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George Wallace (Two-Disc Special Edition)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Gary Sinise, Mare Winningham, Angelina Jolie
  • Directors: John Frankenheimer
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC, Subtitled
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo)
  • Subtitles: English, Portuguese, Thai
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: January 20, 2009
  • Run Time: 178 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001BSBC16
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #103,863 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "George Wallace (Two-Disc Special Edition)" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Vision and Conflict: Collaborating on the Wallace Saga: Gary Sinise, Angelina Jolie, Mare Winningham, and others recall the origins and production of this project and share memories of director John Frankenheimer

Editorial Reviews

Based on the book by Marshall Frady, this epic bio directed by the legendary John Frankenheimer, stars Academy® Award nominated actor Gary Sinise as the infamous politician and segregationist George Wallace. Many have portrayed Wallace as a racist but Frankenheimer’s film suggests that it was his lust for power and status that made him bedfellows with racists and one of the most destructive and most hated American politicians of his time. Sinise – who won an Emmy® Award for this performance – brilliantly captures both the corruption and the belated search for redemption. Mare Winningham plays his first wife and Angelina Jolie – in her first major role - his adoring second. Winningham also won an Emmy for her work and the film won the Golden Globe for Best Mini-Series (1997).

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 28 customer reviews
Gary Sinise gives a great performance as the Governor.
Marvin J. Faith
Everything is recreated brilliantly and we feel like we are in the era where the film takes place.
Robert Blake
I like the way that this movie doesn't judge Wallace as good or bad, it leaves that to the viewer.
A Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 17, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
The fighting little judge from Alabama was known as the most liberal judge in Alabama and probably in the South. But one gubernational defeat makes him turn to racism in order to capture the governorship.
Gary Sinise turns in an incredible performance as the governor, he has become one of my favorite actors ever since his equally brilliant performance in "Truman".
I like the way that this movie doesn't judge Wallace as good or bad, it leaves that to the viewer. In one scene you can see Wallace commenting on the beating of Civil Rights activists at the Edmund Pettus Bridge saying "This is a victory for US! We turned them back" and you actually think that Sinise as Wallace believes what he's saying.
The movie presents some historical footage here and there, you can see president Lyndon Johnson and Martin Luther King's famous "how long?" speech.
It does have a number of flaws though, I'd have liked to see more about election 1968, the way Nixon tried to prevent Wallace from becoming governor in 1970 by sponsoring Wallace's opponent, the infamous General Curtis Lemay pressconference. And the fictional character Archie isn't quite pulled off by the director, it strikes me as an anomaly in the movie.
Also it shows Wallace meeting Cornelia, his future second wife at governor Folsom's inaugural in 1955, this would have made Cornelia about 23 years old in 1972 when in fact she was 31. The reason for that is that George and Lurleen met Cornelia at Folsom's FIRST inaugural in 1947 and not 1955
The most moving scene is where Wallace is wheeled into the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church (Dr. King's former church) where he, in front of a stunned black congegation apologizes for his role in black suffering.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Gregor von Kallahann on September 11, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
It's hardly surprising that Ted Turner, a political animal if there ever was one, would turn his TNT productions into a vehicle for politically themed movies. This film, along with "Kingfish" and "Nixon and Kissinger" is the kind of product Turner no doubt loves to sponsor. Those of us who are closet political junkies ourselves, but who may not have the time or inclination to read lengthy biographies of well-known politicos, can at least begin to satisfy our social consciousness jones with these usually worthy efforts.
_George Wallace_ is certainly that--a worthy effort. It does not answer every question I've ever had about the man, but it does provide us with a portrait of a very complex, power-hungry individual, one who sacrificed principal for power and who became a symbol of a kind of racism that he did not really fully embrace. At least as seen by scriptwriter Marshall Frady (on whose book this film is based), Wallace had no particular ax to grind with the black community and was primarily a populist who initially sought the support of all the "folks". One gubernatorial defeat, however, was all it took to convince him that despite his reservations about extremists like the Klan, he would have to play the race card in order to win the governorship of Alabama.
And thereby hangs the tale--or would have if he had not been shot at a political rally in 1972. The film's take on Wallace is that this event and the intense personal suffering that ensued brought about his eventual personal and, to some extent, political redemption. This may well be so, but writer Frady and director John Frankenheimer do slip significantly in presenting this turn-about. Wallace's conversion in the film rings too many false notes.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Robert Blake on April 26, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
"George Wallace" is one of the great biographical TV movies. It's superior to Gary Sinise's previous biographical performance as Harry Truman in HBO's "Truman." Here he gives a performance of raw energy and impact. And no wonder, this was directed by one of the masters of filmmaking, John Frankenheimer. "George Wallace" is a powerful film, a study of a man who once burned with hate and then found redemption after suffering a terrible tragedy. The movie is intelligent, intriguing, moving and hard to forget. It not only looks at Wallace, but also at the era in which he lived. But the best effect of the movie comes near the end with the redemption of Wallace. It's incredible to see him first as a racist burning with hate, stepping in front of a university to prevent blacks from entering, and then being wheeled into a black church to ask for forgiveness. "George Wallace" is a study of power, hate and redemption. Everything is recreated brilliantly and we feel like we are in the era where the film takes place. There is pure style and intelligence here. Frankenheimer brilliantly directs a brilliant script. "George Wallace" is almost on par with Oliver Stone's "Nixon." This is great filmmaking, big screen or small.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Shirley Kacmarik on March 7, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
While I agree that this film may not be totally accurate in an empirical historical sense it does intensely and heatedly resurrect the deep and heartfelt emotional reactions of hate and violence that so dominated the era of Wallace's and his wife's stint at the helm of Alabama. How well I remember seeing the TV clips shown in the movie in my own living room and the feelings of intense dislike for the man called George Wallace. The movie also puts a human face on Wallace that shows the depth to which the man fell in his persuit of political power. I think the imaginary character of Archie served the purpose of helping the viewer to understand, at least in a limited way, the pain that was visited on the black people during this era. Certainly it is easy to see why Gary Sinise won an Emmy for his powerful and intense portrayal of this much despised man.
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