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George vs. George: The Revolutionary War as Seen by Both Sides Hardcover – Multi Pack, October 1, 2004


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George vs. George: The Revolutionary War as Seen by Both Sides + If You Lived At The Time Of The American Revolution
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 4 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 1120L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 64 pages
  • Publisher: National Geographic Children's Books (October 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0792273494
  • ISBN-13: 978-0792273493
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #161,099 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Starred Review. Grade 3-6–A carefully researched, evenhanded narrative with well-crafted, vibrant, watercolor illustrations. Schanzer states that her challenge was to "…cram 20 years of history, biography, and philosophy into a picture book that kids could grasp and enjoy." She has been entirely successful. The introduction sets the tone, introducing both George Washington and King George III, mentioning their differing views, and noting that every story has two sides. The remainder of the book presents these two sides on spreads that alternate between the man and the monarch, with comparisons of the American and British governmental forms, views on taxation, the Boston Tea Party, and coverage of most of the major battles of the Revolutionary War. True to the author's intent, both Georges come off as decent men, with the interests of their respective countries at heart. The illustrations are amazing. Almost Brueghelesque in their detail, they show the major players as they actually looked. Speech balloons reproduce the exact words of the speakers, with appended "Quote Sources." This is a lovely book, showing historical inquiry at its best: consideration of both sides, a sound research basis, attribution of sources, and interesting writing. Written at a higher level than Jean Fritz's Can't You Make Them Behave, King George? (Putnam, 1977), this book provides the perfect meld of instructional tool and general-interest reading.–Ann Welton, Grant Elementary School, Tacoma, WA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Gr. 5-7. With its attractive jacket, its sustained effort to report both British and American points of view, and its fully illustrated overview of events, this colorful book has many qualities that make it a good introduction to the American Revolution. Schanzer lays the groundwork well, profiling England's King George III, America's George Washington, and their respective governments before chronicling the course of the Revolutionary War. Occasionally cartoonlike in their dramatizations and speech balloons, the lively illustrations take up more space than the words, but the text is clearly written. However, near the end the question is asked, "So what was happening to American civilians all this time?" The answer seems to be mayhem: people were tarred and feathered, women raped. Indians "tortured . . . whole families, and scalped the dead" and "honored their bravest victims by eating them." The American troops "showed off pairs of legging made from the skin of dead Indians." Given the book's highly illustrated format, this is too sensationalized for the age group, a jarring note in an otherwise solid offering. Carolyn Phelan
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Author/Illustrator Rosalyn Schanzer's book Witches! The Absolutely True Tale of Disaster in Salem (National Geographic) is the winner of the Gold Medal from the Society of Illustrators for Best Illustrated Children's Book of 2011 and has also received a 2012 Robert F. Sibert Honor Award as one of the year's 5 most distinguished informational books for children. Other awards for this book include:

Starred Review from School Library Journal
SLJ Best Book of the Year
NY Public Library's 25 best Nonfiction Titles of 2011
New York Times Best Books of 2011
A Chicago Public Library Best of the Best Book
Fuse #8 list of 100 Magnificent Children's Books of 2011
Kid Lit Frenzy top 5 Middle Grade Picks of 2011

Schanzer has written and illustrated 16 award-winning books for young people. A world traveler, nationally ranked Masters swimmer, avid photographer, and chocolate connoisseur, she lives in Fairfax Station Virginia with her husband in a house surrounded by birds. You can visit her website at www.rosalynschanzer.com

Customer Reviews

My kids LOVE this book.
M. Heiss
The author does an exceptional job of explaining what life was like at the time and presenting different perspectives on what actually happened.
JH
This is a great book for elementary and middle school wanting to learn about the revolution.
Theresa L. Brown

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

66 of 66 people found the following review helpful By J. Grufman on January 3, 2005
Format: Library Binding
We read this book as part of my son's studies of the American Revolution. In all honesty, until he began these studies, I'd never given much thought to George Washington - now I find myself fascinated by this man's character. While I've graduated to adult literature about our first President, I continue to read my son's books, as well. As this title suggests, the author attempts to present facts (drawn from historical documents) about the Revolutionary War, George Washington and King George III and to demonstrate the two men's reasoning behind the decisions they made and draw parallels between them. I got the feeling that she really wants us to "like" George III, because, according to her research, a majority of Britains did, and he wasn't really a "tyrant". She indicates that while our Declaration of Independence puts all the blame on George III, it was really Great Britain's Parliament that was to blame. George III never meant to harm anyone. Hmmmm. I'll reserve comment on that.

If you're looking for a lot of info about George Washington, this really isn't the book. If you want a children's book where the author attempts to give a look at both sides of the war, she does that here. Her artwork is wonderful in its simplicity, yet still loaded with detail.

One thing missing from this book, since it's as much about differences as it is parallels...My son wondered if George III ever actually fought for his country like George Washington did.

And then, Schanzer has Washington smiling broadly during the charge of the Battle of Princeton, as he says "It's a fine fox chase, my boys." I doubt he smiled at all, simply because he was continuously troubled by painful tooth problems, wore dismally uncomfortable dentures and was very self conscious of the whole matter.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By E. Russell on June 5, 2010
Format: Paperback
Agree with the many positive reviews about this book. I found the illustrations to be exceptional. The text offered clear descriptions of history, but it is up to the reader to interpret to which side the statements should be attributed. Could be confusing for some younger readers. The true descriptions of the tragedy of war (including rape and cannibalism) are mentioned but not elaborated upon in the next, so ensure that your reader is ready for that information. I enjoyed the book and will read selections from it with my 8 year old. And will read it in full with my older children.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By History Lover on January 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Beautifully illustrated book on Revolutionary War that helps explain the war by comparing George Washington and King George III. Accurate information, clearly expressed in readable prose with a good story line. Humorous and very colorful artwork is very appealing. My grandsons, ages 8 and 10, loved it, and so did I. Highly recommend this book, especially if your children are turned off by "history."
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Ulyyf on June 20, 2010
Format: Paperback
Unless you are already a serious historian, I promise you will learn something from this book. It... it may not always be what you WANT to learn (for example, that the Revolutionaries committed atrocities against the Iroquois), but you're bound to learn SOMEthing new.

This is a diligently researched book. Do not let the fact that it is a "picture book" fool you - this book is written at about a seventh grade reading level, and it shows. Many pages of dense text, and a lot more informative than most textbooks I had through high school!

The author worked hard to avoid painting the British and the Loyalists as monsters - and they weren't! They had reasons for their actions just the same as the revolutionaries did. Likewise, she doesn't present the patriots as unalloyed saints - and they weren't, any more than you and I are! They did good things for good reasons, good things for selfish reasons, and bad things for the same reason anybody does bad things. And yes, horrific acts were committed by both sides in this war, against enemies and innocents alike.

The illustrations and quotations enliven and complement the text, but they do not take over the book. I really advise this book for ANYbody wanting to learn more about the Revolution.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By MMM on March 12, 2008
Format: Hardcover
My 8 and 11 year old boys (and I, I must admit), were drawn in by this book and it's interesting illustrations. The page illustrating the different types of soldiers used by each side in the war is just the sort of thing a boy needs to engage his brain in the reading of a "boring" history book! The illustrated diagram of British government, for another example, is so much more effective than a dry paragraph describing the parliamentary system. Thus drawn in, the material found is well-presented. Not perfect, but very good. I did appreciate the author's attempt to present consideration of "both sides," rather than the typical black and white portayal of pure, heroic Americans vs. an evil, irrational enemy. Highly recommended by this homeschooling Mom.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Theresa L. Brown on February 22, 2008
Format: Paperback
This is a great book for elementary and middle school wanting to learn about the revolution. The comic book format makes many of the more complex concepts easy to grasp, and the "Britain vs. America" paradigm teaches that history really depends on the point of view of the person teaching it. For example, the American Colonists are called "rebels" in the book. And so they were, but that description gives the work the American revolutionaries did more heft because it puts them in an historical and political context.
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