Gerald Toto

Like (0)
|

Stay Up To Date

Sorry, there was an error with your request.
Sorry, there was an error with your request.
You are subscribed to new release e-mails for Gerald Toto.
You are no longer subscribed to new release e-mails for Gerald Toto.
Sorry, there was an error with your request.
Please wait...

We're sorry, but the page you're looking for is no longer available at this address.

Top Albums by Gerald Toto




Listen to full songs


Videos


Image of Gerald Toto
Provided by the artist or their representative

Latest Tweet

geraldtoto

Dernière séance de l'année, demain, at home sur le souffle et la voix, clôturant une belle rasade de neuf rendez... http://t.co/fpwMvEVsqc


At a Glance

Nationality: French
Born: 1967


Biography

Gerald Toto’s acoustic groove By Frédéric Garat

After participating in several collective projects, including the celebrated album Toto Bona Lokua, followed by an international tour, the Martinican Gérald Toto serves up Spring Fruits, a personal album flavoured with jazz, folk and English lyrics.
“Jazz is a definitive part of my musical culture. The title is a counter-echo of Strange Fruits with the positive message that there is always a rebirth. It says that spring is something you give to yourself. You can allow yourself this kind of spring and renaissance.”

With his lovely spring and ... Read more

Gerald Toto’s acoustic groove By Frédéric Garat

After participating in several collective projects, including the celebrated album Toto Bona Lokua, followed by an international tour, the Martinican Gérald Toto serves up Spring Fruits, a personal album flavoured with jazz, folk and English lyrics.
“Jazz is a definitive part of my musical culture. The title is a counter-echo of Strange Fruits with the positive message that there is always a rebirth. It says that spring is something you give to yourself. You can allow yourself this kind of spring and renaissance.”

With his lovely spring and lovely renaissance, Gérald Toto’s Spring Fruits brings us a much gayer, more festive album than Billie Holiday’s sombre and macabre Strange Fruits. The twelve tracks that comprise Toto’s inspired opus are a lot more joyful and succulent than the jazz diva’s well-known hit. A harvest not to be missed, given the West Indian artist’s scant production: with only four albums in thirteen years, including one with Richard Bona and Lokua, these are rare fruits. The musician belongs to a generation steeped in groove and Anglo-Saxon inspiration (Ruan Rozoff, Sinclair, Bruno Maman) that, with the exception of M, has never really got through to French audiences.

On this home-produced album, sung entirely in English, Gérald Toto skilfully mixes genres, from the tender, medieval lullaby My Child to the almost Sahelian groove of Freedom that could well have been cooked up in the Malian town of Ségou. “Shame on me!” exclaims the singer. “I don’t know Africa. I have toured with Lokua Kanza and Richard Bona, but I have never been to Africa. I did, however, start listening to African music at home from an early age … makossa, and Zairian rumba.”

There are filigree threads of African music running through Spring Fruits, in the midst of Stanley Beckford-style reggae hues on Easily Get Lost or the Hendrix-style Black Mary (if you get the chance, listen to his cover of If 6 was 9 on the album Les jours meilleurs dating from 1998). Worth mentioning too is Dive, which takes us deep into a dream world with vocal waves and flowing acoustic guitar.

Acoustics dominate this album, with some superb backing from the Franco-American violinist and pianist Alice Orpheus. “I discovered him on MySpace, and I told myself that I just had to meet the guy! He’s lived multiple lives, from the States, to Japan and New Zealand. Our partnership was prolific from the start. We worked into the small hours, sending each other text messages and notes at four a.m.”

A fomenting riot of notes and rhymes that generated a fourth album as fresh and sweet-tasting as a ripe spring fruit.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Gerald Toto’s acoustic groove By Frédéric Garat

After participating in several collective projects, including the celebrated album Toto Bona Lokua, followed by an international tour, the Martinican Gérald Toto serves up Spring Fruits, a personal album flavoured with jazz, folk and English lyrics.
“Jazz is a definitive part of my musical culture. The title is a counter-echo of Strange Fruits with the positive message that there is always a rebirth. It says that spring is something you give to yourself. You can allow yourself this kind of spring and renaissance.”

With his lovely spring and lovely renaissance, Gérald Toto’s Spring Fruits brings us a much gayer, more festive album than Billie Holiday’s sombre and macabre Strange Fruits. The twelve tracks that comprise Toto’s inspired opus are a lot more joyful and succulent than the jazz diva’s well-known hit. A harvest not to be missed, given the West Indian artist’s scant production: with only four albums in thirteen years, including one with Richard Bona and Lokua, these are rare fruits. The musician belongs to a generation steeped in groove and Anglo-Saxon inspiration (Ruan Rozoff, Sinclair, Bruno Maman) that, with the exception of M, has never really got through to French audiences.

On this home-produced album, sung entirely in English, Gérald Toto skilfully mixes genres, from the tender, medieval lullaby My Child to the almost Sahelian groove of Freedom that could well have been cooked up in the Malian town of Ségou. “Shame on me!” exclaims the singer. “I don’t know Africa. I have toured with Lokua Kanza and Richard Bona, but I have never been to Africa. I did, however, start listening to African music at home from an early age … makossa, and Zairian rumba.”

There are filigree threads of African music running through Spring Fruits, in the midst of Stanley Beckford-style reggae hues on Easily Get Lost or the Hendrix-style Black Mary (if you get the chance, listen to his cover of If 6 was 9 on the album Les jours meilleurs dating from 1998). Worth mentioning too is Dive, which takes us deep into a dream world with vocal waves and flowing acoustic guitar.

Acoustics dominate this album, with some superb backing from the Franco-American violinist and pianist Alice Orpheus. “I discovered him on MySpace, and I told myself that I just had to meet the guy! He’s lived multiple lives, from the States, to Japan and New Zealand. Our partnership was prolific from the start. We worked into the small hours, sending each other text messages and notes at four a.m.”

A fomenting riot of notes and rhymes that generated a fourth album as fresh and sweet-tasting as a ripe spring fruit.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Gerald Toto’s acoustic groove By Frédéric Garat

After participating in several collective projects, including the celebrated album Toto Bona Lokua, followed by an international tour, the Martinican Gérald Toto serves up Spring Fruits, a personal album flavoured with jazz, folk and English lyrics.
“Jazz is a definitive part of my musical culture. The title is a counter-echo of Strange Fruits with the positive message that there is always a rebirth. It says that spring is something you give to yourself. You can allow yourself this kind of spring and renaissance.”

With his lovely spring and lovely renaissance, Gérald Toto’s Spring Fruits brings us a much gayer, more festive album than Billie Holiday’s sombre and macabre Strange Fruits. The twelve tracks that comprise Toto’s inspired opus are a lot more joyful and succulent than the jazz diva’s well-known hit. A harvest not to be missed, given the West Indian artist’s scant production: with only four albums in thirteen years, including one with Richard Bona and Lokua, these are rare fruits. The musician belongs to a generation steeped in groove and Anglo-Saxon inspiration (Ruan Rozoff, Sinclair, Bruno Maman) that, with the exception of M, has never really got through to French audiences.

On this home-produced album, sung entirely in English, Gérald Toto skilfully mixes genres, from the tender, medieval lullaby My Child to the almost Sahelian groove of Freedom that could well have been cooked up in the Malian town of Ségou. “Shame on me!” exclaims the singer. “I don’t know Africa. I have toured with Lokua Kanza and Richard Bona, but I have never been to Africa. I did, however, start listening to African music at home from an early age … makossa, and Zairian rumba.”

There are filigree threads of African music running through Spring Fruits, in the midst of Stanley Beckford-style reggae hues on Easily Get Lost or the Hendrix-style Black Mary (if you get the chance, listen to his cover of If 6 was 9 on the album Les jours meilleurs dating from 1998). Worth mentioning too is Dive, which takes us deep into a dream world with vocal waves and flowing acoustic guitar.

Acoustics dominate this album, with some superb backing from the Franco-American violinist and pianist Alice Orpheus. “I discovered him on MySpace, and I told myself that I just had to meet the guy! He’s lived multiple lives, from the States, to Japan and New Zealand. Our partnership was prolific from the start. We worked into the small hours, sending each other text messages and notes at four a.m.”

A fomenting riot of notes and rhymes that generated a fourth album as fresh and sweet-tasting as a ripe spring fruit.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Improve This Page

If you’re the artist, you can update your biography, photos, videos, and more at Artist Central.

Get started at Artist Central

Feedback

Check out our Artist Stores FAQ
Send us feedback about this page