Trade in your item
Get a $1.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Gestapo Chief : The 1948 Interrogation of Heinrich Muller Hardcover – July 1, 1996

ISBN-13: 978-0912138626 ISBN-10: 0912138629 Edition: 1st

9 New from $72.81 23 Used from $42.11
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, July 1, 1996
"Please retry"
$72.81 $42.11
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: R James Bender Pub; 1st edition (July 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0912138629
  • ISBN-13: 978-0912138626
  • Product Dimensions: 11.9 x 5 x 3.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,357,596 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 13 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 8, 2000
This is one of four books that have appeared since 1995 on the postwar association of former SS-Gruppenfuehrer Heinrich ("Gestapo"-)Mueller with the American Intelligence community. From the outset, it is well worth having by every scholar or educated laymen interested in the last phase of World War II in Europe and its aftermath. The content is, to put it mildly, volatile, or certainly would be in an age less indifferent to such revelations. The public, particularly the academic public, has a right to be skeptical. Recall, after all, what embarrassment was visited upon the British historian, Hugh Trevor-Roper, when seventeen years ago he pronounced the "Hitler Diaries" authentic. Douglas clearly is not impressed with academics. Perhaps rightly so, given the 1983 fiasco. One recalls Hegel's allusion to the "Hofhistoriker," the "court historians," and all of the ramifications of such a designation. Douglas provides photocopies of documents from the US Army and several Intelligence agencies, all of which, were they fakes, might easily have been refuted over four years ago. That has not happened. People are named whose relatives, where the statements made in this volume and those that followed not true, would most certainly have had recourse to litigation. That, apparently, has also not happened. The revelations concerning Mueller should be seen within the wider context of CIA engagement of former Gestapo agents such as Klaus Barbie (a small fish, in comparison to Mueller) as experts in the West's anti-communist efforts, which reached a fever pitch in the late 1940s.Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By David J. Moore on October 18, 1997
In this first volume of several, former Gestapo chief, Heinrich Muller, provides a different view of many of the events of World War II in this purported transcript of a U.S Intelligence debriefing recorded in 1948. The original debrief is supposedly some 800,000 words and this book (and following volumes) are Muller's comments regarding some of the more significant events and issues. In Volume I, Muller describes German interception of conversations between Roosevelt and Churchill in which Churchill informs FDR on November 26, 1941 that the Japanese fleet is moving East. The two then discuss the prospects of the U.S. being drawn into the war against Germany if the Japanese are able to force the U.S. into war. Muller also claims that Hitler did not die in the Berlin bunker as most historians believe but escaped to Spain. He also provides vivid descriptions of many of the Nazi personalities and their relationships to Hitler and the Nazi cause. Of particular interest is the description of the Gestapo investigation which took place as a result of the abortive assassination attempt on Hitler in July 1944. Muller also provides his views on the deathcamps and the holocaust. While he does not deny that many warcrimes were committed, he does present a far different picture than what has previously been accepted with few challenges. This is an interesting book by Gregory Douglas, a Christian writer and military editor of the Military Advisor magazine. Although it disputes many official versions of WWII events, it is well documented and takes pains to head off challenges to its authenticity. It's greatest critics will come from those who staunchly defend the accuracy of the holocaust as conventional historians have reported it.Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 27, 1999
Can this book be true? Is it a hoax like the HITLER DIARIES? Is it a hoax like Clifford Irvings " Unauthorized Biography of Howard Hughes"? For all our sakes it better damn well be. What scares me is that I cannot refute a page of it. It is either the most shocking story to come out of WWII or the best fairy tale ever written. No wonder the first edition is out of print. If this book is true then Mr Douglas should get a Pulitzer, if a hoax , he should be applauded for writing the best hoax of the 20th century. However in my heart I fear every word is true. It will take a smarter person than me to refute the allegations in this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Glenn Gates on April 16, 2003
While the authenticity of Mr. Douglas' material pertaining to Muller may still be out to question, all three volumes in this series are none the less thoroughly enjoyable reading.
The profuse annotations (about 50% of the material presented) provide a wealth of information for any enthusiast short of the true scholar.
For his own part, Mr. Douglas writes in a style that is smooth, lucid, and comprehensible, affording the reader that sort of relaxed flow that is rarely found in non-narratives.
Irrespective of whether the Muller claims are specious or truly authentic, I found these works to be fascinating and would highly recommend them to all.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Victor S. Alpher on November 17, 2003
Verified Purchase
This book is one of a series of four volumes published to date about the former head of internal security for the Third Reich: Heinrich Müller. The writer is a nonacademic historian by reputation, possibly a journalist by profession. Mr. Douglas relies on material not generally available, some available through the Freedom of Information Act or FOIA, one of the legacies of the Watergate Scandal of the 1970s. Much of the material are translations--and the reader must rely on them. In addition, we find a man here, born in 1900 (THAT appears noncontroversial). He began his career as a policeman in Bavaria, yet rose to the highest position of authority in the Gestapo (Geheimstaatspolizei) or Internal Reich Security in the Third Reich.
Those appear to be undisputed facts. However, what happened to Heinrich Müller after the War is a matter of conjecture. Following the narrative established by Douglas, General Müller's post-war career is nothing short of remarkable, and worthy of an extremely intelligent, worldly, and clever man. Some have attempted to discredit the works as simply inconsistent for a man who previously appeared unremarkable. I would suggest to the reader, however, that a 45 year old man, sprung at the end of a lifetime of wars, uncertainty, and rise to great power, might just be on the threshold of capitalizing on a lifetime of observation and learning from the great masters of deception, megalomania, and conversion of disgrace to respectability (on their terms), public admiration, and generation of fear.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews