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Geronimo's Story of His Life Paperback – June 1, 2010


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Geronimo's Story of His Life + Once They Moved Like The Wind : Cochise, Geronimo, And The Apache Wars + Geronimo: My Life (Native American)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Bottom of the Hill Publishing (June 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1935785273
  • ISBN-13: 978-1935785279
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (134 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #361,117 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“He and his men were the terror of the country, always leaving a trail of bloodshed and devastation.”  (The New York Times) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Author

“I am thankful that the President of the United States has given me permission to tell my story. I hope that he and those in authority under him will read my story and judge whether my people have been rightly treated.”

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

This was a pretty good book and a fast read.
Michael B. Holbert
Geronimo: His Own Story is a wonderful portrait of one of American History's most courageous heroes.
Tom Birkenstock
Great story by Geronimo himself through translation.
Bum

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

71 of 73 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Mazza HALL OF FAME on December 9, 2004
Format: Paperback
"Geronimo: His Own Story" has been revised and edited, with an introduction and notes, by Frederick Turner. This book is the autobiography of the legendary Apache warrior, as told to S. M. Barrett. The copyright page notes that the main text was originally published as "Geronimo's Story of His Life" in 1906.

The revised edition includes the 1906 preface by Barrett; a 33 page introduction by Turner; a "Note on the Text," which describes the genesis of the book; a map, "Apache Country, 1865-1886"; a bibliography; and a generous collection of photographs showing both Geronimo at various stages in his life, and other people of his times. Barrett's introduction tells how the text was delivered orally by Geronimo, and how translator Asa Daklugie helped Barrett turn it into book form. Indeed, in his introduction Turner notes that Geronimo's story is "a preliterate and essentially a prewhite narrative." Altogether the text and supplemental features are about 200 pages long.

Geronimo's fascinating story begins with an Apache creation myth. He discusses his early life, his family, his battles against the Mexicans, his conflict with United States forces, and his life as a prisoner-of-war under U.S. military control. I was especially interested by his descriptions of the military tactics he used. Geronimo also discusses Apache life: religion, hunting, cultural taboos, etc. The book includes some really remarkable accounts, such as Geronimo's visit to the St. Louis World's Fair. The text is quite poignant when Geronimo reflects upon his hope for the survival of his people and their culture.

I would recommend this book to all who are interested in Native American studies, 19th century American history, military autobiography, and the relationship between oral and written literature. But above all, this book is an encounter with an extraordinary human being whose voice remains passionate and compelling after all these decades.
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39 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Tom Birkenstock on January 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
Geronimo: His Own Story is an endlessly fascinating autobiography that belongs in the pantheon of other great American works of autobiography and memoir. This book should take its place alonside other great works of personal non-fiction such as The Autobiography of Malcom X, A Moveable Feast, The Autobiography of Mark Twain, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, and (arguably the best of the bunch) The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. This is a strong statement, but after reading this short autobiography it's at least an idea that should be entertained. I found things in this book that I was not expecting, and it ended up being a far more complex and intriguing portrait of Geronimo than I had previously entertained. The most fascinating side of Geronimo that comes across in these two-hundred pages is not Geronimo the warrior but Geronimo the diplomat.

S. M. Barrett's introduction tells us that after Geronimo finished what he wanted to say he would not take questions or add anything more, but merely stated "`Write what I have spoken.'" These are the actions of a man who has a very specific purpose he is pursuing. After reading Geronimo's story I believe his purpose in publishing his tale was to accomplish in peace what he was unable to in war--he wanted to deliver his people back to Arizona.

Geronimo dedicates his story to Theodore Roosevelt, because, in his words, he "knows I speak the truth;...he is fair minded and will cause my people to receive justice in the future; and because he is chief of a great people." Even before his story has started Geronimo strikes a cordial tone. Not only are Geronimo's words flowing with accolades, but they are also giving Roosevelt something to live up to.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By D. McGraw II on April 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
No greater story can be told about Geromino than one told by the man himself. Not only do we gain insight to this famous figure in history, but we also get an in-depth account of Apache life and philosophy. There are many books that describe the Apache lifestyle, but it is rare to come across a first person account. Learn about Geronimo's ancestry, how he got his name, and the many wars he waged on the Mexicans. Read about life on the reservation and if the U.S. government upheld their end of the bargain. I definitely recommend this book to any lover of Native American history
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17 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Michael B. Holbert on September 6, 2001
Format: Paperback
This was a pretty good book and a fast read. The book has an introduction with some history about the Apache conflict and then goes into the part that is Geronimos own words, translated in the early 1900's. The book does point out places in the text that are disputed as being the words of Geronimo. He talks about things that happened to him as a child and as a young man.
However some things that are discussed in detail in traditional history books are barely mentioned here. There are some good pictures in the book. It's very interesting to hear it from his point of view, but I would also recommend other sources to get the complete story from both sides. I would compare the way the text reads to the book "Black Elk Speaks".
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Charles Hunt on December 4, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Geronimo! The kids' saying I used in the 1960's just before I launched a dirt clod against my neighborhood enemy hidden behind the garbage can. This book puts Geronimo in perspective, an Apache Indian from the southwest, that spanned the traditional indian culture of the first half of the 1800s to the pre-modern white world of the early 1900s and the 1904 World's Fair in St. Lious. Geronimo gives his side of the story to S.M. Barrett, a Superintendent of Schools while he (Geronimo) was a "prisoner of war" on the Fort Sill Indian Reservation in Oklahoma 1905-1906.

Geronimo presents his story, laid out by topic: Origin of the Apache Indians, Early Life, The Mexicans, Raids That Were Successful, Heavy Fighting, Coming Of The White Men, Greatest of Wrongs, Removals, Prison And On The Warpath, The Final Struggle, Surrender of Geronimo and A Prisoner of War. Each brief chapter tells a vivid and honest picture of Geronimo's life through his own eyes, clearly documented by Mr. Barrett.

Geronimo's story describes the life of an Apache Indian warrior and chief, as the traditional Indian culture is smothered, as the American and Mexican cultures envelope and then quickly swallow many of the ancient ways of the past.

The 20 or so photographs in this book are excellent, they include portraits of Geronimo, his family, and friends.
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