds positively to sexual aggression it is seen as aberrant rather than normal. The definition of rape has been expanded to the point where it is considered rape when a woman doesn't verbally affirm she wants sex, but instead allows herself to be "taken". I think that the epidemic of rape on college campuses is a result of this attitude. Girls have been so conditioned to think that the boy will ask her if she wants to have sex with him that they feel free to put themselves in very foolish positions; dressing provocatively, getting drunk and going to a boy's room. What does she think is on the boy's mind when she does that? In his mind, she has already consented. If the young man is less aggressive, he will probably back off should she start to protest, but a more aggressive man is likely to push the issue. I know it is very politically incorrect to say the woman has some responsibility for what happens in these situations, but I don't care. I think she does.

So, back to Christian. He is very sexually aggressive. Despite all the denial of the past 40 years, women actually like that. Now, if a woman wasn't attracted to the man, and he pursued her, she would consider it stalking. But I think that deep down, a woman wants a man she is attracted to to pursue her, even if she knows he's not really suitable. He doesn't necessarily have to be that good looking, or rich, he just has to have that sexual magnetism.

So, out comes 50 Shades of Grey, and it breaks all the rules that feminists have been creating for the past 40 years. And, those that have bought into those rules simply can't understand that you just don't undo hundreds of thousands of years of evolution in a couple of generations. Women like the way Christian acts. They may not want that in their own man, but they like the sexual fantasy. The cave man that drags the woman back to his cave by her hair may no longer be acceptable, but there's obviously still a place for him in the bed room.

That being said, I didn't really like the books. Christian was just too over the top. Give me Jamie Fraser any day.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 10, 2012 4:35:10 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 10, 2012 4:35:39 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on May 25, 2013 10:32:15 AM PDT
I don't think Ana would find him appealing. A basis for most nonfiction books is to have a good looking lead male character. We all want this in our fantasies right? So no, I probably wouldn't. Then again I am disappointed in this book. The male character's age is too unbelievably young to own a big company. Anastasia is a naive virgin, but then again Christian is attracted to that in a submissive he can mold to his own.

In reply to an earlier post on May 25, 2013 12:04:24 PM PDT
E. S. Marcos says:
I don't think the sex fantasies of a couple have anything to do with whether or not the woman and man believe in equal rights. I think you're confusing sex fantasies with real life.

In reply to an earlier post on May 25, 2013 12:10:24 PM PDT
W. Westphal says:
"Anastasia is a naive virgin, but then again Christian is attracted to that in a submissive he can mold to his own."

Predators always are.
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Participants:  6
Total posts:  7
Initial post:  Nov 10, 2012
Latest post:  May 25, 2013

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Fifty Shades of Grey: Book One of the Fifty Shades Trilogy
Fifty Shades of Grey: Book One of the Fifty Shades Trilogy by E. L. James (Paperback - April 3, 2012)
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