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20 of 27 people found the following review helpful
on July 3, 2009
George Lois is one the more celebrated ad men from the early days of advertising. He no doubt had great talent and was prolific. Unfortunately he apparently took credit for as many ideas that were created by others as he created himself.

Apparently George Lois' biggest idea was to take credit for others' work.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on October 22, 2009
Just a warning dont buy this book of burgled ideas. George Lois was someone I looked up to until I delved deeper in to the origin of the Volkswagen creative. He stole credit for that. That and so many other big ideas. I can not recommend a book on ideas by a man that stole them. Shame Mr. Lois.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on February 3, 2011
Having worked closely with George in the mid 70's on two major accounts, I was shocked when he repeatedly took credit, not only for the "great Ideas" he conceived, but also for the numerous creative executions of those ideas by others. The NYC OTB "personality" campaign circa 1975 comes to mind. Giving credit to the hard work and creativity of others on that and other similar high profile and successful campaigns would have been the right thing to do.
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Nice book for a coffee table. However, being an art student, you learn where most modern icons get their inspiration. I like this better than "Damn Good Advice".
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on August 3, 2010
I'm not historically knowledgable enough to speak to the 2 earlier reviews that claim that Mr. Lois "stole" some of his ideas..... (although it sure does sound like sour grapes, based on the way those reviews are written.)

What I can speak to is the overall quality of the material presented within, and the experience of reading this book cover to cover. In short: this book is absolutely fantastic. I am a graphic designer, and ideas are the currency of my trade. But Lois takes it to another level. Beyond any single image or story presented here, what's most impressive about this collection of projects is Lois' overall process / spirit, which helps him find fresh approaches and vantage points into virtually any topic under the sun. Put this book on your shelf and pull it down whenever you need a kick in the butt, brain or funny bone.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on February 25, 2011
I almost didn't buy this book because of the negative reviews. That is until I read the negative reviews and found they were all centered on George Lois the man and not the book itself. You'll note that the 5 and 4-star reviews all speak directly to the book.

But here's one thing even the positive reviews don't tell you: the book is physically gorgeous! This is a large, hardcover, coffee table-beautiful book, dripping with incredible color photos, fine quality, heavy paper, the works. And it's less than $8. If you saw this book in a bookstore, you'd easily guess that it was in the $30 range. Easy.

And guess what? George Lois really does deliver on the promise of the title. Not by giving you some BS 5-step process to creating a big idea, but by showing you how most of his own "Big Ideas" had their roots in fine art, and the epiphanies that George had in absorbing these great masterworks of other artists.

There are plenty of non-advertising books that I recommend to people in advertising because they are clear, beautiful, interesting books that touch upon the human condition, or art, or communication, or well, just plain life. Books like Walter Murch's The Conversations: Walter Murch and the Art of Editing Film. And there are other books, on advertising, that I recommend because they're just plain important books for anyone in the industry. This book is both. And it costs less than $8! How can you freakin' go wrong?
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on February 3, 2009
I realized that was what was wrong with the Super Bowl commercials the other night. No Big Ideas! Just poorly executed copies from the past. If you want to study the big idea, there is no better place to start then here. George's ideas are as relevant as they were the day they were published. The Original Mad Man. Also try When Advertising Tried Harder.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on October 17, 2012
George Lois is an inspiration. This book of his most famous work (I'd like to see his failures) was a passage through our time. As a boomer and hospitality management school student of hard knocks, I witnessed most of this era in midtown Manhattan. I also served these guys, Lois, Holland and Calloway their lunch. What he says is true. What he creates is genuine. Most of us went out and bought this stuff he sold. I did because I liked their work and they made me laugh when they got mayo on their chins. Lois wraps his work around art and family. His political shape was formed through America's mid-century victory over tyranny. He carried this stand through the turbulent sixties and unrepentant seventies. A pugilist with a pen and paper. The book of "The Big Idea" collects this era like a historical romance novel without the sex. This was the way I remember it. I'm happy I have this great book of George Lois' creative genius to study and learn from. Peter.
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