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Get Color

September 8, 2009

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 8, 2009
  • Label: Lovepump United
  • Total Length: 32:54
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002MHG9LI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #86,120 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By somethingexcellent VINE VOICE on November 5, 2009
Format: Audio CD
When I heard the Health album from Health, there were tracks that cut straight to the bone and really got to me, but alongside these cuts were others that sounded a lot like a band trying to find its way. One remix album and a single later, and to my ears it sounds like the group has locked into something powerful, brutal, and beautiful all at the same time.

That aforementioned album of remixes may or may not have been the major reasoning behind their slightly new direction, but "Get Color" is a real grinder, with songs that sound like they're built from pure sinew and bone and primed for dancing (or at least thrashing about at a fast rhythmic pace).

The album kicks off with "In Heat," and it gets things going with a less than two-minute kick in the teeth that layers squeals of atonal synth, shimmering electronics, powerful drums and bass and light, almost ethereal male vocals. It's a perfect opener in that it sets the tone for the rest of the album, but swirls with intrigue and never feels like it completely locks in for too long.

From there, the album gets even better. First single "Die Slow" is one of those cuts that should become a huge hit (but would probably only due so in an alternate reality) as a lumbering synth groan and more bludgeoning drums give way to rave-up choruses that incredibly catchy, while "Before Tigers" powers up again and again by veering back and forth between huge crests of guitar noise and sprays of digital haze.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Geoffrey Caveney on April 21, 2010
Format: Audio CD
Quick question: What was the most important rock album of the '00s?

Answer: For 9 years and 8 months, there wasn't one. Give Spin credit for figuring this out and not making a best of the decade list at all. They saw it coming in their '85-'05 list where no '00s rock album ranked higher than #48. In one way or another the best rock music of the decade was a development of earlier sounds, from OK Computer to Nevermind to Murmur to punk to The Beatles to Chuck Berry. Nothing from 2000 to August 2009 sounded like a new direction in rock music.

Then HEALTH released Get Color with a few months to spare in the decade. This is a "noise rock" band incorporating elements of melodic pop into their noise and coming up with something startlingly original. Nirvana was famous for combining fast parts and slow parts in the same song; Get Color does the same thing for noise parts and melody parts. It's not pop melodies played loudly, and it's not a band trying to hide their pop songs behind a wall of noise. The melodies here are bright slivers of sunshine periodically breaking through the cloud cover of noise. Beyond that it's hard to describe this music, since it's so different from anything that's come before. This must have been what it felt like to hear Surfer Rosa in 1988. The stagnant post-Radiohead rock scene needs this desperately.

HEALTH is already known for the dance remixes of their music, and when I listen to this album it makes me want to hear the process in reverse: HEALTH reworking other pop songs in their noise style. Every listener will have their own set of songs that come to mind for this; I'll start with The Chameleons' "In Shreds", Yeah Yeah Yeahs' "Hysteric", Tears for Fears' "Shout", and the Loud Family's "Don't Respond, She Can Tell".

The sound of Get Color is going to have an enormous influence on the best rock music of the next decade. Look for it on Spin's best albums of the century list in 2015 or 2020.
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I feel like Health are ashamed of having fun making noise. The drums, electronics, and guitar work are all entirely ecstatic. Even though this is "harsh," industrial sounding, and dissonant (to tasteful effect), each "voice" in this band is a sympathetic character, familiar enough but not without endearing idiosyncrasies- maybe you just have to be a feedback-savvy, noisy musician yourself to understand the sheer joy invested into a record like this. I guess it's just the ghostly, extremely disaffected-sounding faux-Thom-Yorke singing and the deadpan "hardcore kids" live presentation which give the impression that there is probably some "point" I should be "getting" in the indiscernible lyrics. Maybe Health hold the same opinion as the Pitchfork reviewer who complained that he "didn't know how to feel" when listening to the record. I however, am of the opinion that the ambiguous, conflicted emotions that music of this nature confronts head on, rather than avoids, are what validates it. So as long as the instrumentals keep up the enthusiasm, energy, and emotional vocabulary like on Get Color I'll probably keep buying Health records.
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I picked this album up a little bit ago after stumbling across We Are Water while looking for something similar in sound to Crystal Castles. Unfortunately this album did not quite give me what I was hoping for. It did however give me hope for the future of the band. Most of the tracks on the album sound incomplete, as if they are missing a layer or two of sound to reach their full potential. Health is one of the newer breed of noise rock bands, taking the industrial movement of the mid 90's and making it more melodic. Health does this by having the music very raw and uncontained, but by having the vocals very harmonious and mellow. The contrast is fantastic, but it still feels like the band is evolving their sound and will have a more complete sound in their next album or two. If they manage to get the right producer, Health could burst onto the music scene and become one of the defining sounds of the decade.
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