Buy New
$3.55
Qty:1
  • List Price: $3.99
  • Save: $0.44 (11%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 17 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Gerald McBoing Boing (Lit... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Gerald McBoing Boing (Little Golden Book) Hardcover – January 13, 2004


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$3.55
$1.18 $0.01
100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime
$3.55 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 17 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Gerald McBoing Boing (Little Golden Book) + GERALD MCBOING BOING ADVENTURE  (LIMITED EDITION) + GERALD MCBOING BOING FAIRY TALES  (LIMITED EDITION)
Price for all three: $18.03

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Kindle FreeTime Unlimited
Free one month trial
Get unlimited access to thousands of kid-safe books, apps and videos, for one low price, with Amazon FreeTime Unlimited. Get started for free. Learn more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 7 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 2
  • Series: Little Golden Book
  • Hardcover: 24 pages
  • Publisher: Golden Books (January 13, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375827218
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375827211
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 0.2 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #194,929 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

"Just suppose," said Ted "Dr. Seuss" Geisel, "there was a little kid who didn't speak words but only weird sounds?" Thus Gerald McBoing Boing was born, brought to life by a studio called United Productions of America as an animated cartoon. This delightful, rhyming story went on to win an Academy Award in 1951, and was briefly made available as a book at the time of the movie's release. And now it's back!

When Gerald McCloy turns two, he doesn't start talking like most children--he says "Boing boing!" instead. His George Jetson-style father, turning gray, rushes to call Doctor Malone, who decrees there is no cure. In time, Gerald only increases in volume, shouting "Boom!" like a big keg of exploding powder. School is no help, either. He cuckoos and honks in the classroom, "And as little Gerald/ grew older, he found/ When a fellow goes BAM!/ no one wants him around."

Outcast, forlorn, he runs away from home. But just as he is about to board a slow-moving freight, the owner of the BONG-BONG-BONG radio station accosts him by the tracks. "I need a smart fellow/ to make all the sounds,/ Who can bark like a dog/ and bay like the hounds!/ You're GONG is terrific,/ your toot is inspired!/ Quick come to BONG-BONG-BONG,/ McBoing Boing--you're hired!"

This fun and funny picture book--soaked in muted Fiestaware colors--lilts and bounces and boings like a good read-aloud should. Children will discover that sometimes it's our quirks that end up making us special. (Ages 3 and older) --Karin Snelson --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

This nostalgic adaptation of a 1950 Academy Award-winning animated cartoon features Dr. Seuss's inimitable rhymes, plus images from Crawford's original animation stills, which he based on Seuss's drawings. Gerald McCloy, a saucer-eyed boy with a rooster's comb of hair, doesn't talk like a normal kid. Instead, he makes noises, "louder and louder/ Till one day he went BOOM!/ like a big keg of powder!" Gerald's onomatopoeic talents shock his parents (shown as a classic '50s shirt-and-tie father and bouffant-haired mother in an apron and heels); further, he earns the unkind playground nickname "Gerald McBoing Boing." Dr. Seuss states the issue succinctly: "When a fellow goes SKREEK!/ he won't have any friends./ For once he says, 'Clang clang clang!'/ all the fun ends." Gerald prepares to hop a train out of town, but he's stopped by a radio mogul in search of a sound-effects specialist. As in The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, eccentricity pays off, big time: "Now Gerald is rich,/ he has friends, he's well fed,/ 'Cause he doesn't speak words,/ he goes boing boing instead!" If the conclusion is a tad materialistic, Gerald does appear happy on the soundstage, dressed as a cowboy for a radio serial. Fans of retro graphics will thrill to the vintage illustrations, in shades of olive green, mustardy ochre and spicy red; the snazzy contrasting typefaces used for the sound effects make it easy for Gerald's admirers to honk and clang energetically along. Ages 5-8. (Feb.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

"A person's a person, no matter how small," Theodor Seuss Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, would say. "Children want the same things we want. To laugh, to be challenged, to be entertained and delighted."

Brilliant, playful, and always respectful of children, Dr. Seuss charmed his way into the consciousness of four generations of youngsters and parents. In the process, he helped millions of kids learn to read.

Dr. Seuss was born Theodor Geisel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 2, 1904. After graduating from Dartmouth College in 1925, he went to Oxford University, intending to acquire a doctorate in literature. At Oxford, Geisel met Helen Palmer, whom he wed in 1927. Upon his return to America later that year, Geisel published cartoons and humorous articles for Judge, the leading humor magazine in America at that time. His cartoons also appeared in major magazines such as Life, Vanity Fair, and Liberty. Geisel gained national exposure when he won an advertising contract for an insecticide called Flit. He coined the phrase, "Quick, Henry, the Flit!" which became a popular expression.

Geisel published his first children's book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, in 1937, after 27 publishers rejected it.

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1984, an Academy Award, three Emmy Awards, three Grammy Awards, and three Caldecott Honors, Geisel wrote and illustrated 44 books. While Theodor Geisel died on September 24, 1991, Dr. Seuss lives on, inspiring generations of children of all ages to explore the joys of reading.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

(What's this?)
#14 Overall (See top 100 authors)
#14 in Books
#14 in Books

Customer Reviews

The illustrations are great too.
Kassiopeia
I read this story during the week of Dr. Seuss's birthday.
Lola
This was a favorite of mine as a child.
Roger S. Leblanc

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 36 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 22, 2000
Format: Library Binding
This was a favorite book in my family in the early 50s. My older sister still has our copy. I've spent years searching old book stores for it, but like Eloise, the best always return. It's an exciting book for kids of all ages. I'm going to get copies for all my children so they can share it when they have families of their own.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
36 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 9, 1999
Format: Library Binding
As an elementary school teacher I not only know and appreciate a good book, but I am even more amazed when a book offers some type of character enhancement. As a child, my mother read this book to me, and thirty years later it is still my favorite. I now read it to my kids, and love the message that "it's okay to be different."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 4, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I'm happy to see that Gerald Mcboing Boing is back for a new generation of readers. I fondly remember the book from my preschool days (and I have married children now).Gerald's misery at being different and rejected because of his inability to speak and then finding fame and self pride is presented in a charming manner that is easy to identify with. Its a short book with lots of funny pictures, just right for bedtime story.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Martha Schwope on March 3, 2000
Format: Hardcover
and treasured the book until I was a teenager and lent it to an unscrupulous neighbor who never returned it. She was a speech teacher and wanted to show it to her class. I've never been able to understand why such a fabulous Dr. Seuss book was never reissued. So hooray! I'm buying several today to send to my nieces and nephews. And one for me -- to share with MY class!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Sara Linda Nelson on June 20, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book caught my eye when I saw "Dr.Seuss" on the cover, but also because of the fantastic artwork by Mel Crawford. I absolutely love the rhymes and making all the various sounds which accompany the text. I have a 2 year old daughter who looks forward to each sound with eager anticipation! It's easy to slam this book for being trenched in 1950's family life, and to condemn it for painting Gerald as universally unaccepted. Reading to your child is supposed to be fun. Hopefully it will also foster a desire to learn to read. This book was not written to demonstrate to children that our lives can be unfair and unequal. If after reading this book you feel uneasy about its subtext then a few things are wrong: 1) you are reading too much into the book 2) you should examine your own relationship with your child and 3) you missed the point of the book -- to provide fun and lively reading material that just might inspire a child to pick up a book on his or her own.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By mrfike on October 27, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I've read a couple reviews of this book that say it has a "bad" or "negative" message. One review even said the message "stinks". Well, these people are obviously entirely missing the point. In using metaphor and allegory, Dr. Seuss (amusingly as was his style) is shining a light on society's downfalls, not saying "different is bad".

Come on people, this is a great book. Very bouncy, very fun. Like all of Dr Seuss' stuff it brings a smile to my face, even as a jaded, cynical 30-something (did I just use that term?) year old. Lighten up, have fun! Fun is Good !!! (remember?)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 26, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Misconception of every difference as being "bad" is one of the human traits that is most useful to eliminate as early as possible. Like the classic tale of "The Ugly Duckling," "Gerald McBoing Boing" provides a wonderful paean to the beauty of differences.
Emotionally, Gerald is taken through a course of being first puzzled by everyone's reactions to him, then feeling rejected, then ostracized, then wanted, and finally craved like a pop idol.
Gerald is unable to speak. Instead, he can make all kinds of weird noises. His first one is "boing boing." Later he adds "boom!" and "skeek!" and "clang clang clang." These noises create negative reactions in all those around him until he finds his place as a source of sounds for radio shows. He can do a terrific "clop-clop, bang!" (a cowboy on a horse, who shoots his gun).
"Now Gerald is rich, he has friends, he's well fed
'Cause he doesn't speak words, he goes BOING BOING instead!"
As you can see, the rhymes are typical Dr. Seuss.
Children are hyper-sensitive to any differences they notice in themselves, and are inclined to think of these differences as deficiencies rather than as unique and positive aspects of themselves. This story gives you a chance to reinforce the specialness of your child and to celebrate her or his differences, and help him or her to do the same for other children and adults.
All of the most successful children's books mostly operate from the child's perspective. Gerald McBoing Boing is no exception. Your heart will ache for this poor child as his parents are baffled, his doctor stumped, his teacher nonplused, and children avoid him. When Gerald runs away from home, you will feel leaden and heart-sick.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kassiopeia on August 17, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I worshipped this book as a child. I still have my old copy that I now read to my four year old. She loves the book as much as I do. Interestingly, in my copy the author is anonymous, so the author as "Dr Suess" is new information to me. Although the other reviews do talk about the politically incorrect angles of this book, I think it brings about an excellent opportunity to discuss the way the world used to be. Particularly in terms of how we treated people with disabilities, as well as parenting fifties style.
Mostly, it is a wildly entertaining and creative story. Fun to read over and over again. The illustrations are great too. Obviously it has some sensitive material that is not dealt with in a very current fashion but I think the successful ending demonstrates that there is a place for everyone on this planet.
I loved finding out that this story was written by Dr. Suess!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?