Georgia Scenes and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.90
  • Save: $2.34 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by giggil
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Georgia Scenes (Southern Classics Series) Paperback – April 1, 1992


See all 23 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, April 1, 1992
$16.56
$3.00 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$7.29
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Southern Classics Series
  • Paperback: 233 pages
  • Publisher: J.S. Sanders Books (April 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1879941066
  • ISBN-13: 978-1879941069
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 0.8 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,392,393 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By william wetherell, II on September 4, 2014
Format: Paperback
These stories give the reader an insight into life in rural Georgia, and probably the Southeast, during a period that is not often covered by writers, contemporary or otherwise. They are not blood and thunder adventures. The reader who is curious about daily life and customs in the period from 1800 to 1835 will appreciate the frank, humorous and some times shocking view of Southern frontier society. One theme that runs through all these stories is that human nature, like it or not, is still pretty much the same.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By valette on December 13, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a gem for anyone interested in history. It's about Georgia, but is probably pretty comprehensive of all new settled lands in the south at least. His writing is easy to read which some older books are not. Some of the stories he tells are vastly amusing, and some make one wonder how our ancestors ever survived.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By T. Canaday on August 13, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A fascinating character study of humorous individuals in early 19th century Georgia. As a (slightly?) fictionalized account, it provides a feeling of being there and more firmly connects Southerners with our "rustic" ancestors showing them to be a lot more sophisticated in their personal interactions and humor than we might have thought.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Slokes VINE VOICE on June 10, 2013
Format: Paperback
I had little fun reading "Georgia Scenes," a collection of sketches by A. B. Longstreet first published in 1835, but it was educational. Scholars of early American literature and sociology may want this book to confirm or add to what they know of the antebellum South; I can't think of a reason for anyone else to open it.

A college president and advocate for states' rights and slavery, Augustus Baldwin Longstreet is also considered an early Southern humorist. According to the introduction in my 1957 edition by B. R. McElderry Jr. he may have influenced Mark Twain, born the year "Georgia Scenes" saw publication. You see a thread, anyway. Longstreet's focus is on capturing the ways various types of people talk, with long dialogues and minute descriptions of assorted oddities. But his inventiveness is much less than Twain's, and his humor is of a long-winded, observational kind rather than the cutting one-liners Twain excelled at. Reading Longstreet is tiring that way.

A good example is a sketch in this book praised at the time by Edgar Allan Poe. "The Debating Society" features a pair of bright young men who decide to play a trick on their debating club by coming up with a proposition that makes no sense to perplex their fellow club members: "WHETHER, AT PUBLIC ELECTIONS, SHOULD THE VOTES OF FACTION PREDOMINATE BY INTERNAL SUGGESTIONS OR THE BIAS OF JURISPRUDENCE?" For the next few pages, I struggled over a brick wall of doubletalk. That it's not supposed to make sense makes Longstreet's somewhat turgid style only harder reading than usual.

Many of the sketches here involve pranks of various kinds, which Longstreet reports on as an interested observer.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again