Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue/An American in Paris

September 29, 1987 | Format: MP3

$9.99
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
16:27
30
2
18:22


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 29, 1987
  • Release Date: September 29, 1987
  • Label: Sony Classical
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 34:49
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00138CT0W
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (78 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #66,847 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Great, timeless, classic music.
Mr. Kendall A. Whitney
I highly recommend this CD to those who love George Gershwin's music.
J Renee
This is wonderful music you can listen to anytime.
Diane L. Thorpe

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

64 of 74 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 30, 1999
Format: Audio CD
These are considered to be among the best performances of both pieces. Berstein's vitality serves well here and is a perfect match for Gershwin's music. However, the Bernstein Century recording with these peices is coupled with Grofe's Grand Canyon at roughly the same price, making it a better deal...
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Frederick Baptist on June 6, 2006
Format: Audio CD
This ADD recording has surprisingly good sound quality for an older recording that hasn't been remastered. The performance by Bernstein and both the Columbia Symphonic and the NY Philharmonic on the pieces is simply breathtaking. You'd be hard pressed to find better interpretations of these Gershwin masterpieces. The only problem with this album is that it's very short and although would have been the perfect length on an lp or cassette as it was originally, it seems to be a waste of cd space here. Sony should probably remaster this and add some tracks like perhaps "Porgy and Bess" to make it a better value proposition. I hope they re-release a remastered version on mini-lp sleeve replica packaging too.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By SlanFan on June 10, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Fifty years and change ago, I got to know both these Gershwin masterpieces when I bought a copy of the Bernstein LP from Columbia. I've since heard other renditions of these works by other conductors and pianists, and Bernstein's rendition of An American in Paris holds up against all recordings (including Bernstein's own earlier mono recording for RCA Victor). However, the Rhapsody is another matter entirely. When I heard Leonard Pennario's recording a few years later, I realized that Bernstein, or someone, had made a number of cuts in the Rhapsody, so that this recording doesn't have the entire piece. (I read reviews of the original LP at the time it was released, and none of them mentioned the cuts, which was the beginning of a lifelong distrust by me of professional critics.) Furthermore, Bernstein takes the Rhapsody at a slower pace than most pianists -- including Gershwin himself, in an acoustic recording which used to be available on RCA (unfortunately, a version with even more cuts than Bernstein's version), and also on a player piano roll which the composer cut (available on several recordings, including one with Michael Tilson Thomas conducting an orchestra in accompaniment). Bernstein was known sometimes to opt for odd tempos, sometimes painfully slow ones, and this seems to be one of the times he did so. (Others include his excruciatingly slow version of Bach's Magnificat, and his eccentric, but at least interesting, take on Shostakovich's fifth symphony.) So this recording of the Rhapsody is strictly for Bernstein fans, and people who like lethargic tempos. The best recording of the Rhapsody in Blue, uncut and at an appropriate tempo, which I have heard is the RCA recording with Earl Wild at the keyboard and Arthur Fiedler conducting the Boston Pops, still available on CD.Read more ›
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Matthew A. Belfiore on August 18, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I originally found this record in a used record store and purchased it for $1. This was not too long ago. After listening, i could not believe that this record only cost me $1 and that some idiot actually sold this to a used record store without listening first. I have never heard a performace of Rhapsody In Blue that is as powerful and heartfelt as this one. Bernstain melts into the piano, resulting in a performance that outshines so many Gershwin performances that exist. On the other side of the record is An American In Paris, a textbook tone poem, and i mean this as a great compliment. The images of Paris and a partially homesick/partially jubilant American strolling along exude from every note. When i found these great performances on CD, i snatched up a copy as quickly as i could. GET THIS RECORD. It is truly a Great Performance.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Hiram Gomez Pardo HALL OF FAME on November 22, 2006
Format: Audio Cassette
To play Gershwin accurately demands from the player, the absolute domain of an invisible taste, unsaid in the score. Few pianists (and Bernstein is among them) were able to convey the listener, this savoir vivre, humor, elegance, that idiomatic atmosphere that plainly justifies your effort.

To my mind, there just have been five pianists who have surmounted this peak: Oscar Levant, Jesus Maria Sanroma, Eugene List, Earl Wild and Leonard Bernstein.

So, under any pretext you should miss this invaluable musical gem.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robert E. Nylund on October 14, 2010
Format: Audio CD
We all know that Leonard Bernstein was a great conductor, possibly the greatest of the American born conductors of the twentieth century. It was wonderful to learn that Bernstein was always an excellent pianist. On occasion, Bernstein would conduct the orchestra AND play the piano, too. In the early days of stereo LPs, Columbia Records released Bernstein's recording of two masterpieces by George Gershwin: "An American in Paris" and "Rhapsody in Blue." For some reason, the album featured two DIFFERENT orchestra: the New York Philharmonic in "An American in Paris" and the Columbia Symphony in "Rhapsody in Blue."

While it is obvious that the New York Philharmonic was an established orchestra, actually the oldest symphonic orchestra in the country (founded in 1842, the same year that the Vienna Philharmonic was started), many people have wondered what was the Columbia Symphony Orchestra. There is a simple answer. Columbia Records, the oldest recording company in America, sometimes wanted to make recordings with a "house" orchestra and it was apparently cheaper and easier to simply contract New York musicians and put together an ensemble of musicians. They usually recorded in Columbia's 30th Street Studios. This practice went back to at least 1949, when Sir Thomas Beecham visited New York and made a series of high fidelity recordings in Columbia's studios, which were released on both 78-rpm and 33-1/3 rpm discs. Sometimes, however, the Columbia Symphony Orchestra was also drawn from Los Angeles musicians, as was the case with some of the late recordings made for Columbia by Bruno Walter, who lived in Beverly Hills.
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