The Germanization of Early Medieval Christianity and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$57.27
Qty:1
  • List Price: $63.00
  • Save: $5.73 (9%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Trade in your item
Get a $11.51
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Germanization of Early Medieval Christianity: A Sociohistorical Approach to Religious Transformation Paperback – June 20, 1996

ISBN-13: 978-0195104660 ISBN-10: 0195104668

Buy New
Price: $57.27
30 New from $26.62 15 Used from $23.83
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$57.27
$26.62 $23.83
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

The Germanization of Early Medieval Christianity: A Sociohistorical Approach to Religious Transformation + A History of Christianity in Asia: Beginnings to 1500 + The Lost History of Christianity: The Thousand-Year Golden Age of the Church in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia--and How It Died
Price for all three: $98.46

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (June 20, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195104668
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195104660
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #546,145 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"An intelligent synthesis of observations from a wide range of anthropological, historical, and other literature."--Catholic Historical Review


"Highly interesting and challenging reading. An important contribution to research."--Theological Studies.


"Russell develops a general model of religious change that ought to be of interest to anyone concerned with the sociology (or anthropology) of belief systems per se, let alone the history of the Church."--C. Scott Littleton, Occidental College.


"Fascinating. It is a very important contribution to the growing awareness of the bright light of the 'Dark' Ages."--Ronald Murphy, Georgetown University


About the Author


James C. Russell received his doctorate in Historical Theology from Fordham University. He teaches at Saint Peter's College.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
1
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 10 customer reviews
Very well worth reading and study.
Anne Rice
I stumbled upon this book while researching for a study of the conjoined paganization/Christianization of Medieval literature.
Elliot B. Bougis
Much of it reads like it's very well written free flowing stream-of-consciousness writing.
David E. Witt

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 1, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Scholar James Russell has given us an important work with this detailed study. Subtitled "A sociohistorical approach to religious transformation," it is an exceedingly well-researched and documented analysis of the conversion of the Germanic tribes to the imported and fundamentally alien religion of Christianity during the period of 376-754 of the Common Era. Russell's work is all the more dynamic as he does not limit his inquiry simply to one field of study, but rather utilizes insights from sources as varied as modern sociobiological understanding of kinship behaviors, theological models on the nature of religious conversion, and comparative Indo-European religious research. Dexterously culling relevant evidence from such disparate disciplines, he then interprets a vast array of documentary material from the period of European history in question. The end result is a convincing book that offers a wealth of food for thought-not just in regards to historical conceptions of the past, but with far-reaching implications which relate directly to the tide of spiritual malaise currently at a high water mark in the collective European psyche. The first half of Russell's work provides an in-depth examination of various aspects of conversion, Christianization and Germanization, allowing him to arrive at a functional definition of religious transformation which he then applies to the more straightforward historical research material in the latter sections of the book. Along the way he presents a lucid exploration of ancient Germanic religiosity and social structure, placed appropriately in the wider context of a much older Indo-European religious tradition.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Elliot B. Bougis on July 27, 2001
Format: Paperback
I stumbled upon this book while researching for a study of the conjoined paganization/Christianization of Medieval literature. What a find! As the reviewer above mentioned, Russell's strength lies in the amazing range of his scholarship. This intellectual breadth, however, does not detract from Russell's more focused, balanced, and lucid examination of key points (e.g., anomie as a factor in social religious conversion, fundamental worldview clashes between Christianity and Germanic converts, etc.). Russell covers a lot of ground in a mere 200+ pages. Moreover, his final assertions are modest enough to be credible, and yet daring enough to remain highly interesting. Plus, from a research perspective, the bibliography alone is worth a handful of other books. This book has been normative in my decisions about the contours of any future scholarship I pursue. Alas, I was left hungering for a continuation of many of the themes, to which Russell often just alludes (e.g, the imbibed Germanic ethos as the animus for the "Christian" Crusades, the contemporary implications of urban anomie for our globalizing world, etc.). Of course, such stellar scholarship cannot be rushed. Surely Russell's next inquiry is worth the wait!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mikel Crees on August 6, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Really explains the misplaced "Warrior Mentality" within the Christian Religion. Also shows how the "New Faith" was used to subjugate the Germanic Tribes yet could not irradicate the Old Faiths and ended up unintentionally usurping and warping much of the Old Lore. A must read for any serious student of the PreChristian Religions and their effects on Christianity.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Anne Rice on December 2, 2013
Format: Paperback
All my life it seems I've been wrestling with this conflict, that the core documents of the Christian faith are obviously profoundly world rejecting, and yet the Catholicism into which I was born in New Orleans was essentially world-affirming and embracing with its sensuous rituals, its accommodation of art and music and Dionysian urges and its long European traditions and customs. Well, this brilliantly written and highly accessible book tackles the big question of how this Middle Eastern religion, Christianity, which is indeed world denying and world rejecting came to be what it is today in the West: and essentially the author explains his theory that it was the Germanization of Christianity that was responsible. When the Frankish tribes converted under Clovis, accommodations were made for the values and ideas of these Germanic tribes that essentially embraced their customs and ways resulting in a new mutation of the basic faith. ---
(Note: Ellis Rivkin, the great Jewish historian, has written eloquently about how Judaism and Christianity are mutational religions and I think this book, though it does not refer to Rivkin, explains one of the major mutations.).
The book goes on to discuss with impressive clarity how this Germanization affected the faith down through the ages, during the Reformation and on right up to Vatican II and beyond. Very well worth reading and study. Downright enjoyable. A delight to study and absorb. ------
If the big questions fascinate you, if you love historians who seek to embrace the great arc of history, if you are intrigued by the contradictions at the heart of Christian faith and its evolution in history, if you value eloquent and accessible prose you may love this book.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?